Luk 7:25 But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment?

KJV Verse: 

Luk 7:25 But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? Behold, they which are gorgeously apparelled, and live delicately, are in kings' courts.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Still, what did you go out to see? A man in a soft cloak having wrapped himself? You see the ones in a cloak respectable--and it is dainty--already existing. In king's palaces, they are.  

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse begins like Mat 11:8 , but it ends with a phrase using many unusual and unique words for Jesus. The last phrase also has a few linguistic puzzles.  As with the Matthew verse, a number of these words have a double meaning as "morally debased" and even "effeminate".

The word translated as "went ye out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true."

The verb translated as "to see" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive."

"Clothed" is a verb in the form of an adjective ("clothing") that means "to put on" or "to put around" so "wrapping". It is also used to mean "to dress oneself in." It is not an active verb, as shown in the KJV. It is in a form where the subject acts on himself, "wrapping himself". Its form matches "a man" so "a man wrapping himself".

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." This preposition appears before the word translated as "clothed".

"Soft" is a Greek adjective used to mean soft and gentle in both a good sense and a bad, soft pillow, good, soft man, bad. It was used specifically to describe men as effeminate and morally debased.

The word translated as "raiment" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status. This word did not appear in Matthew version, 

"Behold" is an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!"

The word translated as "they" is an article, used without a noun, so it has the sense of "the ones".

The word translated as "which" is a preposition meaning "in". 

The Greek word translated as "are appareled" is not a verb, but the same noun that is translated as "rainment" above. It means an outer garment ("a cloak") like we would use a coat or jacket today.

The word translated as "gorgeously" is an adjective meaning  "held in esteem or honour", "of high repute",  and and "generally admitted".  It works like our word "respectable". It is in the same form as the "cloak" above. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "delicately" or perhaps "live delicately" could be an adjective "delicate" or a verb "to live luxuriously" and "to be delicate". The problem with the adjective form is that its form doesn't match any noun. The problem with the verb is that it is singular, not plural so it cannot refer to the "they". The only translation that works is that if it refers to the cloak and means "it is dainty" not "live delicately", This make is a funny aside of someone acting out what he is saying.  This is a unique word for Jesus in the Gospels. 

A verb appears here that is either translated as "live" or is untranslated. It means to "take the initiative",  "to be already in existence", and many other meanings. It is plural, so it works with the "they", and it is in the form of an adjective, so "already existing." This is a unique word for Jesus in the Gospels. 

The "are" verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The noun translated as "kings' courts" means "palaces" and similar ideas. This is the only time it is used in the NT, but it is a form of the frequently used word meaning "king". 

 

Wordplay: 

Many unusual words meaning "morally debased" as well as "soft". 

Vocabulary: 

ἀλλὰ  (adv) "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

τί (pron sg neut nom ) What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what.

ἐξήλθατε (2nd pl aor ind act) "Went ye" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true."

ἰδεῖν;  (aor inf act) "To see" is from eidon which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

ἄνθρωπον  (noun sg masc acc) "A man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in the plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐν  (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

μαλακοῖς (adj pl neut dat) "Soft" is from malakos, which means "freshly plowed," but it was used for a lot of ideas for gentleness and softness such as sleeping softly, sitting on a soft pillow, and soft grass. It is used to mean "soft" in a negative sense, for the idea of faint-hearted, and cowardly and lacking self-control. It was used specifically to describe men as effeminate and morally debased.

ἱματίοις (noun pl neut dat) "Raiment" is himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth."

ἠμφιεσμένον;  (part sg perf mp neut nom/acc) "Clothed" is from amphiennumi, which means "to put on" or "to put around." It is also used to mean "to dress oneself in."

ἰδοὺ  (verb 2nd sg aor ind mid or verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is from idou , which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἐν (prep)"Which" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". 

ἱματισμῷ (noun sg masc dat) "Are apparelled" is himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth." -- The word translated as "garment" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status.

ἐνδόξῳ [unique](adj sg masc dat) "Gorgeously" is endoxoswhich means "held in esteem or honour", "of high repute",  of things, "notable",  "resting on opinion", "probable", and "generally admitted". 

καὶ (conj)"And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τρυφῇ [unique](noun sg fem dat) "Delicately" is  tryphe, which means  "softness", "delicacy", "daintiness", "luxuriousness", and "wantonness". OR (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Live delicately" is  tryphe, which means "to live luxuriously", "fare sumptuously", "to be licentious", "run riot", "wax wanton", "give oneself airs", and "be dainty and fastidious". 

ὑπάρχοντες [uncommon](part pl pres act masc nom) "Live" is from hyparcho, which means to "begin", "take the initiative", "to be the beginning", "to be already in existence", "to be laid down", "to be taken for granted", "belong to", "fall to one", "accrue",  of persons, "to be devoted to one",  "existing circumstances", "present advantages", and "the fact is that".  

ἐν (prep)"In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τοῖς βασιλείοις [unique](noun pl neut dat) "Kings' courts. " is from basileus, which means "kingly dwelling", "palace", "royal treasury", "seat of empire", and "capital."

εἰσίν. (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

Related Verses: 

Oct 30 2017