Matthew 17:7 Arise, and be not afraid.

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

After the transfiguration and an announcement from a cloud, Peter, James, and John fall on their faces.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You should be stirred up! And don't frighten yourselves!

KJV : 

Matthew 17:7 Arise, and be not afraid.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first word, translated as "arise/wake up" is not a command. It is either a simple statement or something that might or should happen. It is also passive, "You should be stirred/woken up."

The second verb is a command, but it is either the passive or middle voice when the subject acts on themselves, "don't frigthen yourselves."
 

NIV : 

Matthew 17:7 Get up. Don’t be afraid

My Takeaway: 

We should be stirred up when we hear God but not frightened ourselves.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγέρθητε [40 verses](verb 2nd pl aor ind/subj pass) "Arise" is from egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

φοβεῖσθε[18 verses](verb 2nd pl pres imperat mp) "Be afraid" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something."

KJV Analysis: 

missing "You"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. The verb is not a command but a statement, perhaps of possibility.

missing "are" or "should be"  -- (WV) The untranslated word is passive voice, not active.

Arise, -- (WF) The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. It is not a command, but a passive statement.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive, but it could also be the middle voice where the subject acts on themselves. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not  - The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

afraid. -- (WF) "Afraid" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." However, it is a verb not an adjective.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" as a subject is not shown in the English translation.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice --- The verb is either passive or the middle voice so there is a missing "are" or "should be" here.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "arise" is not a command.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "afraid" is a verb not an adjective.

NIV Analysis: 

missing "You"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. The verb is not a command but a statement, perhaps of possibility.

missing "are" or "should be"  -- (WV) The untranslated word is passive voice, not active.

Get up, -- (WF) The word for "get up" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. It is not a command, but a passive statement.

missing "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

do- -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

-n't  - The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive, but it could also be the middle voice where the subject acts on themselves. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

afraid. -- (WF) "Afraid" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." However, it is a verb not an adjective.

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" as a subject is not shown in the English translation.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice --- The verb is either passive or the middle voice so there is a missing "are" or "should be" here.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "arise" is not a command.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is missing.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "afraid" is a verb, not an adjective.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 21 2021