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Luke 20:37 Now that the dead are raised, even Moses shewed at the bush
KJV Verse:

Luke 20:37 Now that the dead are raised, even Moses shewed at the bush, when he calleth the Lord the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.

Greek Verse:

ΛΟΥΚΑΝ20:37 ὅτι δὲ ἐγείρονται οἱ νεκροὶ καὶ Μωυσῆς ἐμήνυσεν ἐπὶ τῆς βάτου, ὡς λέγειΚύριον τὸν θεὸν Ἀβραὰμ καὶ θεὸν Ἰσαὰκ καὶ θεὸν Ἰακώβ:”

Literal Alternative:

Because, however, they are awaken by themselves, these dead, as Moses indicated at the bramble. He says "Lord, the God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob."

Hidden Meaning:

This is likely a response to another question or comment that was not recorded. This cannot be seen in English because the "but" is edited out. It contains a unique word that makes its meaning clearer but which is translated into English as another word.

The Greek word translated as "now" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. It is edited out because the translators could not see the opposition to Jesus's previous statement.

The Greek source of "that" is a word that means "that" or "because."  The word is almost always translated as "for" inthe Gospels when it begins a clause as it does here. Again, this seems like the answer to a question or objection that was not recorded.

The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter.

The word for "are raised" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. The form is not a passive as translated, but a middle passive, indicating that the dead are awakened by or for themselves.

The Greek word translated as "even" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as". "Also" word here, but so does "as".

Moses is the Greek spelling of the Aramaic word.

"Shewed" is a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here. It is not the word usually translated as "shewed". This word  means to " disclose what is secret", "reveal", and "give an indication". It is likely used because Moses's "showing" is more like an indication, something subtle.

The word translated as "at" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

"Bush" is  a Greek word that means "bramble" or a "raspberry bush". The references is clearly to the Septuagint, the Greek OT, which uses the same word starting in Exodus 3:2 to describe the burning bush.

The word translated as "when" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

The word translated as "he calleth" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" "to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." 

The word translated as "the Lord " is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

"Of Abraham" is the Greek spelling of the name. However, since it doesn't have a Greek word ending, the "of" is assumed because it isn't part of the word.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." Here, it doesn't have the article.

"Of Isaac" is the Greek spelling of the name. However, since it doesn't have a Greek word ending, the "of" is assumed because it isn't part of the word.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." Here, it doesn't have the article.

"Of Jacob" is the Greek spelling of the name. However, since it doesn't have a Greek word ending, the "of" is assumed because it isn't part of the word.

 

Vocabulary:

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." --

δὲ (conj/adv) "Now" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

ἐγείρονται ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Are raised" is egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse." --

οἱ νεκροὶ (noun pl masc nom) "The dead" is nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic" --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

Μωυσῆς (not a Greek form or Aramaic one) "Moses" is from Moyses, which means "Moses".

ἐμήνυσεν [unique]( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Shewed" is mēnyō, which means to " disclose what is secret", "reveal", and "give an indication". 

ἐπὶ (prep) "At" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

τῆς βάτου,[uncommon]( noun sg fem gen )  "Bush" is from batos, which means "bramble" and "raspberry bush".

ὡς (adv/conj) "When" is hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

λέγει ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "He calleth" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Κύριον ( noun sg masc acc ) "Lord" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

τὸν θεὸν (noun sg masc acc ) "The God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Ἀβραὰμ (Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θεὸν (noun sg masc acc ) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Ἰσαὰκ (Aramaic) "Isaac" is from Isaak.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

θεὸν (noun sg masc acc ) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Ἰακώβ:” (Aramaic) "Jacob" is from Iakob.

Related Verses:

Matthew 22:31 But as touching the resurrection of the dead, 

Matthew 22:32 I am the God of Abraham, 

Mark 12:26 And as touching the dead, that they rise:

 

 

Most Recent Question

Question:
What does "Pay the uttermost farthing" mean in historical and clear context?
Answer:

You can see a fairly complete explanation of the Greek here: Matthew 5:26 ...Thou shalt by no means come out thence.

But to answer your question directly, we would say, “the last penny” today.

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