Vocabulary List

Abel

Ἅβελ [3 verses](Hebrew Name) "Abel" is from Abel, which is the Hebrew name for Adam's second son. It means "transitory" and is a metaphor for "vanity." As with most biblical names, it is not in the form of a Greek word.

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Abraam

Ἀβραὰμ [18 verses](Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham." -- This is from the Greek spelling of "Abraham."

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achri

ἄχρι " [3 verses] (prep, adv) "Until" is from achri, which means "until", "continually", "as far is", "so long as", and "as far as."  - "Until" is from another uncommon word that means "until", but unlike the more common word for "until", it also has the sense of "continually until".

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adelphe

ἀδελφὴ [5 verses] (noun sg fem nom) "Sister" is adelphe, which means "daughter of the same mother", "kinswoman," and it a term of endearment.  - "Sister" is female forms of the word that means "kin," and generally it means "child of the same mother."

adelphos

ἀδελφὸς [37 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Brother" is adelphos, which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother." -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

adikeo

ἀδικῶ [2 verses](verb 1st sg pres ind act) "I do...wrong" is adikeo, which, as a verb means to "be or do wrong," "injure", "harm," in games or contests, "play foul", "sin," and as a noun, "wrong doing", "a wrong", "harm" and "injury."  - "I do...wrong" is from a word that as a verb, as used here, means "to be or do wrong" "to harm," and "to injure," and as a noun means "wrongdoing," and "harm." Jesus only uses this verb twice.

adikia

ἀδικίας.” [5 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Of iniquity" is from adikia, which means "wrongdoing", "injustice", "a wrongful act," and "offense." -- The Greek noun translated as "of iniquity" means "wrongdoing", "injustice", "a wrongful act," and "offense." It is also an uncommon verb for Jesus to use, appearing a couple of time in Luke. A different word meaning "lawless" is used in Matthew. 

adikos

ἀδίκους. [4 verses](adj pl masc acc) "The unjust' is adikos, which means "wrongdoing", "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", "unmanageable", "unjust", "unrighteous [of things]," and "one who play unfairly."The negative prefix of "a" before a form of dikaios usually translaed as "righteous." -- The Greek word translated as "unjust" is from an adjective that means  "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", "unmanageable", "unjust", "unrighteous [of things]," and "one who play unfairly."   In modern terms, we would say "unfair". The noun form means "injustice".  In is the negative of the Greek word usually translated as "righteous," which has the sense of "virtue."

adynateo

() "Shall be impossible" is adynateo, , which means "to be unable to do", "lack strength," and of things, "to be impossible." -- The word translated as "will be impossible" is the negative form of the verb commonly translated as "can," which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

adynateo

ἀδυνατήσει [1 verse](verb 2nd sg fut ind mid or, more likely, verb 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Shall be impossible" is from adynateo, which means "to be unable to do", "lack strength," and of things, "to be impossible." -- The word translated as "will be impossible" is a verb that means "to be unable to do". It is the negative form of the verb commonly translated as "can," which means  "to be able to do," "to have the power to do".  While the form of the verb could be the second person future, "you are going to be unable to do nothing," this double negative would really mean "you are going to be unable to do anything". It could also be the verb form that matches all the verb forms in the sentence, "it will be unable to do anything", with the "it" referring as it has all through the verse, to the stubborn spirit. 

adynatos

ἀδύνατόν [3 verses](adj sg masc/fem/neut acc) "Impossible" is adynatos, which means "unable to do a thing", "without power", "powerless", "without strength", "without skill," "(of things) impossible," and "unrealizable." As an adverb, "weakly," and "feebly."  - "Impossible" is from an adjective that means "unable to do a thing", "without power," and "powerless." Of things, it means "impossible," and "unrealizable." It comes from the negative of the word means "having power." A word that is often translated as "can" in the Greek.

aetos

ἀετοί. [2 verses](noun pl masc nom) "Eagles" is aetos, which means "eagle," (which was considered a bird of omen) "eagle as a standard (of the Roman legions)," and "omen."  - Eagles" is from the Greek word for "eagle", "bird of omen", or "omen." It is a Greek word, but this word was used in the Septuagint to translate the Hebrew word for "eagle" (nesher), which means both "eagle" and "vulture". Among the Jews, it was forbidden to eat eagles, along with buzzards and vultures, so they were grouped among carrion birds. Some uses of this word, such as Micah 1:16, which refers to the baldness of eagles, clearly referring to vultures, which are bald. (Bald eagles, of course, are not bald but have white feathers on their adult heads and were not known in the ancient world.) While there are positive characteristics of eagles in Jewish writing, based on their size and strength. This view of eagles in the West is positive, but this comes from Greek and Roman culture, which had a very positive view of the bird, but they also saw eagles as a bird of omen.

