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Luk 8:10 Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom
KJV Verse:

Luk 8:10 Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God: but to others in parables; that seeing they might not see, and hearing they might not understand.

Greek Verse:

Ὑμῖν δέδοται γνῶναι τὰ μυστήρια τῆς βασιλείας τοῦ θεοῦ, τοῖς δὲλοιποῖς ἐν παραβολαῖς, ἵναβλέποντες μὴ βλέπωσιν καὶ ἀκούοντες μὴ συνίωσιν.”

Literal Alternative:

To you, it has granted itself to learn to know the revealed secrets of the reign of the Divinity. To those, however, the remaining? In parables in order that those seeing might not think they see and those hearing might not think they perceive. 

Hidden Meaning:

this is a response to the apostles asking why he speaks in parables, but this follows the last verse about listening and putting it together. this is an abbreviated form combining two verses (Matthew 13:11Matthew 13:13) into one. Again, English translation hides the differences, though slight, between the two versions. One difference, the use of a negative with a very different meaning, it significant. 

"It is given" is a verb which means "to give", "to grant", "to produce", "to devote oneself," and "to deliver." It is the world almost always translated as "give" in the Gospels. However, in the Greek, the form is a verb where the subject acts on itself, "it has given itself."

"To know" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn." It has the sense of recognizing people and recognizing facts. It also means like the earlier words in verse Mat 13:9 for "ears" and "hear", "to understand."

"Mystery" is a word that means "mystery", "secret revealed by God," and "superstition." It is specifically the term used for secret religious rites and knowledge.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" seems more appropriate. this is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will. This article covers it extensively.

The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "diety." It is introduced with an article, so "the God" or "the Divinity", Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

A less common word for "others" is used here. It means "the remainder" or "those remaining". It is not the word used in Matthew nor the other common Greek word for "others". 

"Parables" is translated from a Greek word, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy."

"Seeing" is a word that means "to look" and "to see." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding. In this first version, it is in the form of an adjective or noun "looking."

The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. The sense here is that they don't want to see or do think they see. this is different than the objective negative used in Matthew. 

"They might...see" is a word that means "to look" and "to see." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding. Here, it is in the form indicates something that might happen. A more certain form is used in Matthew. 

"Hearing" and "They hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

Again, the subjective negative is used for "not" when the objective negative was used in Matthew. 

"Understand" is a Greek verb which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive", "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out. It is in the future tense. Here, it is in the form indicates something that might happen. A more certain form is used in Matthew. 

Vocabulary:

Ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. -- The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners.

δέδοται (3rd sg perf ind mp) "It is given" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

γνῶναι . (verb aor inf act) "To know," is from ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

τὰ μυστήρια (noun pl neut acc) "Mystery" is mustêrion, which means "mystery", "secret doctrine", "secret rite", "mystic implements and ornaments", "secret revealed by God", "religious or mystical truth," and "superstition."

τῆς βασιλείας (noun sg fem gen) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ θεοῦ, (noun sg masc gen) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." 

τοῖς (article pl masc dat) "To" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). Here the form is plural so "those". See this article for more. 

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

λοιποῖς  [uncommon](adj pl masc dat) "Others" is from loipos, which means "remaining over," "the remaining," "the rest,: "descendants," of Time, "the future", "henceforward", "hereafter," and "the remaining."

ἐν (prep)"In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

παραβολαῖς, (noun pl fem dat) "Parables" is from parabole, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy." It is most often translated in the NT as "parable" but occasionally as "comparison." -- "Parable" is Greek for "analogy", "comparison," and "illustration." It doesn't mean simply "educational story" as it has come to mean in English. The fact that Christ speaks in analogies and illustrations is critical in understanding His words.

ἵνα (adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because." -- The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

βλέποντες (part pl pres act masc nom ) "Seeth" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." 

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

βλέπωσιν  (verb 3rd pl pres subj) "Seeth" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." -- The verb translated as "see ye" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

ἀκούοντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "Ye hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." -- "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. σ

υνίωσιν (verb 3rd pl pres subj act) "Understand" is from syniemi which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive", "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out.

Related Verses:

Matthew 13:11 Because it is given unto you

Matthew 13:13 Therefore I speak to them in parables: 

Most Recent Question

Question:
Do Mathew 18:15-17, and verse 21-22 of the same chapter contradict each other?
Answer:

Good observation! I always wonder why more people don’t discuss this type of discrepancy. Matthew 18:15-17 seems to set out a very logical, systematic way of dealing with disagreements, but this whole approach can possibly end with us breaking with our brothers. This doesn't mesh with Jesus’s teaching in general, which is to give and forgive without expecting anything in return. Matthew 21-22 is one example of his general approach, forgiving without limit, but Jesus’ entire body of work teaches us to “let go” of the missteps of others.

Resolving this clear contradiction is somewhat simple, especially since the...

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