Luke 11:25 And when he cometh, he findeth it swept and garnished.

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:25 And when he cometh, he findeth it swept and garnished.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And, having arrived, it discovers it [being unoccupied], having been swept and arranged. 

Hidden Meaning: 

In the Greek, this verse is identical to Matthew 12:44 except that some versions of Greek do not have the "empty" adjective appearing in Matthew that precedes the "swept" and "garnished". 

The "and's" in this section are a good example of a place where the "not only/but also" translation works best.

The three adjectives in this last section ("empty, swept, and garnished") are all verbs in the past tense that are in the form of an adjective where the verb acts on itself. Examples are given below.

The Greek word translated as "empty" means "having not occupied himself" both in the sense "having found nothing to do" and, of a place, "not having an occupant." Since it refers to a person who an "evil spirit" has left, it has both the sense not finding another better to take its place and the person having nothing else to do, as in "idle hands are the devil's playground." This word does not appear in some Greek texts. 

The Greek word translated as "swept" means "having swept himself clean" and "having exhausted himself."

The Greek word translated as "garnished" means "having ordered himself", "having adorned himself", "having honored himself," or, in the more common passive form, "having ascribed to himself."

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (prep) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐλθὸν (part sg aor act neut nom or verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "When he is come" is from erchomai, which means "to start, ""to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

εὑρίσκει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "He findeth" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

[σχολάζοντα,] (part sg pres act masc acc) "Empty" is the verb, scholazô, which means "to loiter", "to be at leisure", "to have spare time", "to have nothing to do", "to loiter linger, "to have rest or respite", "to devote one's time to a thing," of a place: "to be vacant", "unoccupied", "to be reserved for," and, of students, "to devote oneself to learning: hence, give lectures."

σεσαρωμένον (part sg perf mp masc acc) "Swept" is saroô, which means "to sweep", "to clean", "sweep clean," and, metaphorically, "to be exhausted."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κεκοσμημένον. (part sg perf mp masc acc) "Garnished" is kosmeô, which means "arrange", "order", "prepare", "adorn", "equip", "adorn", "dress", "embellish", "honour," and, in the passive, "to be assigned," and "to ascribed to."

Related Verses: 

Feb 24 2018