John 5:24 ...He that heareth my word, and believeth

Spoken to: 

challengers

Context: 

Jesus is accused of breaking the Sabbath making himself a god by calling God his Father.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Honestly, honestly, I tell you that the one this message of mine hearing and trusting the one sending me has a living continued. And not into a trial he does not start. Instead, he has moved from this death [sentence] into that living.

My Takeaway: 

For those who can trust the one who sent Jesus, their living continues.

KJV : 

John 5:24 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.

NIV : 

John 5:24 “Very truly I tell you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be judged but has crossed over from death to life.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

First, note Jesus's emphasis on trusting "the one sending him." He is not asking people to trust him. His message is not his own. The context here is Jesus defending himself against claiming he is a god.

While the Bible translation wants to be a simple promise of "eternal life," Jesus tells us a little more about what happens in death. Actually, it tells us that there is no conscious moment of "death" at all. That those with faith have "continued existence", passing from this form of life to the next. Jesus is saying we simply "step" from this death to this new life. There is no "judgment" or "judgment day," that is, a trial in this transition. The word translated as "into condemnation" means simply "in a separating" or "into a judgment" in the sense of a trial.

The word translated as "life"  here is always and only translated as "life." However, another common word that is often translated as "soul" is also translated as "life." The word used here is the verb form of the noun meaning "to live" and "to be alive."  This word also means "living," "property," and "substance." It is physical life and the substance of life. When we talk about “making a living” in English, we are talking about the Greek sense of this word. The Greek phrase translated as "everlasting life" and "eternal life" uses the adjective that means "of a lifetime" or "for an era." See this article.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἀμὴν  [88 verses](exclaim) "Verily" is amen, which is the Hebrew, meaning "truly," "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut."

ἀμὴν [88 verses](exclaim) "Verily" is amen, which is the Hebrew, meaning "truly," "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut."

λέγω [264 verses](1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is lego, which means "to recount," "to tell over," "to say," "to speak," "to teach," "to mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself," "pick up," "gather," "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay," "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

ὑμῖν, [289 verses](pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ὅτι [332 verses](adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that," "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what," "because," "since," and "wherefore."

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

τὸν 821 verses](article sg masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

λόγον [80 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Word" is logos, which means "word," "computation," "relation," "explanation," "law," "rule of conduct," "continuous statement," "tradition," "discussion," "reckoning," "reputation" (when applied to people), and "value."

μου [239 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Me" is from mou (emou), which means "me," and "mine." As a genitive object means movement away from something or a position away from something else.

ἀκούων [95 verses](part sg pres act masc) "Heareth" is akouo, (ἀκούω) which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  -

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

πιστεύων [69 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Believeth" is pisteuo, which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person," "to believe in someone's words," "to comply," "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

τῷ [821 verses](article sg masc dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πέμψαντί [39 verses] (part sg aor act masc dat) "Sent" is pempo, which means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort."

με [49 verses](pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which is the objective first-person, objective, singular pronoun that means  "me."

ἔχει: [181 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "He hath" is echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to have due to one," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to bear," "to carry," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, "acquire," "get,"

ζωήν,[42 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is zoe, which means "living," "substance," "property," "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον. [23 verses](adj sg fem acc) "Everlasting" is aionios, which means "lasting for an age," "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

κρίσιν  [26 verses]((noun sg fem acc) "Condemnation" is krisis, which means "separating," "distinguishing," "judgment," "choice," "election," "trial," "dispute," "event," and "issue."

οὐκ [269 verses](partic) "Not" is ou ( οὒ ) which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔρχονται [198 verses](3rd pl pres ind mp) "Come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἀλλὰ [154 verses](conj) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

μεταβέβηκεν [3 verses](verb 3rd sg perf ind act OR verb perf inf act ) "Is passed" is metabaino, which means "to pass over," "pass from one state to another," "change," "make a transition," "to pass to another place or state," and "to carry over."

ἐκ [121 verses] (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from;" 6) cause, instrument, or means "by."

τοῦ [821 verses](article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

θανάτου [15 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Death" is thanatos, which means "death" "kinds of death," specifically, "violent death," "corpse," and "a death sentence."

