Mark 14:36 ...Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Abba, the Father. Everything possible to you. He serves the cup, this one from me. Still not something I myself want but what you.

KJV : 

Mark 14:36 ...Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup from me: nevertheless not what I will, but what thou wilt.

NIV : 

Mark 14:36 Abba, Father, everything is possible for you. Take this cup from me. Yet not what I will, but what you will.

3rd Translation: 

Mark 14:36 Abba, Father, everything is possible for you. Please take this cup of suffering away from me. Yet I want your will to be done, not mine.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the Greeks, this prayer sound like fragments of speech overheard by someone. It is much more emotional in the Greek. Verbs are missing. The Father is addressed both directly and talked about in the third-person.

Jesus makes no request of his Father. There is no word meaning "take away." The verb means "serve" and it is not a request or a command. It is a statement in the third person, "he serves" or "it serves." The "from me" seems to describe source of the cup since the verb means "bringing" not "taking away." This could be a reference to the cup of Jesus's blood from Mark 14:24.

This is also another example of a bilingual statement that could not have been translated from Aramaic, since it contains an untranslated Aramaic word, Abba. This is one of the many examples of a verse the proves Jesus spoke Greek.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἀββά [unique](Hebrew word) "Abba" is abba, the Hebrew word for "father."

(article sg masc nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατήρ, (noun sg masc nom) "Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." While most noun have the same vocative form as the subject, the vocative for the word "father" is its root, πατερ.

πάντα ( adj pl neut acc/nom ) "All things" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." --

δυνατά  (adj pl neut acc/nom) "Possible" is from dynatos, which means "strong", "mighty," (of things) "possible," "powerful," "influential", "able to produce", "productive," (of things) "possible," and "practicable." --

σοι: (pron 2nd sg dat) "Unto Thee" is soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you".

παρένεγκε [2 verses]( verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Take away" is parapherō, which means "serves," "set before," "bring to", "bring forward", "carry past", "hand over", "turn aside", "turn towards",  "mislead", "change/later" (a decree), "sweep away" (a river), "let pass", or "differ" (in dialects). Literally, "bring by" or "bring aside".

τὸ   (article sg neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ποτήριον (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Cup" is from poterion, which means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple.

τοῦτο ( adj sg neut nom/acc ) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar." --

ἀπ᾽ (prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. With the genitive pronoun below, this indicates the person "by whom" something is done.

ἐμοῦ: (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". --

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

τί ( pron sg neut acc/nom) "What" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. --

θέλω  ( verb 1st sg pres ind/subj act ) "I will" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain", "to hold", "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly".

ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

τί  ( pron sg neut acc/nom) "What" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." -- The Greek word translated as "some" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those."  -- The word translated as "a certain" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but can be used to mean someone of note as we would say "a someone". -- The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

σύ. (pron 2nd sg nom) "Thou" is from su which means "you" and "your."

KJV Analysis: 

Abba, -- "Abba" is uniquely used by Jesus here. It not a childish form of the word, but the Aramaic word used at the time to refer to "father," specifically one's own father. according to academics. The Hebrew term used in the OT is "ab," which was only used eight or nine  times to refer to God as the Father, such as in Isaiah 63:16,  Psalm 89:26. Isaiah uses the term most frequently, four times.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- (WF) "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers".  The form is NOT one of personal address (vocative), which Jesus uses often. The form here is the subject with a preceding "the" so "the Father" or "this Father.

all -- The word translated as "all " is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything."

things -- This comes from the the plural, neutral form of the previous adjective.

are -- There is no verb "are" here in the Greek. However, when noun, pronouns or adjectives, appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" can be assumed. The same is true of the "father" above, which is also a subject without a verb.

possible -- "Possible" is from an adjective that means "strong", "mighty," and "practicable." Of things, it means "possible." It is the noun form of the verb means "having power." The form of the word is again a subject matching the form of the "all things" above.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

thee; The word for "thee" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

take -- (WW, WF) "Take" is a word Jesus only uses here and in the parallel verse in Matthew. It means "serve," "set before," and it is used especially for serving meat at a table.  Literally, the word literally means  "bring by" or "bring to the side". It is not a command or a request, as translated, but an active verb, "he serves" or "it sets before."

away -- This is from the preposition "from" below.

this  "This" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar." The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.  This word appears after "the cup" as a reiteration.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

cup The word for "cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Jesus as a symbol for sharing burdens. See this article for more. It has an article, so "the cup". The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.

from -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

nevertheless -- The Greek word translated as "nevertheless" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions, desires, or thoughts. It makes a negative statement of fact. This  does not negate the whole clause because it doesn't appear before the verb, but just the next word.

what -- The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

I -- The actual pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

will, --- The Greek word translated as "will" expresses consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose." The verb form is used in Matthew, but the noun is used in Luke.

but The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

what The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

thou -- The "thou" is the second-person pronoun in the form of a subject.

wilt. -- There is no verb in the Greek, but a verb can be assumed from the form of the "thou." Since both a subject ("thou") and an object ("what") appear without a verb, the previous verb can be assumed.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "Father" is not in a form of a name being addressed to someone, but that of a subject.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "take" means "serve."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command or even in the second-person.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation. 