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agalliao

() "Be exceedingly glad" is agalliao means "rejoice exceedingly" and is a later from of agallomai, which means to "glorify," and "exalt," especially the idea of "paying honor" to God.

agapao

Ἀγαπήσεις [32 verses](2nd sg aor subj act) "Love" is agapao, which means "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", "to caress", "to prize", "to desire", "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with."  This love is more associated with affection in relationships where we are obligated. Jesus uses another word. Jesus uses another word, phileô, which means "to love", "to like", "to be fond of doing," and "to show affection" to express "love" in the sense of like and dislike.He never uses the word eros, which describes romantic, sexual love. -- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love" is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translated it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information.

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agape

ἀγάπη [12 verses] (noun sg fem nom) "The love" is agape, which means "the love of a husband and wife", "love of God by man", "brotherly love", "charity," and "alms." -- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "love of spouses" "love of God" and "charity" in the sense of giving to the poor. In the KJV of the Gospels, it is always translated as "love" or "beloved." Christ associates this word with affection rather than passion. In Greek, it is associated with the affection of hugging and embracing someone. See this article on love for more information.

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agathos

ἀγαθὸν [23 verses](adj sg neut nom) "Good" is agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." -- The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. As a noun, the word "valuables" makes the idea clearer than "goods".  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

aggareuo

ἀγγαρεύσει [unique] (3rd sg aor subj act) subj act) "Shall compel...to go" is from aggareuo, which means "to press into service." -- The word translated as "compel" means "to press into service." It is an uncommon word for Christ to use. In the Bible it appears only here and in the story of Simon of Cyrene so its sense if very specific.

aggelos

ἀγγέλους [25 verses](noun pl masc/fem acc) "Angels" is from aggelos, (aggelos) which means "messenger" and "envoy." "Angels" is aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use. -- (UW)  "Angels" is a noun meaning "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use from its use in the NT. Jesus uses this word to describe the means by which Jesus communicates to us and our thoughts.

agnaphos

ἀγνάφου [2 verses](adj sg neut gen) "New" is agnaphos, which means "uncarded", "unmilled", "unfulled", "undressed," and "unprocessed." -- The word translated as "new" means "unfinished" or "unprocessed."

ago

ἀχθήσεσθε [40 verses](2nd pl fut ind pass) "Shall be brought" is ago, which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight." -- "Shall be brought" is a Greek word which means "to lead", "to carry," or "to fetch" and has a lot of different specific meanings in different contexts. Not all of these are negative, for example, this phrase could mean "guided." It is in the passives, future, so "you a going to be guided."

agora

ἀγοραῖς [7 verses](noun pl fem dat) "Markets" is agora, which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace. "  -- The word translated as "marketplaces" means "a place of assembly." Its verb form that means "to buy in a market" and its root means "a field." 

agorazo

ἀγοράζει [8 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Buy" is agorazo, which means "to occupy a marketplace", "to buy in the market," and "to buy for oneself." -- "Bought" is a verb that Jesus only uses eight times that means "to occupy a marketplace", "to buy in the market," and "to buy for oneself." Jesus always seems to use it in the sense of "buy for oneself."

