Matthew 5:45 That you may be the children of your Father

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, debts and repayment,parents and children

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

So you might become children of the Father of yours, the one in skies. Since he makes the sun rise up upon worthless ones and worthwhile ones. Also, he showers upon fair ones and unfair ones

My Takeaway: 

We all get good gifts from the hidden Divine despite what is visible to us as "worthy" and "fair."

KJV : 

Matthew 5:45 That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

NIV : 

Matthew 5:45  that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 5:45 In that way, you will be acting as true children of your Father in heaven. For he gives his sunlight to both the evil and the good, and he sends rain on the just and the unjust alike.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In addition to using a number of complementary opposites to illustrate his viewpoints, Jesus also picks a number of words for their double meanings. 

Sun and rain are complementary opposites and both have their positive and negative aspects, but Jesus tends to emphasize the positive. The word translated as "to make to rise" means "to rise above the horizon," but when referring to "brightness," another meaning of "sun," the same word means "to give birth."  The word translated as "make rain" means "shower with wealth."

The opposites of "evil" and "good" are closer in meaning to "worthless" and "capable" if we associate them with people.  Both of these words are The English words "worthless" and "worthwhile" capture them well. These ideas are associated with light and darkness (or knowledge and ignorance) so they are related to the sun. These Greek words are not the only ones  that Jesus uses that are translated as
"good" and "evil." To learn more, please read this article.

The  "just" and "unjust" are associated with rain and wealth. The Greek words are opposite forms of the same root: "unjust" is the negative form of "just." These words might be better translated as "fair" or "unfair," because "fair" and "unfair" emphasize the point that Jesus is making that the Father is not "fair" in this world, at least as we see it.

Wordplay: 

The play on words here is that when applied to the sun, the word means "to rise above the horizon," but when referring to "brightness" another meaning of "sun," it means "to give birth." Using "to wet on" to mean bringing unpleasantness to people. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅπως (conj) "That" is from hopos, which is a conjunction that means "in such a manner as", "in order that", "in the manner in which", "how," [with negative] "there is no way that," and [in questions] "in what way."

γένησθε (2nd pl aor subj mid) "Ye may be" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

υἱοὶ (noun pl masc nom) "Children" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

πατρὸς (noun sg masc gen ) "Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

ὑμῶν (pron pl 2nd gen) "Of your" is from humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "Which"  is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

οὐρανοῖς, (noun pl masc dat) "Heaven" is from ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

ὅτι (adv) "For" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

τὸν (article sg masc acc )  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἥλιον [8 verses](noun sg masc acc ) "Sun" is from helios, which means the "sun", "life", "day", "sunshine", "the sun's heat", "brightness," and the sun-god.

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen ) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀνατέλλει (3rd sg pres ind act) "He maketh...to rise" is anatellô, which means "to rise", "to make rise up", "to give birth", "to gush forth [water]", "to bring forth", "to spring up [plants]", "rise [mountains]," and "to appear above the horizon [sun, moon]."

ἐπὶ (adv) "On" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

πονηροὺς (adj pl masc acc ) "The evil" is from poneros, which means “oppressed by toil,” “burdened,” and “worthless.” Of things, it means “toilsome,” “painful,” and “grievous.” In a moral sense, “worthless,” “base,” and “cowardly.” We discuss extensively in this page.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀγαθοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "The good" is from agathos, which means “sound,” “serviceable,”“useful,”beneficial," and “correct.” When applied to people, it primarily “well-born,” “gentle,” “brave,” “capable,” and "correct.” We discuss it extensively in this page.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

βρέχει[ [3 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Sends rain" is from brecho, which means "to wet", "to moisten", "to shower [with wealth]", "to bath [in sweat]", "to get drunk", "to rain", "to send rain," and "to be filled with water." The noun form is broche (βροχὴ), which means "rain," "moistening," and so on.

ἐπὶ (conj) "On" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

δικαίους (adj pl masc acc) "Just" is from dikaios which means "observant of rules", "observant of customs", "well-ordered", "civilized", "equal", "even," "legally exact", "precise," and "observant of duty." Later it means "well-balanced", "impartial," and "just."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀδίκους. [4 verses](adj pl masc acc) "The unjust' is from adikos, which means "wrongdoing", "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", "unmanageable", "unjust", "unrighteous [of things]," and "one who play unfairly."

