Luke 24:44 ...These are the words which I spake unto you,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

These? The explanations of mine the ones that I repeated before you, still being together with you. Because it needed to be competed. All these having been written in the tradition of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms about me.

KJV : 

Luke 24:44 ...These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse seems to be another example of a series of spoken responses, possibly to questions, that are put into a single sentence. It contains an entertaining word translated as "spoke" which is not the two most common words that mean "to say" or "to speak."

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὗτοι ( adj pl masc nom ) "These" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this," "that," "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way," "therefore," "so much," "to such an extent," and "that is why." --

οἱ λόγοι (noun pl masc nom )) "The word" is logos, which means "word," "computation," "relation," "explanation," "law," "rule of conduct," "continuous statement," "tradition," "discussion," "reckoning," and "value." --

μου (pro sg masc gen) Untranslated is mou, which mean "my," or "mine." -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. 

οὓς ( pron pl masc acc ) "Which" is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

ἐλάλησα ( verb 1st sg aor ind act ) "I spake" is laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle," "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. --

πρὸς (prep) "Unto" is pros, which means "on the side of," "in the direction of," "from (place)," "towards" "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "in the name of," "by reason of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before." --

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

ἔτι (adv) "Yet" is eti, which means "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree). -- 

ὢν ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "I was" is eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen,"  and "is possible." --

σὺν   [uncommon](prep) "With" is from syn, which means "along with," "in company with," "together with," "together," of things "attached to," as an instrument "by means of," --

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that," "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what," "because," "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

δεῖ ( verb 3rd sg imperf ind act ) "Must" is from, dei, which means "needful," and "there is need." -- 

πληρωθῆναι ( verb aor inf pass ) "Be fulfilled" is plêroô (pleroo), which mean "to fill," "to fulfill," "to make complete," "to pay in full," "to make pregnant," and "to fill full." --

πάντα ( adj pl neut acc) "All things" is pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether." --

τὰ ( article pl neut acc) "Which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

γεγραμμένα ( part pl perf mp neut acc ) "Were written" is grapho which means "to mark," "to express by written characters," "to write a letter," "to write down [a law]," "to proscribe," "to ordain," "to write for oneself," "to enroll oneself," "to draw signs," "to describe a figure" "to brand," and "to indict." -- 

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," and "with." --

τῷ νόμῳ ( noun sg masc dat ) "The law" is nomos, which means "anything assigned," "a usage," "custom," "law," "ordinance," or "that which is a habitual practice." It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal." --

Μωυσέως (Hebrew Name) "Moses" is Moyses, which means "Moses."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." --

τοῖς προφήταις ( noun pl masc dat ) "The prophets" is prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will," "interpreter," "keepers of the oracle," "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt," "interpreter," and "herald." It is a verb that means "to shine forth" It is a form of the verb, prophao. which means "to shine forth," or "to shine before." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

Ψαλμῶν [2 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Psalms" is  psalmos, which means "twitching" of finger on musical instrument, and "the sound of the cithara or harp."

περὶ (prep) "Concerning" is peri, which means "round about (Place)," "around," "about," "concerning," "on account of," "in regard to," "before," "above," "beyond," and "all around." --

ἐμοῦ. (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is emou, which means "me," and "mine." --  

KJV Analysis: 

"These" is translated from a Greek word that means "this," "that," "the nearer." -- The word translated in KJV as "thus" is in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

There is no verb "are" here.

"the words" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" or "explanation" to describe it. 

There is an untranslated Greek word here that means "of mine."

The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Christ uses it to capture the idea of "pass on," because that captures both someone gossiping and an oracle does. The word is somewhat self-effacing.

The word translated as "unto" means "towards,"  "before," "by reason of (for)," and "against." Usually, the phrase "unto you" is just the indirect object form of "you" since the preposition is not needed.

The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

There is no "while" in the Greek. It is added because the form of the verb is changed from an adjective to an active verb.

The verb "I was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  It is in the form of an adjective, "being."

Yet" is an adverb that means "yet" and "still," "already,"  "longer," "no longer" (with a negative), "still" and "besides." 

The word translated as "with" is also not from the word Christ uses to say "with." It is from a preposition that Christ rarely uses that means "together with" and, when referring to things "attached to" and "by means of." He uses this word because he is "with" them now in one sense, but not longer part of their company.

The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause. Jesus seems to use it like our word "because" to begin the answer of a question.

The word translated as "all things" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." The "things" comes from its plural, neuter form. This is not the subject of the verb, but its object.

The Greek verb translated as "must" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular. It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed. Since it is singular, the subject cannot be "all things."

"Be fulfilled" is a verb that means "to fill," "to fulfill," and "to fill full."

The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. Here, it preceded an adjective, making it work like a noun.

"Were written" is the Greek verb that  means "to mark," "to express by written characters," "to write a letter," "to write down [a law]," and so on. The form is an adjective describing something completed in the past, "having been writen." Introduced by an article, it acts like a noun, "these having been written."

The word translated as "in" also means "within," "with," or "among."

The Greek word translated as "the law" describes the social norms, which can be from "tradition," "common practice," or the "laws." Christ also uses it to refer to the first five books of the OT written by Moses.

"Moses" iis the Greek spelling of the word we translated as "Moses."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

There is no "in" here, but it is assumed from the previous "in."

The Greek word translated as "the prophets" means "one who speaks for God," "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople, but their books in the OT. It is the verb that means "to shine before." Our word "luminaries" captures the idea very well. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

There is no "in" here, but it is assumed from the previous "in."

"Psalms" is a Greek word that means "twitching" of finger on musical instrument, and "the sound of the cithara or harp." We would say "pluckings." We use the Greek word, psalmos, instead of translating it.

The Greek word translated as "concerning" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about," "concerning," "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me."

Front Page Date: 

Mar 16 2019