Acts 1:8 But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Still, you will get a power of a sudden coming of this holy spirit upon you. Not only will you be my witnesses in Jerusalem but both in all the Judea and Samaria also, as far as an extreme of the earth.

KJV : 

Acts 1:8 But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is the final verse of Jesus's sayings. The word translated as "come" is actually an adjective describing the Holy Spirit. Or an adjective describing the power. The Holy Spirit is in a genitive form, not that of a subject. The adjective is also a genitive.

NIV : 

Acts 1:8  But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

3rd Translation: 

Acts 1:8 But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you. And you will be my witnesses, telling people about me everywhere—in Jerusalem, throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

λήμψεσθε (verb 2nd pl fut ind mid) "Ye shall receive" is lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion."

δύναμιν ( noun sg fem acc ) "Power" is dynamis (dunamis), which means "power", "might", "influence", "authority", "capacity", "elementary force", "force of a word," and "value of money." Elemental forces are forces such as heat and cold. -

ἐπελθόντος  [4 verses]( part sg aor act neut gen ) "Is come" is from eperchomai, which means "come upon", "approach", "come suddenly upon", in a hostile sense "come against", "attack", "come forward to speak", "proceed against", "come upon", of time "come on", "go over" [a space], and "traverse". 

τοῦ (article sg neut gen ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -

ἁγίου  ( adj sg neut gen ) "Holy" is hagios, which means "devoted to the gods", "pure", "holy," and on the negative side "accursed."

πνεύματος ( noun sg neut gen ) "Ghost" is pneuma, which means "blast", "wind", "breath", "the breath of life", "divine inspiration", "a spiritual or immaterial being," and "the spirit" of a man.

ἐφ᾽ (prep) "Upon" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

ὑμᾶς, (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔσεσθέ ( verb 2nd pl fut ind mid ) "Ye shall be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

μου (pro sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

μάρτυρες  [2 verses](noun pl masc/fem nom) "Witnesses" is martys, which means "witness," "one giving testimony" and later "martyr."

ἔν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

τε [unique] (partic) "Both" is from te, when used with another te means "both...and." When used with the conjunction kai, as it is here, it points toward that conjuntion as "both" and need not be translated.

Ἰερουσαλὴμ (Name) "Jerusalem" is from Ierousalēm, which is a form of word that denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms, this form and Hierosolyma, in the NT. Luke uses this form. 

καὶ  (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

[ἐν] (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."  -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

πάσῃ () "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τῇ (article sg fem dat )  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

Ἰουδαίᾳ ( noun sg fem dat ) "Judea" is translated from a Greek word  Ioudaia that means "a Jew", "Jewish", "Judea," or "Jewish." Judea represents civilization.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

Σαμαρίᾳ [unique]( noun sg fem dat ) "Samaria" is translated from a Greek word  Samareia that means the area of the region,

καὶ conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

ἕως  (conj) "Unto" is heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that", "as far as,"  and "up to the point that."

ἐσχάτου ( adj sg neut gen ) "Uttermost part" is eschatos. In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending."

τῆς (article sg fem gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

γῆς. ( noun sg fem gen ) "Earth" is ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet.

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

power, -- "Power" is a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry the sense of authority over others, either people or laws.

after that -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "after that" in the Greek source.

untranslated "of"-- (MW) The untranslated word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following words that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the - The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Holy -- The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment. 

Ghost-- The word translated as "ghost" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit. 

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

come -- (CW, WF, WP) "Come" is a Greek verb which means "come upon", especially "coming suddenly upon," "approach", and, in a hostile sense "come against", "attack" or, possibly "overcome." The root word is the word usually translated as "come". This is not an active verb but a verbal adjective, "sudden coming." It appears after power, modifying it, and before the phrase "the holy spirit."

upon -- The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is also the prefix

you: -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be  -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

witness -- "Witnesses " is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus two times.

unto - (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "unto" in the Greek source.

me -- (WF) "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun.

both "-- Both" is from a particle Jesus only uses here that when used with the "and" conjunction as it is here  points toward that conjunction as "both" and need not be translated.

in   -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

Jerusalem, -- This is from the name of the city in Greek letters.

and - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Judaea, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

and- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

in - (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "in" in the Greek source.

