Luke 11:22 But when a stronger than he shall come upon him,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:22 But when a stronger than he shall come upon him, and overcome him, he taketh from him all his armour wherein he trusted, and divideth his spoils.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

When, however, one stronger than he attacking conquers him. That armor of his, he removes. Upon it, he had relied and that stripped armor of his, he hands over. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The KJV assumes that the one stronger man is the main actor here. In the Greek, it is clear that man who is conquered is the one stripping off his armor and passing it on. If we do not assume that, it is hopelessly confused in terms of parsing out to whom all the pronouns and adjectives refer.  Almost all the key nouns and verbs here are uncommon for Jesus to use. One is unique, used only here. 

The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

"A stronger" is an adjective used as a noun. The adjective means "strong", "mighty," and "violent." So it means "of a strong one" or "of a violent one." The form is comparative, that is "stronger". It is the same adjective used for the "strong man" in the previous verse (Luke 11:21). 

The word translated as "than he" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same". The form is possessive "of his", but when used with a comparative like "stronger" it has the meaning of "than he". 

"Shall come upon" is a Greek verb which means "come upon", "approach", and, in a hostile sense "come against", "attack". The root word is the word usually translated as "come". The sense is obviously hostile, "come against" but there is no "him" here. The form is an adjective, "attacking". This is an uncommon word for Jesus, used only one other place. 

There is no "him" in the Greek source following "coming against". 

There is no "and" since there is only one active verb, the following one. 

The Greek verb translated as "overcome"  means "to conquer", "to prevail", "to be superior", "to succeed", "to vanquish," and "to overpower." This is the sentences active verb. The "stronger one" is the subject. 

There is a "him" in the Greek. It clearly refers to the one conquered. 

The Greek word translated as "armor" means a complete suit of armor. This word is used by Jesus only once. 

The word translated as "he taketh" means "to lift" or "to remove". The context strongly indicates that the conquered man removes his own armor because the subject of the next verb, also unspecified, is clearly the conquered man. 

"Wherein" is translated from two Greek words meaning "upon that". The "that" is in a form that clearly refers to the armor". 

Another uncommon verb is translated as "he trusted". It means "persuade", "obey", "prevail upon", "talk over", "mislead," and "tempt (with food), "believed", "trusted", and "relied upon".  The subject is clearly the conquered man. 

The "and" is the common conjunction. 

The "divideth" is another uncommon verb that means "pass on", "hand over", "distribute", "to be handed down by tradition", and "spread about".  Again, using the most common meaning, the subject is the conquered many "passing on" or "handing over" his armor. 

The Greek noun translated as "spoils" specifically means armor that has been removed. 

Vocabulary: 

ἐπὰν (adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)." 

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

ἰσχυρότερος (adj sg masc nom comp) "A stronger man" is  ischyros, which means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful." It is from ischys, meaning strength. Here is seems as though it is used to refer to demons that control people.

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Than he"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐπελθὼν  [uncommon](part sg aor act masc nom) "Shall come upon him" is from aperchomai, which means "come upon", "approach", "come suddenly upon", in a hostile sense "come against", "attack", "come forward to speak", "proceed against", "come upon", of time "come on", "go over" [a space], and "traverse". 

νικήσῃ [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Overcome" is from nikao (nikao), which means "to conquer", "to prevail", "to be superior", "to succeed", "to vanquish," and "to overpower."

αὐτόν,  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

τὴν πανοπλίαν [unique](noun sg fem acc ) "Armor" is panoplia, which means a "suit of armor". 

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

αἴρει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "He taketh" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." 

ἐφ᾽ (prep) "Wherein" is epi, (with hos below) which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against." 

(pron sg fem dat) "Where in" is hos, (with epi below) which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἐπεποίθει, [uncommon](verb 3rd sg plup ind act) "He trusted" is from  peitho, which means "persuade", "obey", "prevail upon", "talk over", "mislead," and "tempt (with food), "believed", "trusted", and "relied upon". 

 καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὰ σκῦλα [unique](noun pl neut acc) "Spoils" is from skylon, which means "arms stripped off a slain enemy", "spoils", and "booty". 

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

διαδίδωσιν. [uncommon](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Divideth" is diadidomi, which means "pass on", "hand over", "distribute", "to be handed down by tradition", and "spread about". 

Related Verses: 

Feb 21 2018