Matthew 13:12 For whoever has,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Parable, the Sower, explanation

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because whoever possesses, it will be given to him and it will be made greater. Whoever, however, doesn't have? Even what he has, it will be lifted away from him.

My Takeaway: 

The more we understand the nature of the word, the more abundant our lives become.

KJV : 

Matthew 13:12 For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.

NIV : 

Matthew 13:12 Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Though this is usually translated in a way that makes us think, "the rich get richer," Jesus is saying more than this.

First note that this verse begins with a "because." To use this indicates that Jesus could well be answering a question that was not recorded (the Unrecorded Dialogue Theory). Notice also that "it" that people have and the "it" they are given is not defined. This is because objects are assumed from the previous context. Though the context could have changed in the question asked, Matthew 13:11 established the context of knowledge of the secrets of the realm of the skies. In that context, this verse is more specific, those with more basic understanding can build on that understanding more easily than those that cannot. However, there is also the more general idea that more general knowledge leads to more abundance in the form of wealth, friends, and other valuable things.

Wordplay: 

This entire phrase can be interpreted as either positive or negative, depending on what a person as blessings or burdens.The word translated as "remove" also has positive meanings such as "lifted up" and "exalt." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅστις (pron sg masc nom) "Whosoever" is from hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

γὰρ  (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἔχει, (3rd sg pres ind act) "Hath" is from echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to bear," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

δοθήσεται (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be given" is from didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe."

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "To him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

περισσευθήσεται: [7 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "He shall have in more abundance" is a single word, perisseuo, which means "to be over and above," "to go beyond," "to abound in," "to be superior," and, in a negative sense, "to be superfluous." In the passive, "to be made to abound," and, of time, "to be made longer."

ὅστις (pron sg masc nom) "Whosoever" is from hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

οὐκ (part) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

χει, (3rd sg pres ind act)"Hath" is from echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to bear," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

(pron sg neut acc) "That" is from hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἔχει (3rd sg pres ind act)"Hath" is from echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to bear," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἀρθήσεται (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be taken away" is from airo, which means "to lift up," "to raise," "to raise up," "to exalt," "to lift and take away," and "to remove."

ἀπ᾽ (prep) "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

For  - The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

whosoever  - "Whoever" is from a pronoun that means "anyone who" or "anything which." It is most often translated as "which" in the NT.

hath,  - The word translated as "hath" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

him  - The word translated as "to him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

given, -  "Given" is from a verb which means "to give," "to grant," "to produce," "to devote oneself," and "to deliver." It is the world almost always translated as "give" in the Gospels. The form is different in the previous verse. Here, the subject is acted upon and doesn't act on itself.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

have  - (WF) "Have" is from the verb that means "to be over and above,""to be superior," and, in a negative sense, "to be superfluous." The problem is that the passive form has the sense of "being made to abound in," not just to have an abundance. It is in the future, passive, so "will be made to abound in," "will be made superior," "will be made superfluous."

more-- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "beyond."

abundance:  - This is from the noun form of the verb that means "abundance" or from the sense of "that beyond."

but  - The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

whosoever  - "Whoever" is from a pronoun that means "anyone who" or "anything which." It is most often translated as "which" in the NT.

hath,  - The word translated as "hath" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

not,  - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

from  - "From" is from the preposition of separation. It means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

him  - -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

taken away - (CW)  "Taken ways" is an interesting translation of a verb , which primarily means "to lift," and also means "to raise up," "to take up," "to raise a child," "to exalt," "to lift and take away," and "to remove." Jesus uses it both in the sense of "lift" and "remove" but this is usually translated as "take up" or "take" in the Gospels.

even  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." -

that -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

hath.   - The word translated as "hath" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "have more abundance" is not an active verb but passive one, "made more abundant."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "taken away" is usually translated as "lifted" but it also means "removed."

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "because"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is "because" or "for," which can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

Whoever - "Whoever" is from a pronoun that means "anyone who" or "anything which." It is most often translated as "which" in the NT.

has,  - The word translated as "has" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

untranslated "to him"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is "to him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

will  -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

given, -  "Given" is from a verb which means "to give," "to grant," "to produce," "to devote oneself," and "to deliver." It is the world almost always translated as "give" in the Gospels. The form is different in the previous verse. Here, the subject is acted upon and doesn't act on itself.

more -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "more" in the Greek source.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

they -- (WN) This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

have  - (WF) "Have" is from the verb that means "to be over and above,""to be superior," and, in a negative sense, "to be superfluous." The problem is that the passive form has the sense of "being made to abound in," not just to have an abundance. It is in the future, passive, so "will be made to abound in," "will be made superior," "will be made superfluous."

an  - - There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. This is from the verb.

abundance:  - This is from the noun form of the verb that means "abundance" or from the sense of "that beyond." This is from the verb.

untranslated "however"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

Whoever - "Whoever" is from a pronoun that means "anyone who" or "anything which." It is most often translated as "which" in the NT.

does -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

not,  - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

have,  - The word translated as "have" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

even  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." -

what -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

they --(WN)  This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

have .   - The word translated as "have" means "to possess," "to hold," or "to keep."

will -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

taken -  "Taken" is an interesting translation of a verb , which primarily means "to lift," and also means "to raise up," "to take up," "to raise a child," "to exalt," "to lift and take away," and "to remove." Jesus uses it both in the sense of "lift" and "remove" but this is usually translated as "take up" or "take" in the Gospels.

from  - "From" is from the preposition of separation. It means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

him  - -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "to him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "more" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "they" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "have more abundance" is not an active verb but passive one, "made more abundant."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "however" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "they" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.

Front Page Date: 

Dec 1 2020