Luke 20:25 Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesar's,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 20:25 Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesar's, and unto God the things which be God's.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Well then, give back "any things", of Caesar to Caesar, and "any things", of the Divine to the Divine.

Hidden Meaning: 

This is one of those verse where Christ demonstrates both his depth of understanding and his cleverness with words. The original Greek is much shorter, because it doesn't have the cumbersome phrase, "the things which are" in it, but instead, a single short word. This verse follows the common pattern of Christ's sayings, repeating two phrases with one change between them. Here the duplicated phrase also repeats its key word.

The word translated as "render" means "to give back." In a financial sense, to "pay back." This word is translated "deliver" and "reward" elsewhere in the NT.

The Greek word translated as "therefore" is a word used uniquely here by Jesus. It means "well, then" when answering a question. It starts the verse. Matthew has a common word meaning "therefore" in this position.

The Greek word translated as "the things which are" in the plural means  "any things", "everything", "some", "they," and "those." Here, it is plural.

The word translated as "Caesar" meant primarily Julius but also Augustus and, generally, "the emperor." Tiberius, who followed Augustus, was emperor curing Christ's ministry. This word is repeated, on as the one possessing ownership and second as the receiver of the giving.

The only difference between the "the thing which are of God" phrase is the change of Caesar to God. It is worth noting, however, that often when Christ says God, he says it with the article, that is "The God." He does that here with the first statement of God, but not the second.

Vocabulary: 

Τοίνυν [unique](particle) "Therefore" is toinyn, which means "therefore", "accordingly", and, in dialogue to introduce an answer, well then".

ἀπόδοτε  (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Render" is from apodidomi which means "to give back", "to restore," and "to deliver." It has the economic sense of "to sell" or "to give something for one's own profit." It begins with apo the preposition of separation and origin, the idea of "from" in English, didômi which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," and "to describe."

τὰ (irreg pl neut acc) "The things which are" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what.

Καίσαρος (noun sg masc gen) "Caesar" is from Kaisar (Kaisar), which means "Caesar" primarily Julius but also Augustus and, generally, "the emperor."

Καίσαρι (noun sg masc dat) "Caesar" is from Kaisar, which means "Caesar" primarily Julius but also Augustus and, later, generally, "the emperor."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὰ (irreg pl neut acc) "The things which are" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what.

τοῦ θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

τῷ θεῷ. (noun sg masc dat) "God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Related Verses: 

Dec 13 2018