Luke 8:18 Take heed therefore how ye hear: for whosoever hath, to him shall be given;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 8:18 Take heed therefore how ye hear: for whosoever hath, to him shall be given; and whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken even that which he seemeth to have.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Watch, then, in fact how you all hear. Since who might possibly have, it shall be given to him. And who might not think he has also that he expects to have, it shall be lifted away from him. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse speaks about what we have and about what we think we don't have. The fact that it is about what we think we lack is hidden in translation by the use of the two different Greek negatives, which are almost always ignored in English translation but which are very important in the original. 

The verb translated as "take heed" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" or, commonly, "watch" in English.

The Greek word translated as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative.

The Greek word translated as "how" means "how", "in any way", and "I suppose."

"Ye hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

An untranslated word appears here. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could." Since the form of the verb already indicates a "might", adding "possibly" creates a similar emphasis. 

The word translated as "hath" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is.

The word translated as "to him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "whosoever" is the same as above, a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or that you "don't think" something might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. This negative applies to the "to have" verb so it means "don't think you have" or "don't want to have". 

The word translated as "hath" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is.

The Greek word translated as "even" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "that" is the same demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that") used above, but here it is in a form referring to a thing, not a person. 

The word translated as "he seemeth" doesn't mean think as much as it means "expect" or "imagine." Since the previous phrase indicates that he doesn't think he has, the meaning here seems to be the "expect" referring to what he hope to have in the future. 

"Shall be taken" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."Christ uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross.

The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary: 

Βλέπετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Take heed" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." 

οὖν (adv) "Therefore" is oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore." 

πῶς (adv/conj) "How" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

ἀκούετε: (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whosoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

ἂν (partic)  Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." 

ἔχῃ, (verb 3rd sg pres subj act) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." 

δοθήσεται (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be given" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." -- The verb translated as "given" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

αὐτῷ, (adj sg masc dat) "To him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord." 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whosoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἂν (partic)  Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. 

ἔχῃ, (verb 3rd sg pres subj act) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

καὶ (conj) "Even" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(pron sg neut nom/acc) "Whosoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δοκεῖ (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act ) "He seemeth" is dokeo, which means "expect", "suppose", "imagine", "have an opinion", "seem", "seem good," and "to be reputed." ἔχειν (verb pres inf act) "To have" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἀρθήσεται (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be taken" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." 

ἀπ᾽ (prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. 

αὐτοῦ.  (adj sg masc gen ) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

Related Verses: 

Dec 1 2017