Matthew 9:28 Believe ye that I am able to do this?

Spoken to: 

group

Context: 

Two blind men ask for help and following him into a house.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Do you trust that I have the power to accomplish this?

KJV : 

Matthew 9:28 Believe ye that I am able to do this?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "I am able" actually means to have power or authority. It is from the verb form of the word having power.

NIV : 

Matthew 9:28 Do you believe that I am able to do this?”

My Takeaway: 

Jesus can do whatever we trust that he has the power to do.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πιστεύετε (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Believe" is pisteuo, which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

δύναμαι (verb 1st sg pres ind mp) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough." -

τοῦτο (adj sg neut acc) "This" is touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

ποιῆσαι; (verb aor inf act) "Do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to perform", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

KJV Analysis: 

Believe  -- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

am -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

able - The word translated as "able" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

do -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

this -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."?

KJV Translation Issues: 

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KJV Analysis identifies the location of translation issues with their abbreviations in bold face.

NIV Analysis: 

Do -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

Believe  -b- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact.

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

am -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

able - The word translated as "able" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

do -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

this -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."?

Believe  -- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

am -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

able - The word translated as "able" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

do -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

this -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."?

NIV Translation Issues: 

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The Spoken Version: 

Many people followed the Master from the magistrate’s house. Among them were two blind men, let through the crowd by one of their wives.  They followed him all the way back to Rock’s house.  His student turned away the reset of the crowd, telling them that the Teacher wouldn’t be speaking the rest of the day, but as the Master went in, the blind me called to him.
“Have pity on us, son of David!” they called after him.
The Master saw them and sent Rock to fetch them into the house as well.  They came in praising the Master and asking him to cure their blindness.
“Do you trust that I have the power to accomplish this?” the Master asked, while studying them carefully.
They agreed that they did.

Front Page Date: 

Aug 16 2020