John 5:22 For the Father judgeth no man,

Spoken to: 

challengers

Context: 

Jesus is accused of breaking the Sabbath making himself a god by calling God his Father.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because not even does the Father separate nothing, instead, this separation, every one, he has given to the Son.

My Takeaway: 

Jesus can separate things because he is human, while the Divine sees the connection between all things.

KJV : 

John 5:22 For the Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son:

NIV : 

John 5:22 Moreover, the Father judges no one, but has entrusted all judgment to the Son,

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The two keywords here, translated as "judge" and "judgment" mean primarily "to separate" and "separation." The act of judging was the act of distinguishing, separating one type of thing from another, such as separating the material from the spiritual. It is the choice to separate things in a certain way. This is relevant because the Jewish word for "holy" (kedosh) means "separate" and holiness (kedushah) means "separateness." This separateness is a separation of "holy" from the common, ordinary things of life and a separate level of reality, the spiritual plane invisible to the material world. The word translated as "judgment" is the root of our English word "crisis," a turning point separating the past from the future. "Judgment" to Jesus is a separate idea from "justice" or "righteousness," which is the correctness of the action taken on the basis of our ability to separate things.

The word translated as "committed" and "entrusted" here is the simple, common word "given." It is translated that way in most English Bible translations, but not the KJV and NIV.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

οὐδὲ [51 verses](partic) Untranslated is oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not," "neither," and "nor." As an adverb, it means "not at all" and "not even."

γὰρ [205 verses](partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

πατὴρ [191 verses](noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is pater, which means "father," "grandfather," "author," "parent," and "forefathers."

κρίνει [30 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Judgeth" is krino, which primarily means "to separate," "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out," "to choose," "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate," "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way.

οὐδένα [69 verses](adj sg neut/masc/fem nom /acc) "No man" is oudeis which means "no one," "not one," "nothing," "naught," "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἀλλὰ [154 verses](conj) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

τὴν [821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

κρίσιν [26 verses]((noun sg fem acc) "Judgment" is krisis, which means "separating," "distinguishing," "judgment," "choice," "election," "trial," "dispute," "event," and "issue."

πᾶσαν  [212 verses](adj sg fem acc) "All" is pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether."

δέδωκεν [147 verses](3rd sg perf ind act ) "Hath committed" is didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe."

τῷ 821 verses](article sg masc dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

υἱῷ [158 verses](noun sg masc dat) "The Son" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant.

KJV Analysis: 

For --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause."

missing "not even"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "not ever" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even." As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions.

the   -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

judgeth -- The term used here for "judge" is a much more complicated idea. Unlike most words, which Christ uses specifically, he uses this word in a variety of senses simply because no English word corresponds to it precisely. He can mean "judge," "criticize," "decide," "discriminate," and "separate," depending on the context. We try to keep as closely as possible to the primary meaning of "separate" except when it doesn't fit.

no man, -- The Greek word translated as "no man" also means "no one," "nothing," and other negative nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

but -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this." This is not the common word translated as "but" separating sentences.

hath - This helping verb "hath" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past.

committed -- (CW) The verb translated as "committing" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way," "on every side," and "altogether."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

judgment -- The Greek word translated as "judgment" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. Christ uses it in a variety of ways, though the KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. Only secondarily does it means "judgment" as in a court judgment.

unto  - This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant." The phrase "the son of man" is the common way Christ refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense may be "the child of the man."

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "not even" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" is not the common word usually translated as "but."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "committed" does not capture the general meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "judgment" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Moreover --(CW) The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause."

missing "not even"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "not ever" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even." As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions.

the   -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

judgeth -- The term used here for "judge" is a much more complicated idea. Unlike most words, which Christ uses specifically, he uses this word in a variety of senses simply because no English word corresponds to it precisely. He can mean "judge," "criticize," "decide," "discriminate," and "separate," depending on the context. We try to keep as closely as possible to the primary meaning of "separate" except when it doesn't fit.

no one, -- The Greek word translated as "no one" also means "no man," "nothing," and other negative nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

but -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this." This is not the common word translated as "but" separating sentences.

has - This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past.

entrusted -- (CW) The verb translated as "entrusted " means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way," "on every side," and "altogether."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

judgment -- The Greek word translated as "judgment" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. Christ uses it in a variety of ways, though the KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. Only secondarily does it means "judgment" as in a court judgment.

to  - This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant." The phrase "the son of man" is the common way Christ refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense may be "the child of the man."

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "moreover" does not capture the general meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "not even" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" is not the common word usually translated as "but."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "entrusted " does not capture the general meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "judgment" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 18 2022