John 15:19 If you were of the world,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

If you were from the world order, the powers-that-be would romantize [you] as their own. However, you are not from the powers-that-be because I have separated you out from the world order. This is why the world order hates you>

KJV : 

Jhn 15:19 If you were of the world, the world would love his own: but because you are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hates you.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

First, notice what Greek word Christ uses for "love" here. It is not the agape love that he is preaching for his followers. It is the phileo love, the most passionate, romantic love that comes closer to our English language concept. I have described this passionate love as more temporary, that is, of the world, while agape is more eternal, that is, more heavenly.

However, what I think about when I read this verse is not a Greek concept but an important Hebrew one. The word for "holy" or "consecrated" in Hebrew (qadash) means "to be separate." Its opposite was not the unholy, but the "common". Being "holy" was a separate state from the normal or natural state of the world. What made the Jewish people holy was their separation from other people.

Here, Christ is expressing this idea specifically to being either a part of the current world order or being separated from it.

I am reminded of the 60's saying that we are either part of the problem or part of the solution. The central issue is a question with the definition of what is the problem and solution. People "of the world order" define the problem as their inability to control other people. This is what creates and sustains that order. The solution is always more of their personal control, whether they are in or out of power. The "revolutionary" desire is to replace the current leaders of the world order with themselves and their more enlightened ideas of "the common good."

Those of the world order as always trying to get people to love them and their ideas so that those people will give them more power.

Christ view is different. It is a separation from the world order. It is a refusal to give the powers-that-be and their opponents who seek to be the powers-that-be power over us. Instead, we join the universal kingdom, the personal rule of God in our lives. We give to the world order what it demands but only so that we can avoid its battles and live for what really matters.

To be called to Christ is to be called out of the world, out of its politics and out of its enmity.

Wordplay: 

 Christ uses the Greek word, ek, to create two opposing ideas.  People can be "from" (ek) that world order, meaning that they are part of it, but they can also be singled out "from" (ek) the world order to be separated from it. So ek here means both to be joined and to be separate. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἰ "If" is from ei, which is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether."

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means "out of", "from", "by," and "away from."

κόσμου "World" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Matthew uses it when Christ is talking about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, as it is designed to be.

ἦτε (2nd pl pres subj act) "Were" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

κόσμος "World" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Christ uses it to talk about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, e.i. society.

ἂν "Would" is from an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἴδιον "His own" is from idios (idios), which means "one's own", "pertaining to one's self", "private", "personal", "personally attached", "separate distinct", "strange", "unusual", "peculiar," and "appropriate."

ἐφίλει (3rd sg imperf ind act) "Love" is from phileo, which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of." Compared to agape, the more common verb Christ uses that is translated as "love," phileo is stronger and more passionate, more like our use of love in English.

δὲ "But" is from de (de), which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences and an adversarial way.

ὅτι "Because" is from hoti (hoti), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that" and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what," and "wherefore." A form of hostis.

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means "out of", "from", "by," and "away from."

κόσμου "World" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Christ uses it to talk about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, e.i. society.

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, class="greek">μήapplies to will and thought; class="greek">οὐ denies, class="greek">μή rejects; class="greek">οὐ is absolute, class="greek">μή relative;class="greek">οὐ objective, class="greek">μή subjective.

ἐστέ (2nd pl pres ind act) "Are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἀλλ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

ἐξελεξάμην (1st sg aor ind) "I have chosen" is from eklegomai, which means "to pick out" "to single out," and "to choose for oneself."

ὑμᾶς "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means "out of", "from", "by," and "away from."

κόσμου "World" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Christ uses it to talk about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, e.i. society.

"Therefore" is from dia (dia) which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by", "among," and "between."

"Therefore" is from toutô (touto), which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]", "that [thing]" and as an adverb "this is why" and "therefore."

μισεῖ (3rd sg imperf ind act "Hate" is both from miseô (miseo), which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated."

ὑμᾶς "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

κόσμος "World" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Christ uses it to talk about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, e.i. society.