NIV Analysis: 

Abba, -- "Abba" is uniquely used by Jesus here. It not a childish form of the word, but the Aramaic word used at the time to refer to "father," specifically one's own father. according to academics. The Hebrew term used in the OT is "ab," which was only used eight or nine  times to refer to God as the Father, such as in Isaiah 63:16,  Psalm 89:26. Isaiah uses the term most frequently, four times.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- (WF) "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers".  The form is NOT one of personal address (vocative), which Jesus uses often. The form here is the subject with a preceding "the" so "the Father" or "this Father.

everything -- The word translated as "all " is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything."

is -- There is no verb "is" here in the Greek. However, when nouns, pronouns or adjectives appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" can be assumed. The same is true of the "father" above, which is also a subject without a verb.

possible -- "Possible" is from an adjective that means "strong", "mighty," and "practicable." Of things, it means "possible." It is the noun form of the verb means "having power." The form of the word is again a subject matching the form of the "all things" above.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

you; The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

take -- (WW, WF) "Take" is a word Jesus only uses here and in the parallel verse in Matthew. It means "serve," "set before," and it is used especially for serving meat at a table.  Literally, the word literally means  "bring by" or "bring to the side". It is not a command or a request, as translated, but an active verb, "he serves" or "it sets before."

this  -- "This" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar." The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.  This word appears after "the cup" as a reiteration.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

cup The word for "cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Jesus as a symbol for sharing burdens. See this article for more. It has an article, so "the cup". The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.

from -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

Yet -- The Greek word translated as "yet" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It also means "still," "however," etc.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions, desires, or thoughts. It makes a negative statement of fact. This  does not negate the whole clause because it doesn't appear before the verb, but just the next word.

what -- The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

I -- The actual pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

will, --- The Greek word translated as "will" expresses consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose." The verb form is used in Matthew, but the noun is used in Luke.

but The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

what The word translated as "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

you -- The "you" is the second-person pronoun in the form of a subject.

will. -- There is no verb in the Greek, but a verb can be assumed from the form of the "thou." Since both a subject ("thou") and an object ("what") appear without a verb, the previous verb can be assumed.

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "Father" is not in a form of a name being addressed to someone, but that of a subject.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "take" means "serve."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command or even in the second-person.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation. 

3rd Analysis: 

Abba, -- "Abba" is uniquely used by Jesus here. It not a childish form of the word, but the Aramaic word used at the time to refer to "father," specifically one's own father. according to academics. The Hebrew term used in the OT is "ab," which was only used eight or nine  times to refer to God as the Father, such as in Isaiah 63:16,  Psalm 89:26. Isaiah uses the term most frequently, four times.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- (WF) "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers".  The form is NOT one of personal address (vocative), which Jesus uses often. The form here is the subject with a preceding "the" so "the Father" or "this Father.

everything -- The word translated as "all " is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything."

is -- There is no verb "is" here in the Greek. However, when nouns, pronouns or adjectives appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" can be assumed. The same is true of the "father" above, which is also a subject without a verb.

possible -- "Possible" is from an adjective that means "strong", "mighty," and "practicable." Of things, it means "possible." It is the noun form of the verb means "having power." The form of the word is again a subject matching the form of the "all things" above.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

you; The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

Please -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "please" in the Greek source.

take -- (WW, WF) "Take" is a word Jesus only uses here and in the parallel verse in Matthew. It means "serve," "set before," and it is used especially for serving meat at a table.  Literally, the word literally means  "bring by" or "bring to the side". It is not a command or a request, as translated, but an active verb, "he serves" or "it sets before."

this  -- "This" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar." The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.  This word appears after "the cup" as a reiteration.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

cup The word for "cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Jesus as a symbol for sharing burdens. See this article for more. It has an article, so "the cup". The form could be either the subject or the object of the verb.

of suffering -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "of suffering" in the Greek source.

away from -- The word translated as "away from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

Yet -- The Greek word translated as "yet" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It also means "still," "however," etc.

I -- The actual pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

want, --- The Greek word translated as "want" expresses consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose." The verb form is used in Matthew, but the noun is used in Luke.

your -- (WF) The "your" is the second-person pronoun in the form of a subject, "you," not "your."

will to be done -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "will to be done" in the Greek source.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions, desires, or thoughts. It makes a negative statement of fact. This  does not negate the whole clause because it doesn't appear before the verb, but just the next word.

untranslated "what"-- (MW) The untranslated word "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

untranslated "what"-- (MW) The untranslated word "what" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why".

3rd Issue Count: 

12
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "Father" is not in a form of a name being addressed to someone, but that of a subject.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "please" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "take" means "serve."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command or a request or even in the second-person.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation. 
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "of suffering" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "your" should be "you."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "will be done" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "what" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "what" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 29 2020