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agros

ἀγρῷ; [22 verses](noun sg masc dat) "Field" is agros, which means "field", "lands," or "country." -- "Field" is from the common noun that means "field", "lands," or "countryside."

ainos

αἶνον [1 verse](noun sg masc acc) "Praise" is ainos, which means "tale", "story," esp. "story with moral", "fable," generally, "saying", "proverb," also "praise" "decree," and "resolution." It is from the verb, aineô, which means "to praise" and "to approve." It means "to be content with" and "to acquiesce in " a decision. It means "to recommend", "to advise," and "to approve."  - The word is translated as "praise," is either a Greek noun that means "tale" or "story" especially stories with a moral. More generally, it means "saying" a "proverb" and it came to be a "decree" and "praise" (as in a story praising someone). It comes from the verb of approving of someone and complementing them on what they have done. It means making recommendations and advise, but ultimately accepting the decision of a superior. In the original Hebrew this word means "might," and "strength."

aion

αἰῶνος: [41 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Age" is aion, which means "life", "lifetime", "age," or "generation." -- "World" is from aiôn, which means "lifetime", "life", "a space of time", "an age," an epoch," and "the present world." See this article on words translated as "world" in Jesus's words

aionios

αἰώνιον. [23 verses](adj sg neut acc) "Everlasting" is aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." -- "Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

airo

ἀράτω [56 verses](verb 3rd sg aor imperat act) "Take up" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is the same as apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." -- "Shall be taken" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," "lifted" in the sense of "removed," and "to cause to cease." Jesus uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross. The verb also came to mean "remove" in the same way we describe stealing as "shoplifting."

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aiteo

αἰτοῦντί [28 verses](part sg pres act masc dat) "asketh" is from aiteo, which means "to ask for", "to demand", "to beg of", "to postulate or assume [in logic]", "to claim," and "to ask for one's own use." In passive, "to be asked" and "to have a thing begged from one." -- The Greek word translated as "asketh" means "ask" but has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It means to beg or even to demand something from someone else.

akantha

ἀκανθῶν [8 verses](noun pl fem gen) "Thorns" is akantha, which means "thorn", "prickle," or "any thorny or prickly plant." It is also a metaphor for a "thorny" question. -- The Greek words translated as "thorns" and "thistles" both mean any type of thorny plant. Two different words are used because this is a reference to Gen 3:18, where two different Hebrew words are used. This means that two different Greek words are used in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The same exact ones used here. In Jewish tradition, thorns did not exist in the original creation, but were created after humanity's fall.

akarpos

ἄκαρπος[4 verses] (adj sg masc nom) "Unfruitful" is from akarpos, which means "barren", "unfrutiful," and is a metaphor for 'unprofitable."  - "Unfruitful" is from an adjective which means "barren", "unfrutiful," and is a metaphor for 'unprofitable."

akatharsia

ἀκαθαρσίας: [1 vese](noun sg fem acc/gen ) "Uncleanness" is akatharsia, which means "uncleanness", "foulness," referring specifically to a wound or sore, generally, "dirt", "filth," in moral sense, "depravity", "ceremonial impurity." and literally "not cleaned.

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akathartos

ἀκάθαρτον [3 verses](adj sg neut nom) "Unclean" is akathartos, which means "foul", "uncleansed", "ceremonially unclean" (of food}, "not sifted", "containing impurities", "not fit for cleansing," and "morally unclean." It was the term used to refer to a woman's menses.  - "Unclean" is an adjective that means "foul", "uncleansed," and "morally unclean." It was the term used to refer to a woman's menses.

akeraios

() "Harmless" is akeraios, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible." -- "Harmless" is translated from a Greek word, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptibleakeraios, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible." -- "Harmless" is translated from a Greek word, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible

akmen

Ἀκμὴν [1 verse](adv) "Yet" is akmen, which as a noun means "a point", "edge," "extremity," generally, highest or culminating point of anything, therefore a "flower," one's "prime," a "zenith," esp. of man's age, generally, "strength", "vigor", "supreme effort", "culmination", "climax," of Time, "the best, most fitting time," "the nick of time," and "a critical moment."  - "Yet" is from an adverbial form of a noun which means the highest or culminating point of anything, a "zenith," esp. of man's age, generally, "supreme effort," "climax," an, of Time, "the best, most fitting time," or "a critical moment." In English, we would say "at this critical point." Jesus only uses this word once.

akoe

Ἀκοῇ [3 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Hearing" is akoe, which means "hearing", "sound heard", "thing heard", "tidings", "sense of hearing", "act of hearing", "ear", "listening to", "obedience", "a hearing," and, in plural, "place where supernatural voices are heard,"  -  - - (CW) The Greek word translated as "hearing" is the noun describing the sense of hearing, the ear, and related ideas. One of its meanings is "obedience." As we say, "That child needs to listen to me."This is important because the original Hebrew word, shama, also has this sense of obedience, though it was a verb in the form of a command, rather than a noun. This word is only use by Jesus three times. It is not the common word translated as "hear."

akoloutheo

ἀκολουθεῖ [22 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act)  "Follow" is akoloutheo, which means "to follow," and "to go with." It also means "to be guided by" and means following a leader as a disciple. -- The term "follow" means "to follow," or "go with," in a physical sense, but it is also a metaphor meaning "to be guided by" or "to follow the meaning of."

akouo

ἀκούετε [95 verses](2nd pl imperf ind act) "Shall hear" is akouo, (ἀκούω) which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  - -- "Heard" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  It is the most common verb that Christ uses meaning "to hear". It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent."

akrasia

ἀκρασίας. [1 verse](noun sg fem gen) "Excess" is akrasia, which means "bad mixture" (of meats), "ill temperature," and "unwholesome" climate.

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akron

ἄκρων [3 verses](adj pl masc gen) "One end" is akron, which means "highest", "furthest point", "outermost", "mountain top", "edge", "peak", "headland", "extremity," and "end." -- (CW) "End" is a noun that means "highest", "furthest point", "mountain top", "peak", "headland", "extremity," and "end."

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akuroo

ἠκυρώσατε [1 verse](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Have ye made...of none effect" is akuroo, which means "to cancel", "to set aside," and "to treat as if it has no effect." It is a metaphor for "to render powerless." -- "Have ye made...of none effect" is from a Greek verb that means "to cancel", "to set aside," and "to treat as if it has no effect." It is a metaphor for "to render powerless."

aletheia

ἀληθείᾳ: () "Truth" is aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances. -- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem.

aletho

ἀλήθουσαι [2 verses] (part pl pres act fem nom) "Grind" is from aletho, which is a form of aleo, which means "to grind", "to bruise," and "to mill."  - The Greek verb translated as "two women shall be grinding" is from a verb that means "to grind" and "to mill." It is in the form of an adjective, "grinding", in the feminine word form (hence "woman") and in the present tense, not the future.

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alethos

ἀληθῶς [8 verses](adv) "Indeed""Of a truth" is alethos, which means "unconcealed", "so true", "real", "true," [as an adverb] "actually", "really", "realizing itself", "coming to fulfillment", "not forgetting," and "careful."   -- "Of a truth" means "unconcealed", "so true", "real", "true," [as an adverb] "actually", "really." It is a Greek adverb not commonly used by Jesus in the other Synoptic Gospels. Luke it to replace the Aramaic word amen ("truly").

aleuron

ἀλεύρου [2 verses](noun sg neut gen) "Of meal" is aleuron, which means "wheat-meal," "barley-meal," or, generally, "meal," as in "coarse flour," - "Meal" is the Greek word that means "wheat-meal," "barley-meal," or, generally, "meal," as in "coarse flour,"

alla

ἀλλ᾽ [154 verses](conj) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise". Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this."

allelon

ἀλλήλους [13 verses] (adj pl masc acc) "One another" is allelon, which means "one another", "to one another", "mutually," and "reciprocally."

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allos

ἄλλην [34 verses](adj sg fem acc) "The other" is allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," {with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."  - The "another" here is feminine, making it clear that it refers to another woman more clearly than the English translation. - - The "others" here is masculine, plural, making it clear that it refers to a group of people.

allotrios

ἀλλοτρίων;[3 verses] "Stranger" is allotrios, which means "belonging to another", "stranger", "foreign", "hostile", "alien", "unfavorably disposed", "abnormal," and "foreign to the purpose," and "strange."  - "Strangers" is from a Greek word that means "belonging to another." So it refers to possessions that belong to others, not just those that are unknown.

