Luke 19:21 For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man:

KJV Verse: 

Luke 19:21 For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

I feared is the reason, you, because a man harsh you are. You carry off what you didn't place and reap what you didn't seed.

Hidden Meaning: 

This is a good example of how the Greek ability to reverse the word order of a "because" phrase matters. This verse has not one byt two words that can be translated as "because".

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like the statement "is the reason"  or "for this cause".

"I feared" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." I

 The "thee" here is singular second-person pronoun.

The word translated as "because" introduces a statement of fact or cause. It is also translated as "for" but this word always begins its clause.

The verb "thou art" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It appears at the end of the phrase.

"Austere" is an adjective that Jesus only uses in this story. It means "harsh", :rough" and "bitter".

The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

"Thou takest up" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."Christ uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross.

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. The form is singular neutral.

 The Greek word translated as "thou layedst...down" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," and "to place," but which has many related meanings as well. This verb is in a form that indicates it is possible but not certain.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

The Greek word translated as "reapest" means "to do summer work" and "to reap."

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. The form is singular neutral.

The Greek word translated as "thou didst...sow" means specifically to "sow seeds" and "to scatter" as in sowing seeds.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

Vocabulary: 

ἐφοβούμην ( verb 1st sg imperf ind mp ) "Fear" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something."

γάρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun. --

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "Man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

αὐστηρὸς [only this story]( adj sg masc nom ) "Austere" is austēros, which means "harsh", "rough" and "bitter".

εἶ,   (verb 2nd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

αἴρεις () "Thou takest up" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." --

( pron sg neut acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔθηκας  ( verb 2nd sg aor ind act ) "Thou layest...down" is tithemi which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "o deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," "to bear arms [military]," "to lay down and surrender [military]," "to lay in the grave", "to bury," and "to put words on paper [writing]," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind." -- 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θερίζεις ( verb 2nd sg pres ind act ) "Repeast" is therizô (therizo), which means "to do summer work", "to reap", "to mow", "to cut off," and, in some areas, "to plunder." --

( pron sg neut acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔσπειρας. ( verb 2nd sg aor ind act ) "Thou didst...sow" is speiro, which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field." --

Related Verses: 

Nov 14 2018