KJV Analysis: 

That -- (CW) The word translated as "that" has a number of translations, but it introduces an explanation.

ye  -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

may  -- (CW) This helping verb "may" indicates that the related verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

be  -- (WW) The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen." 

the -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

children -- The word translated as "children" specifically means "sons," but any concept of offspring and often descendants fits. The Greek for "Father" can mean any form of parentage. Christ makes it clear in several places that being a son means emulating the Father. For example, in he says he can claim to be the Son of God (John 10:36) because he does the works of God. He also says that the sons of Abraham would to the works of Abraham (John 8:39). In Christ's definition, sons do what their father desires.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

your -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

which  (WW) -- The word translated as "which" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."\

heaven --(WN) The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.

for -- The Greek word translated as "for" introduced an explanatory clause: "this is because."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

maketh -- The word translated a "maketh rise" has many meanings, depending on the context. It means "to rise up" and "to bring forth," but it is a more colorful word that the word Jesus commonly uses to mean "rise."  It also means for water "to gush forth" and "to give birth." The play on words here is that when applied to the sun, the word means "to rise above the horizon," but when referring to "brightness" another meaning of "sun," it means "to give birth."

"his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sun -- The Greek word for "sun," also means "sunshine" and, more generally, "brightness." Brightness is Christ's metaphor for intelligence. Light is his metaphor for knowledge.

to rise -- This phrase finished the concept of the verb used. 

on -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

evil  --(CW)  The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "the worthless." However, there is no article in front of it, which is typically the case when Christ uses it as a noun. However, its is in a plural form, so it seems to refer a social group, say, derelicts. Especially in contrast to the following word. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

good, -- The adjective translated as "the good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Again, it is in the plural form and without an article ("the") so something like "nobles" worked in Christ's time and maybe "luminaries" in our era. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

sendeth rain -- The Greek word translated on "sendeth the rain" means "to moisten" and "to wet," but it has a lot of additional meanings including "to bath in sweat", "to shower", and "to get drunk." Ir doesn't have any direct connection to teh word rain" in the same way we use "shower on" to mean "rain on". However, this sense also has a specific sense of "showing with wealth." This is the verb from of the Greek word that means "rain" and "irrigation" and other ideas of moistening.

on -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

just -- The Greek word translated as "the just" is an adjective that means "law-abiding", "the virtuous", or "the just". As with the adjectives above, it is not introduced by an article ("the") and it is plural. So the sense is "law-obeyers".

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

on -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "on" in the Greek source.

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

unjust. -- The Greek word translated as "the unjust" means "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", and "unmanageable". In is the negative of the Greek word usually translated as "righteous," which has the sense of "virtue." Again, it is without an article and plural. So "law-breakers".

KJV Translation Issues: 

9
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "that" means "in order that."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "may" doesn't mean permission.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" should be "become."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "Father" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "which" should be "the one."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural, "skies."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "sun" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "evil" does not mean malicious but "worthless."

NIV Analysis: 

that -- (CW) The word translated as "that" has a number of translations, but it introduces an explanation.

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

may  -- (CW) This helping verb "may" indicates that the related verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

be  -- (WW) The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen."

children -- The word translated as "children" specifically means "sons," but any concept of offspring and often descendants fits. The Greek for "Father" can mean any form of parentage. Christ makes it clear in several places that being a son means emulating the Father. For example, in he says he can claim to be the Son of God (John 10:36) because he does the works of God. He also says that the sons of Abraham would to the works of Abraham (John 8:39). In Christ's definition, sons do what their father desires.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

your -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

untranslated "the one"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the one" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."\

heaven -- (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.

untranslated "because"-- (MW) The untranslated word "because" introduces an explanatory clause: "this is because."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

causes -- The word translated a "causes to rise" has many meanings, depending on the context. It means "to rise up" and "to bring forth," but it is a more colorful word that the word Jesus commonly uses to mean "rise."  It also means for water "to gush forth" and "to give birth." The play on words here is that when applied to the sun, the word means "to rise above the horizon," but when referring to "brightness" another meaning of "sun," it means "to give birth."

