Luke 17:21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 17:21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Nether will they say, "See here or there!" Tah-Dah! Because this realm of this Deity? Inside of you all? It exists!

Hidden Meaning: 

Again, this verse look much more like an answer to a question. It works verbally much better than a written statement. The beginning "they will say" seems to repeat part of the question. Again, the effect is largely humorous.

The Greek word for "neither" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even". As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions. 

"Shall they say" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

"Lo" is an verb meaning "Behold!"  and "See there!" Ii is also an adverbial introducing a reveal like  we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or the French "voila". In a humorous vein, Jesus uses this like word both ways, like  "Look!" or "Tah-dah!".  This first use is more like "See!" It is a form of the common verb that means "to see" or "to perceive."

The word translated as "here" means in manner, "in this way," referring to manner, or "here," referring to place.

"Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

"Lo" is the same verb/adv described above, but it doesn't exist here. The word is used later in the sentence. This "lo" is added.

"There" is a word meaning "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world." It follows the "or" so "Look here or there!".

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence. However, since this word always appears in the second position in the phrase, it is more like an aside remark like, "as an explanation" or "as a cause". 

"Behold" is an verb meaning "Behold!"  and "See there!" It is also an adverbial exclamation introducing a reveal like  we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or the French "voila". In a humorous vein, Jesus uses this like word both ways, like  "Look!" or "Tah-dah!".  This second use is more like the adverb, "Tah-Dah!"

The word translated as "the kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods. The :"of" comes from the possessive form.

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It ends the sentence.

The "within" is not a reposition, but adverb but Jesus uses it like a noun. As in English, this word had the sense of "insider" and "being special" in contrast to "outsider" and "being common."

The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners so the sense is "inside of you all".

The Spoken Version: 

"No one can say what this realm of the Deity look like!" the Pharisee elder demanded.

"Nether will they say, 'Look here or there!'" the Nazarene explained,  pointing here and there. Then gesturing toward the group of Pharisees, he exclaimed, "Tah-Dah! Because this realm of this Deity? Inside of you all, it exists!

 

Vocabulary: 

οὐδὲ (partic) "Neither" is oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not", "neither", and "nor." As an adverb, it means "not at all" and "not even."

ἐροῦσιν ( verb 3rd pl fut ind act ) "Shall they say" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

Ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) ""Lo" is idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ὧδε adv) "Here" is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here."

(conj/adv) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

Ἐκεῖ: (adv) "There" is ekei, which means "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world." --

ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Of  God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." --

ἐντὸς (adverb) "Within" is from entos, which means "within", "inside", "on this side", "acquainted with," of time "within", "short of," i.e. "before."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "You" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐστίν. ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act )"Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

Related Verses: 

Sep 19 2018