Act 1:5 For John truly baptized with water;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because John dunked in water. You yourselves, however, into spirit will be dunked holy. Not after many  more days.

KJV : 

Act 1:5 For John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse helps us understand what Jesus means by being "baptized"  (explained in more detail in this article). "Baptized" is an untranslated Greek word that means "dipping." The phrases describing baptism as "with water" and "with the Holy Ghost" are very different and nether as the preposition usually translated as "with."  The "with" in "with water" comes from the dative form of the word water, which means "with" in the sense of water being an instrument. However, the "with Ghost/Spirit" is from the preposition that primarily means "into" but can also mean "with" in the sense of "along with" and "by" in the sense of "near."

The verses does have the preposition usually translated as "with," but none of the popular English translations actually translated it. It is used with the "days" phrase and means "after" when used with periods of time.

NIV : 

Act 1:5 For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.

3rd Translation: 

Act 1:5 John baptized with[fn] water, but in just a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅτι  (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

Ἰωάνης (noun sg masc gen) "John" is from Ioannes, which is the Greek form of the name "John." -

μὲν ( partic) "Truly" is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." Used with the conjunction de, as it is here, it points out the specific word being contrast after the conjunction. In English, we usually say, one one hand...on the others... See the article here for specific uses with other particles.

ἐβάπτισεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "baptized" is baptizo, which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."

ὕδατι, ( noun sg neut dat )  "With water" is  hydor, which means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

ὑμεῖς  (pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

δὲ (conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἐν  (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

πνεύματι ( noun sg neut dat) "Spirit" is pneuma, which means "blast", "wind", "breath", "the breath of life", "divine inspiration", "a spiritual or immaterial being," and "the spirit" of a man.

βαπτισθήσεσθε ( verb 2nd pl fut ind pass ) "shall be baptized" is baptizo, which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."

ἁγίῳ ( adj sg neut dat ) "Holy" is hagios, which means "devoted to the gods", "pure", "holy," and on the negative side "accursed."

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

μετὰ (prep) Untranslated is meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to,"  "after", "behind",  and "next afterward."

πολλὰς ( adj pl fem acc ) "Many" is polus, which means "many (in number)", "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far", "very much", "a great way," and "long."

ταύτας ( adj pl fem acc ) "Hence" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

ἡμέρας. (adj pl fem acc ) "Days" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

KJV Analysis: 

For -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

John -  "John" is the Greek word translated as the English proper name. 

truly-- The "truly" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by the "but" phrase.

baptized -- (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with -- This word "with" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

water;  -- "Water" is  a noun that means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

ye -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

shall  -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

baptized - (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with   -- (CW) The word translated as "with" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."  This is word is confusing because it looks like the "with" above, but that "with" came from the dative form of the verb while this one is a preposition.

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "the" in the Greek source.

Holy  -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment.  This word doesn't appear with "Ghost" but after the verb "baptized." The sense is that being dipped in spirit makes them holy.

Ghost  -- The word translated as "ghost" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit. 

not  -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

untranslated "after"-- (MW) The untranslated word  "after" is usually translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit. Here, it refers to time.

many -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

days -- The Greek word translated as "days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

hence. -- (WW) The "hence" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective. It appears after "many" and before "days" in the same form so the meaning is "many of these days" or "many more days."

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "with" before spirit is a preposition that usually means "into" and it is not from the word form as the previous "with" before "water" was.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "holy" doesn't appear with "ghost" but after "baptized."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "after" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hence" means "these."

NIV Analysis: 

For -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

John -  "John" is the Greek word translated as the English proper name. 

untranslated "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word "truly" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by the "but" phrase.

baptized -- (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with -- This word "with" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

water;  -- "Water" is  a noun that means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

untranslated "not"-- (MW) The untranslated word "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

in -- (WW) The word  "in" is usually translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit. Here, it refers to time.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

few -- (WW) The word translated as "few " means "many" in number, "great" in power or worth, and large in size.

untranslated "these"-- (MW)  The untranslated word "these"  can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective. It appears after "many" and before "days" in the same form so the meaning is "many of these days" or "many more days."

days -- The Greek word translated as "days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

you -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

baptized - (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with   -- (CW) The word translated as "with" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."  This is word is confusing because it looks like the "with" above, but that "with" came from the dative form of the verb while this one is a preposition.

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "the" in the Greek source.

Holy  -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment.  This word doesn't appear with "Ghost" but after the verb "baptized." The sense is that being dipped in spirit makes them holy.

Spirit-- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit.

NIV Translation Issues: 

10
  •  
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "truly" is not shown in the English translation.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "not" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "in" means "with."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "few" means "many."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "these" is not shown in the English translation.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "with" before spirit is a preposition that usually means "into" and it is not from the word form as the previous "with" before "water" was.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "holy" doesn't appear with "ghost" but after "baptized."

3rd Analysis: 

untranslated "Because"-- (MW) The untranslated word "that," "because," or "for"  introduces a statement of fact or cause.

John -  "John" is the Greek word translated as the English proper name. 

untranslated "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word "truly" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by the "but" phrase.

baptized -- (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with -- This word "with" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

water;  -- "Water" is  a noun that means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

untranslated "not"-- (MW) The untranslated word "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

in -- (WW) The word  "in" is usually translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit. Here, it refers to time.

just -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "just" in the Greek source.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

few -- (WW) The word translated as "few " means "many" in number, "great" in power or worth, and large in size.

untranslated "these"-- (MW)  The untranslated word "these"  can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective. It appears after "many" and before "days" in the same form so the meaning is "many of these days" or "many more days."

days -- The Greek word translated as "days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

you -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

baptized - (UW) The Greek word converted to English as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." In other words, the word is not translated. "To dunk" comes closest to the feeling.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being dunked."  See this article on the word.

with   -- (CW) The word translated as "with" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."  This is word is confusing because it looks like the "with" above, but that "with" came from the dative form of the verb while this one is a preposition.

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "the" in the Greek source.

Holy  -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment.  This word doesn't appear with "Ghost" but after the verb "baptized." The sense is that being dipped in spirit makes them holy.

Spirit-- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit. 

3rd Issue Count: 

12
  1. MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  2. MW - Missing Word -- The word "truly" is not shown in the English translation.
  3. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  4. MW - Missing Word -- The word "not" is not shown in the English translation.
  5. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "in" means "with."
  6. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "just" doesn't exist in the source.
  7. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "few" means "many."
  8. MW - Missing Word -- The word "these" is not shown in the English translation.
  9. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "baptized" means "dunked." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  10. CW - Confusing Word -- The "with" before spirit is a preposition that usually means "into" and it is not from the word form as the previous "with" before "water" was.
  11. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  12. WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "holy" doesn't appear with "ghost" but after "baptized.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 23 2020