Mat 11:5 The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk

KJV Verse: 

Mat 11:5 The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached to them.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Blind, open their eyes and lame walk around. Rough clean themselves. Not only do dull hear but also dying awaken themselves. Also beggars proclaim the good news to themselves.

 

Hidden Meaning: 

You can't see it in English, but the verb and noun forms in this verse are chosen so that they form a pattern of rhymes. All the nouns here are adjectives, not nouns. They all have the same word ending and form, which makes them rhyme. The verbs have two forms, one active and the other where the subject acts on themselves. Again, the verbs were all chosen to that their forms rhyme. Though this verse looks like Mat 10:8 (Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers...) in English, they look very different in Greek because of this is so highly structured. This verse also encapsulates a number of double meanings. It demonstrates how carefully the Greek was chosen, which is unlikely to be an artifact of translation as opposed to the creativity of the speaker. Also, the verbs do not indicate the Jesus did these things, but that the people healed themselves. 

"The blind" is a word that means both physically and mentally blind. It also means all things that are obscure. It has no article "the" before it.

"Receive their sight" is a Greek verb that means "to look up", "recover sight", "open one's eye's" and, metaphorically, "revive."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

"The lame" is a word that means both "limping" and 'defective." It has no article "the" before it.

"Walk" is a word that means both "to walk up and down", "to walk around while teaching," and metaphorically, "to live."

"Leper" is lepros, which "scaly," scabrous," and "rough" and was used to describe the leprous" which was anyone with any skin condition. It has no article "the" before it.

"Are cleansed" is a word that means "to make clean", "to prune away," and "to purify." Its form is not passive, but in a form which indicates the subject acting on itself in the present tense.

"The deaf" is a word that primarily means "the dull" and is a metaphor for the "deaf." It has no article "the" before it.

"Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the primary meaning of hearing people talk about something.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, as it is later in this verse, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The word translated as "the dead" means "a corpse", "a dying man," and refers to inanimate matter. Christ also uses it as a metaphor for those who are dead spiritually.

The word for "are raised up" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. Like "cleansed" above, it is not a pure passive, but in a form which indicates the subject acting on itself in the present tense.

"The poor" is a word that means "a beggar" and "beggarly" and it a metaphor for being lacking in something.

"Have the gospel preached to them" is translated from a Greek word that means to"bring good news," and, in the passive, "receive good news." Like the previous verb, it is not a passive, but in a form which indicates the subject acting on itself in the present tense.

Wordplay: 

 Every noun and verb in this verse as a double meaning. The alternative above shows the major ones. A great example of the depth of meaning in the Greek not captured in English translation. 

The rhyming pattern is -οὶ -ουσιν, -οὶ -ουσιν, -οὶ ​-ζονται, -οὶ -ουσιν, -οὶ ​-ζονται, -οὶ ​-ζονται

Vocabulary: 

τυφλοὶ (adj pl masc nom) Blind" is from typhlos, which means "blind", "lacking vision of the future," [of things]"dim", "obscure", "dark," [of passages] "blind", "enclosed", "with no outlet," and is a metaphor for lacking sense."

ἀναβλέπουσιν” (3rd pl pres ind act) "Receive their sight" is anablepô, which means "to look up", "recover sight", "open one's eye's" and, metaphorically, "revive."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

χωλοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "The lame" is from chôlos, which means "lame", "limping," and "defective." A very similar word, cholos, which means "gall", "bitter", "angry," and "wrathful."

περιπατοῦσιν, (3rd pl pres ind act) "Walk" is from peripateo, which means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching."

λεπροὶ "Lepers" is from lepros, which "scaly," scabrous," and "rough" and is used to describe the leprous.

καθαρίζονται (3rd pl pres ind mp) "Are cleansed" is from katharizo, which means "to clean", "to clear the ground of weeds", "prune away", "to remove dirt", "to purify,"and "to remove impurities." It is also used to describe the removal of the inedible parts from grain (winnowing), clearing weeds from a field, pruning a plant and so on.

καὶ (conj)"And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

κωφοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "The deaf" is from kophos, which means "the blunt", "the dull," and "the obtuse" and is a metaphor for the "deaf."

ἀκούουσιν, (3rd pl pres ind act) "Hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

καὶ And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

νεκροὶ (adj pl masc nom) "The dead" is from nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the netherworld", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic"

ἐγείρονται (3rd pl pres ind mp) "Arise" is from egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse."

καὶ And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πτωχοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "The poor" is from ptochos, which means "beggar", "beggar-woman," and "beggarly."

εὐαγγελίζονται:” (3rd pl pres ind mp) "Have the gospel preached to them" is from euaggelizo. which means "bring good news", "announce good things", "preach or proclaim as glad tidings," and, in the passive, "receive good news."

Related Verses: 

Jun 19 2017