Mark 14:6 ...Let her alone; why trouble ye her?

KJV Verse: 

Mark 14:6 ...Let her alone; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Let her go. Why to her a beating do you supply?  Noble work is performed on me.

Explanation of Greek: 

This "trouble" here is more violent than criticism. In the Greek, it is at least a metaphorical beating. There is also a misspelling in the first word here.

The word translated as "let...alone" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.  The word is misspelled, missing an "i". However, in the form show it is the imperative perfect of another verb meaning "to fasten," but that form is exceedingly rare and restricted mostly to ancient words.

The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

The Greek word translated as "why" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." and in questions can mean "who", "what", and "why."

The "trouble ye" is from two Greek words, a verb and a noun, both of them uncommon for Christ. The verb means "to hand over", "to supply", and "to cause" and a lot of specific terms. The noun means "beating","work", and "suffering" plus a lot of specialized meanings. The meaning comes out as to "hand out a beating" or "supply suffering." The feeling is humorous.

The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

"She has wrought" is from another word that Christ uses humorously. It means "work", "do," or "make," but it is not the common word Christ uses frequently that has the same general meaning and is usually translated as "to do", but a more sophisticated word he uses less commonly. This is from the same form as the word translated as "work" later in the verse. The form is where the subject acts on himself or for himself, so "she works for herself." Or it could be passive, since the "good works" is in a form that can be either the subject or the object.

The word translated as "good" referring to the "fruit" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Christ uses it as the opposite of a word that means "worthless" so "valuable" works well. It is in a form that could be either a subject or an object.

The Greek word translated as "works" means "deeds", "actions," and "things" in the sense of "every thing." It is from the same root as the "wrought" above. It is usually translated as "works" or "deed" in the NT. The form is either an object or subject.

The word translated as "on" also means "in", "within", "with," or "among."

The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek. 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἅφετε {Ἅφίετε}( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act ) "Let alone" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." --

αὐτήν: (adj sg fem acc) "Her" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." --

τί "Why" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

αὐτῇ (adj sg fem dat) "Her" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

κόπους [uncommon](noun pl masc acc) "Trouble ye" (with parecho below) is from kopos, which means "striking", "beating", "toil and trouble", "work", "suffering", "pain of disease," and "fatigue."

παρέχετε; [uncommon] (verb 2nd pl imperf ind act) "Trouble ye" (with kopos above) is from parecho, which means "to hand over", "to furnish", "to supply", "to yield", "to produce", "to cause", "to present", "to offer", "to allow", "to grant", "to render," and "to promise."

καλὸν (adj sg neut acc/nom) "Good" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." -

ἔργον ( noun sg neut acc/nom) "Work" is ergon, which means "works", "tasks", "deeds", "actions", "thing," and "matter." -- The Greek word translated as "works" means "deeds", "actions," and "things" in the sense of "every thing."

ἠργάσατο (verb 3rd sg aor ind mp) "Traded" is from ergazomai, which means to "work at", "make", "do", "perform", "work [a material]", "earn by working," work at a trade or business", " traffic," and "trade."

ἐν (prep) "On" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

ἐμοί: (noun sg masc dat) "Me" is emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb. --

Related Verses: 

Mar 23 2019