Mark 14:49 I was daily with you in the temple teaching,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

By day, I was before you in the temple explaining and, no, you didn't conquer me. Nevertheless, in order that those writings should be fulfilled...

KJV : 

Mark 14:49 I was daily with you in the temple teaching, and ye took me not: but the scriptures must be fulfilled.

NIV : 

Mark 14:49  Every day I was with you, teaching in the temple courts, and you did not arrest me. But the Scriptures must be fulfilled.” 

3rd Translation: 

Mark 14:49 Why didn’t you arrest me in the Temple? I was there among you teaching every day. But these things are happening to fulfill what the Scriptures say about me.”

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

A different Greek word is translated as "took" and "arrest" in this verse but another word was translated that way in the the previous verse ( Mark 14:48). Both are uncommon words for Jesus. but the previous word meant "get together" and this one means "to conquer." The word translated as "teaching" also means "explaining." The word translated as "with" here actually means "before" so the sense is that Jesus argued before them in the temple and they could not conquer him.

The last clause here is left hanging, a subordinate clause without a main clause. That is lost in translation because the conjunction making it a subordinate clause it edited out in the translations.  The effect in the Greek is one of light-hearted resignation.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καθ᾽ (adv/prep) Untranslated is kata, which, as a preposition, means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally." With "day" is mean "by day."

ἡμέραν ( noun sg fem acc ) "Daily" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." --

ἤμην (verb 1st sg imperf ind mid) "I was" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

πρὸς (prep) "For" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." --

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

τῷ (article sg masc dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἱερῷ (adj sg masc dat) "The temple" is from hieron, means which means "filled with or manifesting divine power", "holy," "consecrated", "under divine protection", "holy place", "sacred principle," and "supernatural." It also means "victim" or "sacrifice." It is related to the word used for "priest." Both come from the word hieros, which means "super-human", "mighty", "divine", "wonderful" and "holy."

διδάσκων ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Teaching" is didasko, which means "to teach", "to instruct", "to indicate", "to explain," and "to give sign of."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

οὐκ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐκρατήσατέ [8 verses]( verb 2nd pl aor ind act ) "You took" is krateo, which means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command."

με: ( pron 1st sg masc acc ) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". --

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

ἵνα (adv/conj) Untranslated is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise". This is not the most common Greek word translated as "but."

πληρωθῶσιν ( verb 3rd pl aor subj pass ) "Must be fulfilled" is plêroô (pleroo), which mean "to fill", "to fulfill", "to make complete", "to pay in full", "to make pregnant," and "to fill full." --

αἱ (article pl fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

γραφαί. ( noun pl fem nom ) "The scriptures" is graphe, which means "representing by means of lines", "a drawing", "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written."

KJV Analysis: 

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

was -- The verb "I was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

untranslated "by"-- (MW) The untranslated preposition means "down from", "down into", "against", "opposite", "separately", and so on. But with the word "day" it means "by day."

daily -- (WF) The Greek word translated as "daily" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."  However, with the untranslated preposition, it means simply, "by day."

with -- (WW) The preposition translated as "with" is not the common Greek preposition translated as "with." primarily. This preposition means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against," but here the sense is "in the presence" and "before".

you - The word translated as "you" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

temple -- "Temple" from a noun that means "holy place" and it related to the word used for "priest." However, it is also a noun that means "sacrifice" or "victim." It creates a play on words.

teaching, -- The word translated as "teaching" also means "explaining" but it from the same root as the word for "teacher" or "instructor."  This word is also used in the Matthew version.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

took -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "ye took" means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command." This is not the word translated as "took" in the previous verse.

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

not: -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise". This is not the most common Greek word translated as "but."

untranslated "in order that"-- (MW) The untranslated word  means "there", "where," and "in order that."

the . -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

scriptures "The scriptures" is a Greek noun that means  "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." It came to mean "scripture" from its use in the Gospels.

must -- (WW) The helping verb here should be either "should" or "might" because it comes from the subjunctive form of the verb.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

fulfilled. "Fulfilled" is a verb that means "to fill", "to fulfill," and "to fill full."  The form does not mean "must" but rather "might" or, in this case, "should."