Samaria, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

and - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

unto  -- (WW) The word translated as "unto" means "until", "as far as," and "in order that." It does not mean "unto."

the  -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, and there is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

uttermost part -- "Uttermost" is from an adjective that, in space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." It can refer to distance or people so it means "furthest" or "meanest".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

earth. -- The word translated as "earth" means "ground" and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

KJV Translation Issues: 

12
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "after that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is the word "come" with a special prefix.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "coming" doesn't appear here but before "the holy spirit."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "unto" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "me" is not an object but a genitive, "of me."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- This word "in" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "unto" means "as far as."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be an a."

NIV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

power, -- "Power" is a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry the sense of authority over others, either people or laws.

when-- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "when" in the Greek source.

untranslated "of"-- (MW) The untranslated word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following words that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the - The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Holy -- The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment. 

Spirit-- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit.

comes -- (CW, WF, WP) "Comes" is a Greek verb which means "come upon", especially "coming suddenly upon," "approach", and, in a hostile sense "come against", "attack" or, possibly "overcome." The root word is the word usually translated as "come". This is not an active verb but a verbal adjective, "sudden coming." It appears after power, modifying it, and before the phrase "the holy spirit."

on -- The word translated as "on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is also the prefix

you: -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be  -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

my  -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun.

witness -- "Witnesses " is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus two times.

untranslated "both"-- (MW) The untranslated word Both" is from a particle Jesus only uses here that when used with the "and" conjunction as it is here  points toward that conjunction as "both" and need not be translated.

in   -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

Jerusalem, -- This is from the name of the city in Greek letters.

and - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Judaea, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

and- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

Samaria, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

and - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

to  -- (WW) The word translated as "to" means "until", "as far as," and "in order that." It does not mean "unto."

the  -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, and there is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

ends  --(WN)  "Ends" is from an adjective that, in space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." It can refer to distance or people so it means "furthest" or "meanest".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

earth. -- The word translated as "earth" means "ground" and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

NIV Translation Issues: 

11
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "when" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "comes" is the word "come" with a special prefix.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "coming" doesn't appear here but before "the holy spirit."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "both" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "unto" means "as far as."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be an a."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "ends" is translated as plural but it is singular.

3rd Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

power, -- "Power" is a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry the sense of authority over others, either people or laws.

when-- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "when" in the Greek source.

untranslated "of"-- (MW) The untranslated word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following words that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the - The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Holy -- The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment. 

Spirit-- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath", "wind," a "non-material being", and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical". Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit.

comes -- (CW, WF, WP) "Comes" is a Greek verb which means "come upon", especially "coming suddenly upon," "approach", and, in a hostile sense "come against", "attack" or, possibly "overcome." The root word is the word usually translated as "come". This is not an active verb but a verbal adjective, "sudden coming." It appears after power, modifying it, and before the phrase "the holy spirit."

upon -- The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is also the prefix

you: -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be  -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

my  -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun.

witness -- "Witnesses " is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus two times.

telling people about me everywhere -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "telling people about me everywhere" in the Greek source.

untranslated "both"-- (MW) The untranslated word Both" is from a particle Jesus only uses here that when used with the "and" conjunction as it is here  points toward that conjunction as "both" and need not be translated.

in   -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

Jerusalem, -- This is from the name of the city in Greek letters.

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

throughout -- The word translated as "throughout" is from two Greek words meaning "in all." The "in: also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."  The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Judaea, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

in- -- (WW) The Greek word translated "in" is "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

Samaria, -- This is from the name of the region in Greek letters.

and - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

to  -- (WW) The word translated as "to" means "until", "as far as," and "in order that." It does not mean "unto."

the  -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, and there is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

ends  --(WN)  "Ends" is from an adjective that, in space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." It can refer to distance or people so it means "furthest" or "meanest".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

earth. -- The word translated as "earth" means "ground" and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

3rd Issue Count: 

13
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "when" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "comes" is the word "come" with a special prefix.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "coming" doesn't appear here but before "the holy spirit."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "telling people about me everywhere" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "both" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "in" means "and."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "unto" means "as far as."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be an a."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "ends" is translated as plural but it is singular.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 25 2020