John 13:13 Ye call me Master and Lord

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 13:13 Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

You called me [by the names] "the teacher" and "the master" and you choose nobly since I am.

Hidden Meaning: 

The verb translated as "call" (phoneo) means specifically to call someone by name. In Greek imperfect tense, it would usually be translated as the English past tense.

The word translated as "master" (didaskalos) specifically means "teacher." It is from the verb didasko, which means "to teach."

The word translated as "lord" means someone in authority. Though used in the Bible as a title of God, it is also used to describe kings, princes, and house owners. It refer to anyone who is in control, including the owner of the house and specifically the owner of slaves.

The Greek word translated as "say" but it also means "to choose" and "to teach."

The word translated as "good" (kalos) is almost always translated as "good" in the NT, but it means something closer in meaning to "excellent" and "first rate." It is not really connected with the Greek concept of "goodness" as in "good" and "evil."

Vocabulary: 

ὑμεῖς "You" is from hymeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

φωνεῖτέ (2nd pl imperf ind act) "Call" is from phoneo which means "to produce a sound or tone", "to speak loudly or clearly" (of men), "uttering cries" (of animals), "affirm" (in court), "call by name", "command," and "speak of."

με "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

διδάσκαλος "Master" is from didaskalos (didaskalos), which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer."

καί "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κύριος, "Lord" is from kurios (kyrios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

καλῶς "Well" is from kalos (kalos), which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

λέγετε, (2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye say" is from legô (lego) means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," but it used to mean "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command."

εἰμὶ (1st sg pres ind act) "I am" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

γάρ."For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."