Luk 6:21 Blessed are ye that hunger now:

KJV Verse: 

Luk 6:21 Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Lucky, those craving now: because you all are going to be filled. 
Lucky, those weeping now: because you all are going to laugh. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The first part of this verse is a bare bones version of Mat 5:6, while the second part of this verse might be compared to Mat 5:4 (Blessed [are] they that mourn), but the two verses share no key vocabulary. However, one important change for the Beatitudes of Matthew is that these are in the second person, not the third person. (See this article, The Beatitudes, about Matthew's version). Note, both of these initial states are "lacks", the want of something. Notice also the both of these lines lack the verb "are" that connects the English translation. This was also the nature of the Matthew Beatitudes. 

The word "blessed" in Greek is an adjective from a root word meaning "happy" or "fortunate" but with the sense of favored by God. In Christ's era, all luck was attributed to divine favor. It can also mean "wealthy". 

There is no verb "are ye" here. There is just the label "fortunate" put before a group of people. 

The word for "hunger" is the verb for "to hunger" as in needing food and, like the English word, it is a metaphor for any craving. It is in the form of a plural adjective used as a noun, "the ones hungering."

The "for" here is a causal adverb that means "seeing that", "because", or "since."

The Greek word translated in this version as "ye shall be filled" also means "to satisfy" with a close association with the physical satisfaction of eating. Christ uses a bit a humor here, choosing a word that is usually applied to cattle, specifically the fattening of cattle. 

The verb translated as "ye shall weep" means "to weep", "to lament," and "to cry". It is in the form of an adjective, "crying" used as a noun, "those crying". This is plural. 

The verb translated as "shall laugh" means "to laugh" but it covers not just happy laughter. It includes laughing at people and deriding them. Its use is entertaining because so much of what Christ said was designed to make people hearing him laugh. Some of the humor was even used to deride others in a light-hearted way. 

Wordplay: 

The wordplay here is on the surface: your current state leads to its opposite. 

Vocabulary: 

μακάριοι (adj pl masc/fem nom) "Blessed" is from makarios which means "blessed", "prosperous", "happy", "fortunate," and "blissful."

οἱ πεινῶντες  (part pl pres act masc nom) "Ye that hunger" is peino, which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.

νῦν, (adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

ὅτι  (adv) "For" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

χορτασθήσονται. (verb 2nd pl fut ind pass) "Ye shall be filled" is from chortazo, which means "feed", "feast", "fatten" and "to eat their fill." It is a term most commonly used for cattle.

μακάριοι (adj pl masc/fem nom) "Blessed" is from makarios which means "blessed", "prosperous", "happy", "fortunate," and "blissful."

οἱ κλαίοντες  (part pl pres act masc nom)"Are ye that weep" is from klaiowhich means "to weep", "to cry", "to lament," and "to wail."

νῦν, (adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

ὅτι (adv) "For" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

γ​ελάσετε. (verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye shall laugh" is from gelao, which means to "laugh", "laugh at", and "deride".

Related Verses: 

Sep 20 2017