Luke 18:24 How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!

KJV Verse: 

Luke 18:24  How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

How peevishly the ones these properties possessing into the realm of the Divine are lead by themselves!

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse has a great deal of humor that the KJV translation ignores.  Mark 10:23 is identical except for the "enter". The similar verse of Matthew 19:23 is noticeably different/

"How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

"Hardly" is the keyword here. It is an adjective that means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain." The form of the word is an adverb. As an adverb, it would mean "peevishly" or "fretfully".

There is no "shall" in the Greek. The tense of the "enter" is present.

The word translated as "they" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. The form is plural, so "those" or "the ones".

The word translated as "have" means to "that have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep". The form is an adjective, "having". It pairs with the article above.

"Riches" is the noun that means "need", "goods", "property", "money", and so on. It is plural with an article so "these properties".

"Enter " is a verb that means  "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It is in a form where the subject is acted upon by itself, "are lead by themselves in".

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods. It is possessive so "of the Divine".

Vocabulary: 

Πῶς (adv/conj) "How" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any means", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

δυσκόλως  (adv/adj pl masc acc) "Hardly" is from dyskolos, which means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain."

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

τὰ χρήματα ( noun pl neut nom/acc) "Riches" is from chrêma (chrema), which means "need", "goods", "property", "money", "merchandise", "substance", "thing", "matter", "affair", "a deal," and "a heap of."

ἔχοντες ( part pl pres act masc nom ) "Have" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν βασιλείαν (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ θεοῦ (noun masc sg gen) "of God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

εἰσπορεύονται: ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp )  "Enter" is eisporeuo, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

Related Verses: 

Oct 23 2018