Luk 7:46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint:

KJV Verse: 

Luk 7:46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

With oil, this head of mine you did not grease. She, however, with perfume has anointed these feet of mine. 

Hidden Meaning: 

There are three contrasts here: the oil and the "ointment" (perfume), the head and feet, and the "you" and the "she".   As a simple reflection of reality, the head was considered the highest and most honored part of the body, while feet were considered the lowest and least clean part of the body.Fittingly, the head was put towards the beginning of the verse and the feet and the end.  Of course, this simply reflected reality. The oil and the perfume were both put toward the beginning as both good things. The "she" was at the beginning and the "you" at the end. 

The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

 "With oil" is from a noun that means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance." The "with" comes from the form of the word which indicates it as something used to do something, an instument. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The word translated as "thou didst...anoint" means putting oil on your skin after washing. This was a traditional Jewish practice to protect the exposed skin of the face and neck from the sun. It was especially important to do on special occasions when it was considered part of good grooming.

The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, after "she" in this case, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

The word translated as "she" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The word translated as "anoint" means putting oil on your skin after washing. this is the same word as above. 

The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things. It was the Jewish

"Ointment" is a noun that means "sweet oil" and "perfume".

Wordplay: 

The contrast between honoring the head and the feet. 

Vocabulary: 

 ἐλαίῳ  (noun sg masc dat)  "With oil" is from elaion, which means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance." 

τὴν κεφαλήν (noun sg fem acc) "Head" is kephalê (kephale), which means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing.

μου (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is mou, which means "me", and "mine". -- "Me" is the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

οὐκ (partic)"Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἤλειψας:  (verb 2nd sg aor ind act)"Thou didst...anoint" is from aleiphowhich means "to anoint the skin with oil [as was done after bathing]", "anointing for gymnastic exercises", "of anointing [the sick]", "to supply oil for gymnasts", "to attend a gymnastic school", "to prepare as if for gymnastics,""to encourage", "to stimulate", "to instigate", "to daub", "to plaster", "to besmear,"and "to stop up ears."

 αὕτη (adj sg fem nom) "She" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord." 

δὲ (conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -

μύρῳ (noun sg neut dat) "Ointment" is from myron, which means "sweet oil", "unguent", "perfume", and it is a metaphor for anything graceful or charming. -- 

ἤλειψεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act )"Anoint" is from aleiphowhich means "to anoint the skin with oil [as was done after bathing]", "anointing for gymnastic exercises", "of anointing [the sick]", "to supply oil for gymnasts", "to attend a gymnastic school", "to prepare as if for gymnastics,""to encourage", "to stimulate", "to instigate", "to daub", "to plaster", "to besmear,"and "to stop up ears."

τοὺς πόδας (noun pl masc acc ) "Feet" is pous, which means a "foot", "a talon [of a bird]," and the concept of "to trample" or "to tred upon." 

μου.(noun sg masc gen) "Me" is mou, which means "me", and "mine". -- "Me" is the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

Related Verses: 

Nov 15 2017