"his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sun -- The Greek word for "sun," also means "sunshine" and, more generally, "brightness." Brightness is Christ's metaphor for intelligence. Light is his metaphor for knowledge.

to rise -- This phrase finished the concept of the verb used. 

on -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

evil  --(CW)  The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "the worthless." However, there is no article in front of it, which is typically the case when Christ uses it as a noun. However, its is in a plural form, so it seems to refer a social group, say, derelicts. Especially in contrast to the following word. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

good, -- The adjective translated as "the good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Again, it is in the plural form and without an article ("the") so something like "nobles" worked in Christ's time and maybe "luminaries" in our era. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

sends rain  -- The Greek word translated on "sends the rain" means "to moisten" and "to wet," but it has a lot of additional meanings including "to bath in sweat", "to shower", and "to get drunk." Ir doesn't have any direct connection to teh word rain" in the same way we use "shower on" to mean "rain on". However, this sense also has a specific sense of "showing with wealth." This is the verb from of the Greek word that means "rain" and "irrigation" and other ideas of moistening.

on -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

righteous -- The Greek word translated as "righteous " is an adjective that means "law-abiding", "the virtuous", or "the just". As with the adjectives above, it is not introduced by an article ("the") and it is plural. So the sense is "law-obeyers".

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English, an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

unrighteous. -- The Greek word translated as "unrighteous" means "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", and "unmanageable". In is the negative of the Greek word usually translated as "righteous," which has the sense of "virtue." Again, it is without an article and plural. So "law-breakers".

NIV Translation Issues: 

11
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "that" means "in order that."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "may" doesn't mean permission.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" should be "become."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "Father" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural, "skies."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "sun" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "evil" does not mean malicious but "worthless."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word repeated "on" before "good" doesn't exist in the source.

3rd Analysis: 

In that way--  The word translated as "In that way" has a number of translations, but it introduces an explanation.

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- (WW) This helping verb "will" indicates that the related verb is the future tense,it is the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

be  -- (WW) The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen."

acting  -- -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "acting" in the Greek source.

as true -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "as true" in the Greek source.

children -- The word translated as "children" specifically means "sons," but any concept of offspring and often descendants fits. The Greek for "Father" can mean any form of parentage. Christ makes it clear in several places that being a son means emulating the Father. For example, in he says he can claim to be the Son of God (John 10:36) because he does the works of God. He also says that the sons of Abraham would to the works of Abraham (John 8:39). In Christ's definition, sons do what their father desires.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

your -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

untranslated "the one"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the one" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."\

heaven -- (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.

For --  The word "for " introduces an explanatory clause: "this is because."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

gives -- The word translated ""gives" should be "causes to rise" has many meanings, depending on the context. It means "to rise up" and "to bring forth," but it is a more colorful word that the word Jesus commonly uses to mean "rise."  It also means fogr water "to gush forth" and "to give birth." The play on words here is that when applied to the sun, the word means "to rise above the horizon," but when referring to "brightness" another meaning of "sun," it means "to give birth."

"his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sunlight -- The Greek word for "sun," also means "sunshine" and, more generally, "brightness." Brightness is Christ's metaphor for intelligence. Light is his metaphor for knowledge.

to -- (WW) The word translated as "to" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

both -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "both" in the Greek source.

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

evil  --(CW)  The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "the worthless." However, there is no article in front of it, which is typically the case when Christ uses it as a noun. However, its is in a plural form, so it seems to refer a social group, say, derelicts. Especially in contrast to the following word. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

good, -- The adjective translated as "the good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Again, it is in the plural form and without an article ("the") so something like "nobles" worked in Christ's time and maybe "luminaries" in our era. This word is a plural adjective.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

sends rain  -- The Greek word translated on "sends the rain" means "to moisten" and "to wet," but it has a lot of additional meanings including "to bath in sweat", "to shower", and "to get drunk." Ir doesn't have any direct connection to teh word rain" in the same way we use "shower on" to mean "rain on". However, this sense also has a specific sense of "showing with wealth." This is the verb from of the Greek word that means "rain" and "irrigation" and other ideas of moistening.

on -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

just -- The Greek word translated as "the just" is an adjective that means "law-abiding", "the virtuous", or "the just". As with the adjectives above, it is not introduced by an article ("the") and it is plural. So the sense is "law-obeyers".

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the  -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

unjust. -- The Greek word translated as "the unjust" means "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", and "unmanageable". In is the negative of the Greek word usually translated as "righteous," which has the sense of "virtue." Again, it is without an article and plural. So "law-breakers".

alike. -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "alike" in the Greek source.

3rd Issue Count: 

14
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "will" should be "should."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" should be "become."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "acting" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "as true" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "Father" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural, "skies."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "sunlight" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "to" should be "upon."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "both" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "evil" does not mean malicious but "worthless."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "alike" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word repeated "on" before "good" doesn't exist in the source.

evidence: 

44.00

Front Page Date: 

May 21 2020