Luke 20:15 So they cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him.

KJV Verse: 

Luke 20:15 So they cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him. What therefore shall the lord of the vineyard do unto them?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And tossing out him, out of the vineyard, they destroyed. What the should he do to them, that lord of the vineyard?

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse is very straight forward.

The Greek word translated as "so" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"They cast " is a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.  It contains the prefix meaning "out".  It is in the form of an adjective, not an active verb, "tossing out".

 The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

The word translated as "out" means "out of a place" and "outside." This word already exists in the prefix of the verb so it is repeated in this verse for verbal or humorous emphasis.

 "Of the vineyard" is the Greek word that means "vineyard."  The "of the" comes from the form of the word and the article before it.

There is no "and" here, because the only active verb is the following one.

"Killed" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way.

There is no "him" here, but Greek does not repeat pronouns as much as we do in English.

The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

The Greek word translated as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative.

The Greek word translated as "shall...do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. The form could either be the future tense or a mood indicating something that might happen. The sense is either "what will he do" or "what should he do" depending on the tone of voice.

The word translated as "the lord" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

 "Of the vineyard" is the Greek word that means "vineyard."  The "of the" comes from the form of the word and the article before it.

The word translated as "unto them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The "unto" comes from the form as an indirect object.

 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "So" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐκβαλόντες ( part pl aor act masc nom ) "The caste" is ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter." --

αὐτὸν   (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἔξω (adv) "Out" is exo, which means "out of a place", "outside", "external things," and "beyond a time."

τοῦ ἀμπελῶνος (noun sg masc gen) "Of the vineyard" is ampelon which means simply "vineyard."

ἀπέκτειναν. ( verb 3rd pl aor ind act ) "Killed" is apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying"). --

τί ( irreg sg neut nom ) "What" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

οὖν (adv) "Therefore" is oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore."

ποιήσει ( verb 3rd sg aor subj act or verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall...do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to perform", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

αὐτοῖς (adj pl masc dat) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

κύριος (noun sg masc nom) "The lord" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." --

τοῦ ἀμπελῶνος; (noun sg masc gen) "Vineyard" is ampelon which means simply "vineyard."

Related Verses: 

Dec 7 2018