Acts 1:7 It is not for you to know the times or the seasons,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Not yours is it to know times or seasons that the Father put by himself within this, his own authority.

KJV : 

Acts 1:7 It is not for you to know the times or the seasons, which the Father hath put in his own power.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The original Greek emphasizes that fact that the Father has put this information under his own authority alone. The verb "put" is a middle voice, which means he put it for himself or by himself., This idea is reemphasized by the use of the "his own" adjective to describe his "authority" or "power." This is further emphasized by the use of an article, "this his own authority," which is untranslated in all English translations because it seem so exaggerated.

NIV : 

Acts 1:7  It is not for you to know the times or dates the Father has set by his own authority.

3rd Translation: 

Acts 1:7 The Father alone has the authority to set those dates and times, and they are not for you to know.

Wordplay: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐχ  (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ὑμῶν  (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐστὶν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "It is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

γνῶναι ( verb aor inf act ) "To know," is ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

χρόνους  [9 verses]( noun pl masc acc ) "Times" is chronos, which means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age", "season", "delay," and "tense."

(conj/adv)  "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." OR (exclam) "Or" is e which is an exclamation meaning "hi!" OR (adv) "Or" is e, which is an adverb meaning "in truth" and "of a surety".

καιροὺς ( noun pl masc acc ) "Seasons" is kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit."

οὓς ( pron pl masc acc ) "Which" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

(article sg masc nom ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατὴρ ( noun sg masc nom ) "Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

ἔθετο  ( verb 3rd sg imperf ind mp ) "Hath put" is tithemi which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "o deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," "to bear arms [military]," "to lay down and surrender [military]," "to lay in the grave", "to bury," and "to put words on paper [writing]," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind."

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." 

τῇ (article)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἰδίᾳ ( adj sg fem dat ) "His own" is idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual."

ἐξουσίᾳ, (noun sg fem dat) "Power" is exousia which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power."

KJV Analysis: 

It  -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

for  -- (WW) This word "for"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

you -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

to  -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

know -- "Be known" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

the -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English, an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

times -- "Times" is a word that means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age",  "season", "delay," and "tense."

or -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

the -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

seasons, -- "Seasons" is a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

which -- The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

hath  -- (WT) This helping verb "hath" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past, but this action was started and not completed. 

put -- The Greek wrd translated as "put" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," and "to place," but which has many related meanings as well. The verb is a form that means the subject acts by or for himself.

missing "himself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, by, or on himself. Here, the sense is "by himself."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

his own -- The word translated as "his own" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

power. -- The term translated as "power" isn't the "power" of skill or energy but of authority, control, and the ability to choose.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for you" means "of yours" or "yours,"
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "hath" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is an action started and not completed. 
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

It  -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

for  -- (WW) This word "for"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

you -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

to  -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

know -- "Be known" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

times -- "Times" is a word that means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age",  "season", "delay," and "tense."

or -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

dates, --(WW)  "Dates" is a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

untranslated "which"-- (MW) The untranslated word "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

has  -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past, but this action was started and not completed. 

set -- The Greek wrd translated as "set" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," and "to place," but which has many related meanings as well. The verb is a form that means the subject acts by or for himself.

missing "himself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, by, or on himself. Here, the sense is "by himself."

by -- (WW) The word translated as "by" means "in," "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

his own -- The word translated as "his own" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

authority. -- The term translated as "au" isn't the "power" of skill or energy but of authority, control, and the ability to choose.

NIV Translation Issues: 

6
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" means "of yours" or "yours,"
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "dates" means "season."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "which" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is an action started and not completed. 
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

3rd Analysis: 

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

alone has -- -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "alone has" in the Greek source.

untranslated "in"-- (MW) The untranslated word "in" means "in," "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

untranslated "his own"-- (MW) The untranslated word "his own" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

authority. -- The term translated as "authority" isn't the "power" of skill or energy but of authority, control, and the ability to choose.

to set -- (WF) The Greek wrd translated as "set" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," and "to place," but which has many related meanings as well. The verb is a form that means the subject acts by or for himself. This in not an infinitive by an active verb.

missing "himself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, by, or on himself. Here, the sense is "by himself."

those - (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "those" in the Greek source.

times -- "Times" is a word that means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age",  "season", "delay," and "tense."

and-- (WW) This "and" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

dates, --(WW)  "Dates" is a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

and -- (WW) The word "and" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

they - This is from the third-person form of the verb.

are -- (WN) The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. However, it is singular and not plural.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

for  -- (WW) This word "for"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

you -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

to  -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

know -- "Be known" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

3rd Issue Count: 

12
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "alone has" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "in" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "his own" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to set" is not an infinitive active verb but and active verb, "set."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "by himself" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "those" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" means "this."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "are" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" should be "of."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is an action started and not completed. 
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 24 2020