Luke 11:49 Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles

KJV Verse: 

Luke 11:49 Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

By this also the wisdom of the Divine said, "I will dispatch for them shining lights and messengers also out of them. They are going to destroy and hound them. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse shortens the version in Matthew 23:34, but it is very odd because it seems to be quoting one of the "wisdom" books of the OT (Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs (Song of Solomon), Job, and Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)) but this quote is not found in the Septuagint, which is clearly the source of all of the other quotes Jesus cites. 

"Wherefore" is from two Greek words, meaning "through this" or "by this."

The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek word for "wisdom" means "cleverness", "skill," and "learning." This was seen as an attribute of God and a gift from God to men. Sophia was the Greek goddess of learning and in Christianity is used as a symbol for Mary, the mother of Jesus. However, this was also used to describe a set of books in the Septuagint, the Greek version of the OT, (Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs (Song of Solomon), Job, and Ecclesiasticus (Sirach))

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jeusus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. Christ uses it to describe speaking. To describe the OT, he usually uses the word translated as "written". This is some evidence that he was not referring to the written books of wisdom but perhaps to a personal revelation. 

The "I will send" here is a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle." 

The word meaning "into" is left untranslated here. It means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure. This is a contrast to the word used later that means the opposite "out of". 

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God", "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople but their books in the OT. It is from the verb that means "to shine before."

"Apostles" is the Greek noun that is our source for the word, apostoloswhich means "messenger", "ambassador", "envoy", "order for dispatch," and "cargo dispatched by order." Jesus seldom uses this Greek noun, but often uses its verb form, which he does above. 

The Greek preposition translated as "some of" means "out of" or "from." It is the opposite of the idea of "into" above.

 The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

"They shall kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

The word translated as "persecute" means both "chase away" and "seek after." The English idea "hound" comes close.

Wordplay: 

The apostles are sent "into them" and killed "out of" them. 

Vocabulary: 

διὰ (prep) "Therefore" is from dia (with touto below) hich means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." 

τοῦτο (adj sg neut acc) "Therefore" is from touto, (with dia above) which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

καὶ (conj/adv) "also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

σοφία  (noun sg fem nom) "Wisdom" is from sophia, which means "cleverness", "skill," and "learning." This was seen as an attribute of God and a gift from God to men. Sophia was the Greek goddess of learning and in Christianity is used as a symbol for Mary, the mother of Jesus.

τοῦ θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Said" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." 

Ἀποστελῶ (verb 1st sg fut ind act t) "I will send" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

εἰς (prep)Untranslated s eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

αὐτοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

προφήτας (noun pl masc acc or noun sg masc nom verb 2nd sg fut ind act) "The prophets" is from prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will", "interpreter", "keepers of the oracle", "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt", "interpreter," and "herald." It is a verb that means "to shine forth" It is a form of the verb, prophao. which means "to shine forth," or "to shine before." -

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀποστόλους, [uncommon] (noun pl masc acc) "Apostles" is from apostoloswhich means "messenger", "ambassador", "envoy", "order for dispatch," and "cargo dispatched by order." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐξ "Some of" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." --

αὐτῶν (adj pl masc gen ) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀποκτενοῦσιν (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "They shall kill" is from apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying").

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

δ ιώξουσιν, (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "Persecute" is from diôkô (dioko), which means "to cause to run", "to set into motion", "to pursue", "to chase [away]," to follow", "to seek after," "to be hurried (passive)," "to urge on", "to prosecute [legally]", " or "to drive."

Related Verses: 

Mar 16 2018