Mark 10:18 Why do you call me good?...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Why boast of me good? No one good if not speaking the Divine 

KJV : 

Mark 10:18  Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are two words commonly translated as "good' in the Gospels. The one used here has the sense of "useful."  (see this article about those words). Strangely, neither of these "good" words are used to describe God except in this verse and the one in Luke 18:19 that has the same vocabulary. This verse, as translated in the KJV, requires a lot of additional words that are not in the Gree. This is because noun and adjectives of the same form in sex, number, and case are equated in Greek without the use of additional words. Here, the first "good" and "me" are the same form. Then the "none" and second "good" are also the same form. That form matches the "one" and "God." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τί  (irreg sg neut nom) "Why" is from tis which in a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

με (pron 1st sg masc acc ) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". --

λέγεις (verb 2nd sg pres ind act) "Callest thou" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." 

ἀγαθόν; (adj sg masc acc) "Good" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial."

οὐδεὶς (adj sg masc nom) "No man" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." 

ἀγαθὸς (adj sg masc nom) "Good" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial."

εἰ μὴ (conj particle)"Except" is ei me, which is the conjunction that means "if not", "but," and "except." εἰ is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether." mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." 

εἷς (noun sg masc nom) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person. OR ( part sg aor act masc nom) "One" is hiemi a verb meaning to "release," "speak," "throw," "shoot," "send," "go," and [of water] "flow" or "spout," 

[ὁ]  (article sg masc nom) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

θεός. (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

KJV Analysis: 

Why -- The word translated as "why" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

callest The word translated as "callest" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to boast of," which fits its use here. The form is second-person singular.

thou -- The "thou" is from the sccond person, singular form of the verb.

me -- The "me" is the object of the verb.

good? --  The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." 

there -- This word is not in the Greek.

is -- This word is not in the Greek.

none -- The Greek word translated as "none" also means "nothing" and other negatives nouns. 

good --  The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." 

but -- Nether of the two Greek words commonly translated as "but" appear here. Instead, this is a phrase of two Greek words that mean "if not" but this phrase is used to mean "except", "instead", and "but." 

one,  The "one" is the number, which can also be used like a pronoun. However, the same word is an adjective form of

that-- This word is not in the Greek.

is, -- This word is not in the Greek.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God. --  The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods. The only difference between this version and Luke's is that Luke lacks the article. 

Front Page Date: 

Oct 8 2019