Mar 6:11 And whosoever shall not receive you,

KJV Verse: 

Mar 6:11 And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear you, when you depart thence, shake off the dust under your feet for a testimony against them. Verily I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment, than for that city.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And as many will not welcome you or even hear you, march on, shaking off the residue under your feet as the evidence of it. I tell you truly that it shall be more bearable in Sodom and Gomorrah in days of trial than that city.

Hidden Meaning: 

Said in the right tone, it is meant to get a laugh out of the apostles and calm them in the face of rejection. The message to the apostles was:

"If people reject you and your message, leave it behind. The problem is them, not you. Shake it off! Don't take it personally. They are as crazy as a bunch of loons. And they, really, they will pay for it. God will put a real hurting on them. "

Christ was telling the apostles to leave it behind, yes, but also know that they blew it, not you.

Christ uses the word translated as "receive" here exclusively in verses referring to being welcomed by people.

The word "hear" means the physical sense of hearing sounds, not necessarily listening or understanding words.

The words translated as "depart" is not the word translated in the previous verse as "depart" but a different word that has more the sense of "marching out."

The phrase "against them" is from a word that is simply a reflexive pronoun. Christ uses the term translated as "testimony" more like our idea of legal evidence.

The word translated as "judgment" is "krisis" which means a trial or choice. In English, this comes across as a threat and a condemnation. In spending some time with the words in Greek, it feels more like comfort and sadness.

For those who are going to be rejected, it is comfort. It tells us to simply put the rejection behind us. We must march on. We shake off the residue of it, symbolically leaving the evidence behind us. We shouldn't expect to be welcomed or even physically heard. For those who reject us, it comes across as sadness. Everyone has a time of trial and these people will have less to fall back upon than those who die a quick death.

Christ uses the word translated as "receive" here exclusively in verses referring to being welcomed by people. The word "hear" means the physical sense of hearing sounds, not necessarily listening or understanding words. The words translated as "depart" is not the word translated in the previous verse as "depart" but a different word that has more the sense of "marching out." The phrase "against them" is from a word that is simply a reflexive pronoun. Christ uses the term translated as "testimony" more like our idea of legal evidence. The word translated as "judgment" is "krisis" which means a trial or choice. In English, this comes across as a threat and a condemnation. In spending some time with the words in Greek, it feels more like comfort and sadness. For those who are going to be rejected, it is comfort. It tells us to simply put the rejection behind us. We must march on. We shake off the residue of it, symbolically leaving the evidence behind us. We shouldn't expect to be welcomed or even physically heard. For those who reject us, it comes across as sadness. Everyone has a time of trial and these people will have less to fall back upon than those who die a quick death.

Vocabulary: 

Whosoever" is from hosos (hosos), which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as."

"Receive" is from dechomai, (dechomai) which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people. (It means "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.)

"Hear" is from akouô (akouo), which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

"Depart" is from ekporeuô (ekporeuomai), which means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out."

"Shake" is from ektinassô (ektinasso), which means "to shake out", "to expel", "to shake off," and "to search thoroughly."

"Dust" is from chnoos (choos), which means "powder", "fine down", "dust", "any light porous substance", "the foam on the edge of the sea," and "chaff."

"Testimony" is from marturion (marturion), which means "testimony" and "proof." "Against them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord." "

More tolerable" is anektoteros (the "more" version of anektos), which "bearable", "sufferable", "that which can be endured," or "tolerable." "Judgment" is from krisis (krisis), which means "separating", "distinguishing", "judgment", "choice", "election", "trial", "dispute", "event," and "issue."