Mar 9:39 Forbid him not: for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name...

KJV Verse: 

Mar 9:39 Forbid him not: for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name, that can lightly speak evil of me.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Don't stop him: because no one who produces power upon this name of mine also has the sudden ability to bad mouth me.

Hidden Meaning: 

 

In the alternative, I preserve the play on words in the original Greek. The point that Christ makes is that the use of certain powers also limits how that power can be used. This may be an important note in discussing the rules of the spiritual world.

This verse also suggests interesting ideas concerning the connection between words and power. Using Christ's name gives people power. This power comes from belief in the concept of spiritual power, which makes everything possible (Mar 9:25). However, no one can believe and not believe at the same time. So the power of faith demands consistency. As Christ says, we cannot quickly change the way we think.

"Forbid" is a Greek verb that means "to hinder" and "to prevent."

"No man" is from a compound word that means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

"Shall do" is a verb that means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

"Miracle" is from a noun that means "power", "might", "outward power", "influence", and so on. This is the noun form of the verb translated as "can" below. 

"My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the things itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

"Can" is the verb that means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

"Lightly is an adjective form it means "swift", "fleet", "quick", "hasty", "rapid", "sudden," and "short." As an adverb,  it means "swiftly", "hastily," and (rarely) "perhaps".

"Speak evil" is a word that means "revile" and "abuse." It is a compound of the word that means "bad" and "evil" and the word that means "idea", "computation", "reckoning," and "value." As a verb, it words like our "bad mouth". 

Vocabulary: 

Μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

κωλύετε,  (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Forbid" is from kolyo, which means "to hinder", "withhold," and "to prevent."

αὐτόν,  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

οὐδεὶς (adj sg masc nom) "No man" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." -- The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "That" is hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." -- The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

ποιήσει (verb 3rd sg aor subj) "Shall do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do." -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

δύναμιν (noun sg fem acc ) "Miracle" is dynamis (dunamis), which means "power", "might", "influence", "authority", "capacity", "elementary force", "force of a word," and "value of money." Elemental forces are forces such as heat and cold. -- "Mighty works" is a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry the sense of authority over others, either people or laws. The verb form of this word is translated as "can" in the NT.

 

ἐπὶ (prep) "In" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τῷ ὀνόματί (noun sg neut dat) "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. 

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which means "me", and "mine". --  

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

δυνήσεται (verb 3rd sg aor subj mid) "Can" is from the verb, dunamai (dynamai), which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

ταχὺ (adj sg neut nom/acc) "Lightly is from tachy. In the adjective form it means "swift", "fleet", "quick", "hasty", "rapid", "sudden," and "short." As an adverb (tachu, tachy), it means "swiftly", "hastily," and (rarely) "perhaps."

κακολογῆσαί (verb aor inf act) "Speak evil" is from kakologeo, which means "revile" and "abuse." It is a compound of the word that means "bad" and "evil" kakos and the word logos, which means "idea", "computation", "reckoning," and "value."

με: (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regularfirst-person pronoun in Greek.

Related Verses: