Home

Latest Article

Luke 20:46 Beware of the scribes, which desire to walk in long robes
KJV Verse:

Luke 20:46 Beware of the scribes, which desire to walk in long robes, and love greetings in the markets, and the highest seats in the synagogues, and the chief rooms at feasts;

Greek Verse:

ΛΟΥΚΑΝ ​ 20:46 Προσέχετε ἀπὸ τῶν γραμματέων τῶν θελόντων περιπατεῖν ἐν στολαῖς καὶ φιλούντων ἀσπασμοὺς ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς καὶ πρωτοκαθεδρίας ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς καὶ πρωτοκλισίας ἐν τοῖς δείπνοις,

Literal Alternative:

Guard from those writers those desiring to strut in outfits and liking greetings in the marketplaces and the front seats at the meeting places and the best recliners in the meals.

Hidden Meaning:

The "long robes" here are described more like a military uniform or outfits. The word translated blandly as "walk" has the feeling of "strut". This verse is primarily humorous. It contains a number of words we only see Jesus use in the related verses in this and other Gospels. Strangely enough, these words are translated a little differently in the other versions.

The word translated as "beware" means"hold to", "offer", "turn toward", "attend to", "pay attention," and "be on your guard against". Its root is the Greek word meaning "have" and "hold". It works somewhat like our phrase "hold fast" but with the sense of guarding.

The word translated as "of" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.  It sometimes has the sense of "against" when used with verbs like this one.

"Scribes" is translated from a Greek word describing anyone who used written records in their job, "secretary", "registrar,' and "scholar." However, Christ used it to name those scholars who specifically studied the Bible and wrote about its meanings. A modern equivalent would be "academics."

The word translated as "which" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek word translated as "desire" expresses consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". It is not an active verb here, but an adjective, "desiring" which become a noun with the introductory article, "the desiring" or "those desiring".

"To walk" is a Greek verb that means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching." The English word "strut captures the way Jesus uses it.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"Long robes" is a noun that means "equipment", "fitting out", "armament", "equipment in dress". Since it is used for a soldiers clothing, "uniform" or, more generally, "outfit" would better translated it.  It is translated as "long clothing" in Mark.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Love" is the Greek word that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. More on the two types of "love" in this article.

"Greetings" is a Greek word that Jesus only uses here and in parallel verses that  means "greeting", "embrace," and "affection."  It is translated as "salutations" in Mark.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"The markets" is a common noun that means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace. "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

 "The highest seats" comes is another uncommon verb only found in parallel verse that literally means "first seats."  It is "chief seats" in Matthew.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The Greek word translated as "the synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"The chief rooms" is from protoklisia, which means "first seat at table," literally "foremost couches." It is translated as "uppermost rooms" in Matthew. The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest". In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root noun means a place for lying down or reclining", "anything for lying or sitting upon," a "couch for reclining at a table", "nuptial bed," and a "company" of people reclining at meals.

The "at" hear is the same word translated as "in" earlier in this verse. It means "in", "within", "with," or "among."

"Feasts" is from a word that means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food." It is introduced with an article, "the meals".

Vocabulary:

Προσέχετε ( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act ) "Beware" is the Greek prosecho, which means "hold to", "to offer", "turn to or toward," "to turn your mind toward," "to be on one's guard against", "to take heed", "to pay attention", "to devote oneself to", "to attach oneself", "to continue", "to hold fast to [a thing]," "to have in addition," or "pay court to." --

ἀπὸ (prep) "Of" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

τῶν γραμματέων ( noun pl masc gen ) "Scribes" is grammateus, which is generally a "secretary," "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar," but specifically means someone who uses gramma which is Greek for "drawings", "a letter," (as in an alphabet)"diagrams," and "letters" (as in correspondence).

τῶν (article pl masc gen) "Which" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

θελόντων ( part pl pres act masc gen ) "Want" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain", "to hold", "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly". .

περιπατεῖν ( verb pres inf act ) "To walk" is peripateo, which means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching."

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

στολαῖς [uncommon] ( noun pl fem dat) "Long clothing" is from stole, which means "equipment", "fitting out", "armament", "equipment in dress", "raiment", "garment", "robe," and "the act of dressing."

καὶ  (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

φιλούντων ( part pl pres act masc gen ) "Love" is phileo , which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of."

ἀσπασμοὺς [uncommon]( noun pl masc acc) "Greetings" is from aspasmos, which means "greeting", "embrace," and "affection."

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς ἀγοραῖς ( noun pl fem dat) "The markets" is from agora, which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace. "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you).

πρωτοκαθεδρίας [uncommon] (noun pl fem acc) "Highest seats" comes from protokathedria which literally means "first seats." The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest" from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root is kathedra, which means a "seat" to sit on, the "posterior," the "sitting posture", "sitting idle", "inaction," the "chair of a teacher," and "a throne."

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

ταῖς συναγωγαῖς ( noun pl fem dat ) "Synagogue" is synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πρωτοκλισίας [uncommon] (noun sg fem acc) "Uppermost rooms" is from protoklisia, which means "first seat at table," literally "foremost couches." The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest" from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root is klisia, which means "a place for lying down or reclining", "anything for lying or sitting upon," a "couch for reclining at a table", "nuptial bed," and a "company" of people reclining at meals.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τοῖς δείπνοις [uncommon] (noun pl masc dat) "Feasts" is from deipnon, which means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food."

Related Verses:

Luke 11:43 Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues,

Mark 12:38 Beware of the scribes...

Mark 12:39 And the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts:

Matthew 23:6 And love the uppermost rooms at feasts

Matthew 23:7 And greetings in the markets,