Luke 5:39 No man also having drunk old wine straightway

KJV Verse: 

Luke 5:39 No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

No one having drunk old wants new because he says, "The old is good!" 

Hidden Meaning: 

This line doesn't appear in Matthew or Mark, which basically parallels this section of Luke. It also doesn't appear in the earliest Greek manuscripts of Luke. In the metaphorical meaning of this parable, this would mean that people initially prefer the old to the new. 

The Greek word translated "no men" means "nothing" and "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

The word "having drunk" seems chosen for its double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate." Here, it is a part participle. 

The Greek word translated as "desireth" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". 

The word translated as "old" means old in years both in a good sense and a bad one. In a good sense, it means "venerable" and in a bad sense, "obsolete." It is the same term used to describe the clothing in the last verse. In the previous verse, the reference seems positive because the concern is for preserving the cloak. That is also a concern here: preserving the skins.

There is no Greek source for the word "wine".

There is no greek source for the word "straightway".

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation. To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The word translated as "he saith" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number " or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.  

"The old" is the same word as above meaning both "old" and "venerated". 

The word translated as "easy" actually means "good" in many different senses of the word. In a moral sense, it is the opposite of the Greek word that really means "bad" and "evil," but which is not the word usually translated as "evil" in the NT. For more on this topic, see this article.

Wordplay: 

The word "drink" means "to celebrate". 

Vocabulary: 

Οὐδεὶς (adj sg masc nom) "No man" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

πιὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Having drunk" is pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

παλαιὸν (adj sg neut acc) "Old" is from palaios, which means "old in years," "ancient," (in a good sense) "venerable", "held in esteem," (in a bad way) "antiquated", "obsolete," and "in an old way."

θέλει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Desireth" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain", "to hold", "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly".   

νέον: (adj sg neut acc) "New" is from neos, which means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". and as an adverb of time, "lately", "just now", " anew ," and " afresh ,"

λέγει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "He saith" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." 

γάρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

παλαιὸς (adj sg neut nom) "Old" is from palaios, which means "old in years," "ancient," (in a good sense) "venerable", "held in esteem," (in a bad way) "antiquated", "obsolete," and "in an old way."

χρηστός [uncommon](adj sg masc nom) "Better" is chrestos, which means "good", "useful", "good of its kind," and "serviceable;" of persons, "good", "kindly;" "honest", "worthy," in war, "valiant", "true;" of the gods, "propitious", "merciful", "bestowing health or wealth;" of a man, "strong", "able in body for sexual intercourse;" when used as a now, "benefits", "kindnesses", "happy event", "prosperity," and "success.;" in a moral sense, it is the opposite of kakos, which means "bad" and "evil," but which is not the word usually translated as "evil" in the NT. For more on this topic, see this article.  

ἐστιν.] (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." 

Related Verses: 

Sep 8 2017