Luke 22:26 But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Your yourselves, however? Not in this way. Rather, the greater among you? let him become just like the new one and the one leading as the one helping.

KJV : 

Luke 22:26 But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse has only one active verb, the rest are added in the KJV. This statement is another good example the difference between a spoken phrase, which isn't necessarily grammatically complete and a written sentence. There are two different conjunctions translated as the same word. There is one unique word for Jesus in it.

The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

There is no verb "shall...be" in the sentence.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The word translated in KJV as "so" is in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is not the same word that is the "but" at the beginning. There a It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

There is no "he that" in the Greek.

"The greatest" is an adjective which is the comparative form of the word meaning "big" or "great." It means "bigger", "higher", "longer", "greater" and simply, "superior." When it is introduced by an article, it means "the greater." It is not the superlative form, "the greatest" but the comparative, "the greater".

The word translated as "among" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

The word translated as "let him be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "to be," which is existence in the current state. The form is a third-person command, which is indicated by the "let him". The voice is a middle passive, someone being acted upon by himself, but our word "becomes" has that sense without adding anything to it.

The word translated as "as" is a word that as an adverb/conjunction means "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." However, the form could also be a pronoun, "this one" or "that one" as an object.

"The younger" is the comparative form of the adjective that means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh". It is introduced by an article so it acts like a noun, "the young one" or "the new one".

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "he that " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. Here, it comes before an adjective form of a verb.

There is no "is"  in the Greek.

"Chief" is the unique word here, one that Jesus only uses once in the Gospels. It is a verb that means to " go before, lead the way, be a leader, "lead", "command", "rule", "have dominion", "believe", and "hold." It is in the form of an adjective, "leading".

The word translated as "as" is a word that as an adverb/conjunction means "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." However, the form could also be a pronoun, "this one" or "that one" as an object.

The word translated as "he that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek verb translated as "doth serve" means "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." It is usually translated as "minister". It is from the same root as the Greek word usually translated as "minister".  However, in English, the word  might be better translated as "helper" though this word does include ideas such as "serving" a meal. It is not an active verb, but a verb in the form of an adjective, "serving", so with the article, "the one serving". However, this word doesn't refer to the idea of serving a meal.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "Ye" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you." --

δὲ (conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

οὐχ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

οὕτως, (adv) "So" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why." -- "This" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." --

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

μείζων (adj sg masc nom comp) "The greatest" is meizon which means "bigger", "higher", "longer," and "greater" and is the comparative form of megas, which means "big" and "great." The superlative form "greatest" is megistos, μέγιστος.--

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. --

γινέσθω ( verb 3rd sg pres imperat mp ) "Let...be" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", of things "to be produced," of events "take place", "come to pass", "to be engaged in", math "to be multiplied into", "become one of", "turn into".and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. --

ὡς ( pron pl masc acc / adv/ conj) "As" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. As an adverb, it means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." --

νεώτερος, ( adj sg masc nom ) "New" is neos, which means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". and as an adverb of time, "lately", "just now", "anew," and "afresh," -- 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

( article sg masc nom ) "He that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἡγούμενος [unique]( part sg pres mid masc nom ) "Chief" is hēgeomai, which is a verb that means to " go before, lead the way, be a leader, "lead", "command", "rule", "have dominion", "believe", and "hold."

ὡς ( pron pl masc acc / adv/ conj) "As" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. As an adverb, it means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

( article sg masc nom ) "He that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

διακονῶν: ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Doth serve" is from diakoneo, which "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." --

Front Page Date: 

Feb 7 2019