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "by" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "daily" is not an adverb but a noun, "day."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "with" means "before."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "in order that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "must" should be "might" or "should."

NIV Analysis: 

Every -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "every " in the Greek source.

untranslated "by"-- (MW) The untranslated preposition means "down from", "down into", "against", "opposite", "separately", and so on. But with the word "day" it means "by day."

day -- The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."  However, with the untranslated preposition, it means simply, "by day."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

was -- The verb "I was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

with -- (WW) The preposition translated as "with" is not the common Greek preposition translated as "with." primarily. This preposition means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against," but here the sense is "in the presence" and "before".

you - The word translated as "you" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

teaching, -- The word translated as "teaching" also means "explaining" but it from the same root as the word for "teacher" or "instructor."  This word is also used in the Matthew version.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

temple -- "Temple" from a noun that means "holy place" and it related to the word used for "priest." However, it is also a noun that means "sacrifice" or "victim." It creates a play on words.

courts, -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "courts " in the Greek source.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

did -- This helping verb is added to make this a negative sentence.

not: -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

arrest -- The Greek word translated as "arrest" means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command." This is not the word translated as "arrest" in the previous verse.

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise". This is not the most common Greek word translated as "but."

untranslated "in order that"-- (MW) The untranslated word  means "there", "where," and "in order that."

the . -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

Scriptures "The scriptures" is a Greek noun that means  "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." It came to mean "scripture" from its use in the Gospels.

must -- (WW) The helping verb here should be either "should" or "might" because it comes from the subjunctive form of the verb.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

fulfilled. "Fulfilled" is a verb that means "to fill", "to fulfill," and "to fill full."  The form does not mean "must" but rather "might" or, in this case, "should."

NIV Translation Issues: 

6
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "every" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "by" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "with" means "before."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "courts" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "in order that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "must" should be "might" or "should."

3rd Analysis: 

Why -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "why" in the Greek source.

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

did-- This helping verb is added to make this a negative sentence.

n’t -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

arrest -- The Greek word translated as "arrest" means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command." This is not the word translated as "arrest" in the previous verse.

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

temple -- "Temple" from a noun that means "holy place" and it related to the word used for "priest." However, it is also a noun that means "sacrifice" or "victim." It creates a play on words.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

was -- The verb "I was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

there -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "there" in the Greek source.

among -- (WW) The preposition translated as "among" is not the common Greek preposition translated as "among" primarily. This preposition means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against," but here the sense is "in the presence" and "before".

you - The word translated as "you" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

teaching, -- The word translated as "teaching" also means "explaining" but it from the same root as the word for "teacher" or "instructor."  This word is also used in the Matthew version.

every -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "every " in the Greek source.

untranslated "by"-- (MW) The untranslated preposition means "down from", "down into", "against", "opposite", "separately", and so on. But with the word "day" it means "by day."

day -- The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."  However, with the untranslated preposition, it means simply, "by day."

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise". This is not the most common Greek word translated as "but."

untranslated "in order that"-- (MW) The untranslated word  means "there", "where," and "in order that."

 these things are happening -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "these things are happening" in the Greek source.

to -- (WW) This helping verb "to" indicates that the verb is an infinitive, but the verb is a passive, subjunctive verb so a "might be" is needed. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

fulfill -- (WF) "Fulfill" is a verb that means "to fill", "to fulfill," and "to fill full."  The form is a passive subjunctive, so "might be fulfilled.

what -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "what" in the Greek source.

the . -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

Scriptures "The scriptures" is a Greek noun that means  "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." It came to mean "scripture" from its use in the Gospels.

say about me.” -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "say about me." in the Greek source.

3rd Issue Count: 

12
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "why" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "there" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "among" means "before."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "every" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "by" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "in order that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "these things are happening" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "to" should be "might be."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "fulfill" is not an infinitive by an active verb, "fulfilled."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "what" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "say about me" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 5 2020