Luk 8:14 And that which fell among thorns are they,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 8:14 And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

The one, however, into the thorns falling, these are those having heard and under wealth and pleasures of making a living, bringing yourself out,  they choke themselves and don't produce achievement. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek word translated as "and" is the Greek word commonly translated as "but" because it joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

"That which" is from the Greek article, "the," (neuter, singular referring to a seed) which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

"Fell" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall" and "to fall down." It is the root word for dozens of Greek terms involving moving from a higher state to a lower one. Like our word "to fall" it has a number of special meanings including "to fall into a given class", "to prostrate", "to fall from power", "to perish," and so on. Here, it is in the form which indicates someone acting on themselves, so "lower themselves down."

The word translated as "among" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure. 

"Thorns" is a noun which means "thorns", "prickle" or a thorny or prickly plant. As in English, the term "thorny" is used as a metaphor for "difficult", "tricky," or "painful" as in "a thorny question."

The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

"They" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." In the plural, it is "these" or "those". 

The word translated as "which they" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). Here the form is plural so "those". See this article for more. 

There is no "when" in the Greek. 

"They have heard" is a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. However, it is in the form of an adjective in the past, "having heard."

The Greek verb translated as "go forth" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." Since it is in a form that acts on itself, the sense is "take yourselves". 

"Are choked" is a verb that means "to press closely" in the sense of crowding, and "to damp down." It is not in the passive, but in a form where the subject acts on themselves, "have crushed themselves down". 

The word translated as "with" primarily means "by", "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. "Under" makes the most sense with the verb "crushed down" used above.

"Cares" is translated from a Greek word that means "care", "thought" or "concern." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. However, it is single, not plural.

There is no "this" in the Greek modifying the word translated as "life". 

The Greek word translated as "life" means "making a living" in the sense of supporting yourself and your family. It is not the Greek  word normally translated as "life". See this article about that word and related terms. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

Vocabulary: 

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "That" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

δὲ  (partic) "And" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

εἰς (prep) "Among " is from eis, which means "into (of place), ""up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὰς ἀκάνθας (noun pl fem acc) "The thorns" is akantha, which means "thorns", "prickly" or a thorny or prickly plant. As in English, the term "thorny" is used as a metaphor for difficult, as in "a thorny question."

πεσόν, (part sg aor act neut acc) "That which fell" is the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)." 

οὗτοί (adj pl masc nom) "They" is from houtos, which means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such and extent," and "that is why." --

εἰσιν    (verb 3rd pl pres) "Are" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") 

οἱ  (article pl masc nom) "Which" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

ἀκούσαντες,  (part pl aor act masc nom) "Have heard" is from akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." -

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὑπὸ (prep) "With" is hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by", "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

μεριμνῶν (noun pl fem gen) "Cares" is from merimna , which means "care", "thought", "solicitude", "object of care or thought," and, in plural, "pursuit", "ambition."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πλούτου (noun sg masc gen) "Riches" is from ploutos, which is used only once in Matthew to descrive wealth. It means "wealth ""treasure," and "riches." The verb is pletho, which means "to fill. ""Plutus" is the god of riches.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἡδονῶν [uncommon](noun pl fem gen) "Pleasures" are from hedone, which means "enjoyment", "pleasure", "a pleasure", in plural, "desires after pleasure", and "pleasant lusts".

τοῦ βίου [uncommon](noun sg masc gen) "Of this life" is from bios (bios), which means "mode of life", "livelihood", "means of living", "the world we live in", "a biography," and "caste." 

πορευόμενοι (part pl pres mp masc nom) "Go forth" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

συνπνίγονται (verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Are choked" is from sympigno, which "to press closely," in the sense of crowding, "to damp down," and metaphorically, "to choke."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

τελεσφοροῦσιν [unique](verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Fruit to perfection" is from telesphoreo, which means "bring fruit to perfection", of young women, "bear perfect offspring", generally, "bring to a head", and, in the passive,  "to be brought to perfection." 

Related Verses: 

Nov 27 2017