Luk 6:29 And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek

KJV Verse: 

Luk 6:29 And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloke forbid not to take thy coat also.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

To the one striking you against the cheek, furnish also the other and from the one lifting your cloak also an undershirt you don't want to withhold. 

Hidden Meaning: 

Again we see that, though the English translated of this verse and the parallel verses in Matthew (Mat 5:39) look similar, there are key differences in Greek vocabulary. 

There is no Greek word to translate as "and" in the beginning of this verse. 

The Greek verb translated as "unto him that smiteth" means to "beat", "strike", "smite", and "strike oneself." It is in the form of an adjective ("striking") used as a noun, "the one striking". A different word is translated as "smite" in Mat 5:39.

The "thee" here is singular. This is uncommon for Christ when he is teaching, meaning that the line was likely addressed to an individual instead of all his listeners. 

There is no "one" in this verse. 

The Greek word translated as "cheek" means "jaw" or "jawbone." Here and the parallel in Matthew is one of the few places it has been translated as "cheek." 

The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek verb translated as "offer"  means "to hand over", "to furnish", "to supply", "to yield", "to produce" "to present", "to offer" and "to promise."

The Greek word translated as "the other" has a lot of different meanings in Greek that are not part of the English word. In a sense, it means "the reverse" because it means "different", "unreal," and even "bad."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

There is an untranslated word here that means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

"Him that taketh away" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."

The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun.

The word translated as "cloke" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status.

The Greek verb translated as "forbid"  means "to hinder", "withhold," and "to prevent."

The "not" negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

"Coat" is the Greek word means an undergarment, not an over garment. Christ is literally saying, "Don't take two pairs of underwear." There is a certain humor in this that seems intentional.

Wordplay: 

Much of the wordplay in the Matthew versions of the first part is lost, but in the later part Christ creates a humorous image that is similar to the English saying, "giving someone the shirt off your back."

Vocabulary: 

τῷ τύπτοντί [uncommon] (part sg pres act masc dat) "Unto him that smiteth" is from typto, which means to "beat", "strike", "smite", and "strike oneself."

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun. 

ἐπὶ (prep) "On" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τὴν σιαγόνα (noun sg fem acc ) "Cheek" is from siagōn, which means "jaw", "jaw-bone," and "cheek."

πάρεχε [uncommon](verb 2nd sg pres imperat act) "Offer"  is parecho, which means "to hand over", "to furnish", "to supply", "to yield", "to produce", "to cause", "to present", "to offer", "to allow", "to grant", "to render," and "to promise."

καὶ (conj) "Also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you).

τὴν ἄλλην, (adj sg fem acc) "The other" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," {with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you).

ἀπὸ (prep)  Untranslated is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. 

τοῦ αἴροντός (part sg pres act masc gen) "Him that taketh away" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." 

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is sou which means "you" and "your." 

τὸ ἱμάτιον (noun sg neut acc) "Cloke" is himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth." --

καὶ "Also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). 

τὸν χιτῶνα "Coat" is chiton, which means "the garment worn next to the skin", "tunic [a men's]", "a coating", "a covering", "a membrane [anatomical]", "the upper part of a show", "vesture," and "coat of mail." 

μὴ (conj) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. As a conjunction means "lest perchance". 

κωλύσῃς. (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Forbid" is from kolyo, which means "to hinder", "withhold," and "to prevent."

Related Verses: 

Sep 30 2017