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν [821 verses](article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ζωήν,[42 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is zoe, which means "living," "substance," "property," "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

KJV Analysis: 

Verily, -- The word translated as "verily" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

verily, -- The word translated as "verily" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

say -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."  When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."  It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

you, -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.

missing "that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what," "because," "since," and "wherefore."

He   -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

heareth -- (WF) "Heareth" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  It is the most common verb that Christ uses meaning "to hear." It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent." The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "hearing."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

word, -- (CW) "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning," but it has many, many specific meanings from "deliberation" to "narrative."  It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. However, when applied to people, it means "repute" or "reputation." More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" or "teaching" to describe it but it also means the communication of various types, so "message" often works better.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

believeth -- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact. The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "trusting."

on -- This word "on" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context. The case can indicate a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "about" (or "for" or "against") indicating interest, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect. -

him -- (CW) The word translated as "him" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

sent -- (WF) "Sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out." The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "sending."

me, -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

hath -- The word translated as "hath" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "have means to do,"  "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This verb isn't used to form past tenses as it is in English. 

everlasting -- "Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

life, -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean the "existence" of physical life, spirit plus body. To learn more read this article on life eternal, For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

shall -- (WT) This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. This is the wrong tense for this verb.  Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not  -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

into -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

condemnation; -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "condemnation" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. The KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. The verb form of this word was translated as "judge" in John 5:22. It will be translated as "judgment" in John 5:30. And as "damnation" in John 5:29.

but -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this."

is -- (WT) This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb. However, the verb is the past, perfect, an action completed in the past, so "has passed."

passed -- The verb translated as "passed" means "to pass over" or "to make a change." It literally means "step between." The word describes a transition from one state to another, but the literal meaning is more evocative.

from -- The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" or "from."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

death -- "Death" is the Greek word meaning "death" generally and the death penalty specifically.

unto  -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

life. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean the "existence" of physical life, spirit plus body. To learn more read this article on life eternal, For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

KJV Translation Issues: 

15
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not the common word usually translated as "he."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "heareth" is not an active verb but a participle, "hearing."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "word" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "word" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "him" is not the common word usually translated as "him."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "shall" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "condemnation" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The English verb  "is" is the present tense, but Greek is in the past perfect. "have."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "death" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Very  -- (WW) The word translated as "very" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." This is not the word meaning "very."

truly , --  The word translated as "truly" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

tell -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."  When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."  It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you, -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.

missing "that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what," "because," "since," and "wherefore."

whoever -- (CW) The word translated as "whoever " is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

hears -- (WF) "Hears" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  It is the most common verb that Christ uses meaning "to hear." It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent." The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "hearing."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

word, -- (CW) "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning," but it has many, many specific meanings from "deliberation" to "narrative."  It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. However, when applied to people, it means "repute" or "reputation." More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it but it also means the communication of various types, so "message" often works better.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

believes -- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact. The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "trusting."

him -- (CW) The word translated as "him" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who " in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

sent -- (WF) "Sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out." The form of the word is not an active verb but a participle, a verb in the form of an adjective, "sending."

me, -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

has -- The word translated as "has" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "have means to do,"  "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This verb isn't used to form past tenses as it is in English. 

eternal -- "Eternal" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

life, -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

will -- (WT) This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. This is the wrong tense for this verb.  Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not  -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

be -- (WW) The word translated as "be" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

judged ; -- (WF) The Greek word translated as "judged" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. The KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. The verb form of this word was translated as "judge" in John 5:22. It will be translated as "judgment" in John 5:30. And as "damnation" in John 5:29. It is not a verb but a noun.

but -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this."

has -- This helping verb indicates the past perfect tense of the verb.

crossed over -- The verb translated as "crossed over" means "to pass over" or "to make a change." It literally means "step between." The word describes a transition from one state to another, but the literal meaning is more evocative.

from -- The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" or "from."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

death -- "Death" is the Greek word meaning "death" generally and the death penalty specifically.

unto  -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

life. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

NIV Translation Issues: 

15
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "very" should be "truly."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "whoever" is not the common word usually translated as "whoever."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "heareth" is not an active verb but a participle, "hearing."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "word" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "word" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "him" is not the common word usually translated as "him."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" should be "come."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "judged" is not an active verb but a noun "judgment."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "death" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 20 2022