alopex

ἀλώπεκες [3 verses](noun pl fem nom)"Foxes" is alopex, which means "fox", "Canis vulpes", "a large bat", "muscles of the loins", "mange," and "a type of dance." -- The word for "fox" is, in Greek as English, the metaphor for a sly, crafty man.

amen

ἀμὴν [91 verses](exclaim)"Verily" is amen, which is the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut." -- The word translated as "verily" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

ampelon

ἀμπελῶνα [19 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Vineyard" is ampelon which means simply "vineyard." -- The Greek word for "vineyard" only means "vineyard.

amphiennumi

ἠμφιεσμένον; [2 verses](part sg perf mp neut nom/acc) "Clothed" is from amphiennumi, which means "to put on" or "to put around." It is also used to mean "to dress oneself in."  - "Clothed" is a verb in the form of an adjective ("clothing") that means "to put on" or "to put around" so "wrapping". It is also used to mean "to dress oneself in." It is not an active verb, as shown in the KJV. It is in a form where the subject acts on himself, "wrapping himself". Its form matches "a man" so "a man wrapping himself".

amphiennymi

ἀμφιέννυσιν, [2 verses] (3rd sg pres ind act) "Clothe" is from amphiennymi, which means "put round", "clothed in", "wearing", "clothe one in or with", "put on oneself," and "dress oneself in.  - - The Greek verb translated as "clothe" means "to cloth" much more than the other verbs Christ uses in this section, but this verb is uncommon for Christ Unlike the verb in Matthew 6:29, which has more the sense of "put on" or "wrapped around," this verb has a similar primary meaning, "put around," but its secondary meanings all involved putting on clothing. This verb also appears toward the end of the phrase, de-emphasizing it.

amphoteroi

ἀμφότερα [5 verses](adj pl neut acc) "Both" is amphoteroi, which means "either", "both of two", "both together", "towards both sides", "both ways", "on both sides," and "all together." -- The word translated as "both" means "both sides" and "both ways" as well as "both together." It is chosen because unlike the common word for "both," it implies two different ways or sides together.

an

ἂν [60 verses](particle) "Should be" is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."  -- Untranslated is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English but "possibly" is close. This word works similarly to the "might" or "should" of a subjunctive verb, but we don't want to confuse it with the subjunctive so using "possibly" provides a consistent translation.  This particle usually suggests the subjunctive form of the verb but can be used without it. The same Greek letters can always be the more common conjunction meaning "when," so this meaning comes from context.

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ana

ἀνὰ [6 verses](prep) "On"  is ana, which is a preposition that with the genitive, means "on board" a ship.With accusative, implies upward motion; of place, "from bottom to top" or "up along;" of time, "throughout;" of mind, "to have continually" in mind, " as an adverb, "thereupon," "throughout", "all over," "up," and "arising. -- "By" is from an uncommon prepositions that means on board (a ship),"  "upon," of Place: "up", "from bottom to top", "up along," of Time, "throughout," and, metaphorically, "continually in", "in," and "among." The sense here is "up to". 

anabaino

 ἀναβέβηκα [14 verses]( verb 1st sg perf ind act ) "I am...ascended" is anabainô, which means "to go up", "to mount," and "to turn up." It is the word used for mounting a horse, going aboard a ship, or ascending to heaven. For plants, it is used specifically to describe when plants grow on sticks or other plants, entwining them, or "mounting" them.  - "I ascend" means "to go up", "to mount," and "to turn up." It has a lot of specific meanings including "ascending to higher knowledge." "Sprung up" is used specifically to describe when plants grow on sticks or other plants, entwining them, or "mounting" them.

anablepô

ναβλέπουσιν [3 verses](3rd pl pres ind act) "Receive their sight" is anablepô, which means "to look up", "recover sight", "open one's eye's" and, metaphorically, "revive."  - "Receive their sight" is a Greek verb that means "to look up", "recover sight", "open one's eye's" and, metaphorically, "revive."

anachōreō

Ἀναχωρεῖτε, [1 verse]( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Give place" is  anachōreō, which means to "go back," "walk backwards," and "withdraw."  - "Give place" is used by Jesus uniquely here. It means to "go back," "walk backwards," and "withdraw."

anachoreo

Ἀναχωρεῖτε, [1 verse]( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Give place" is  anachōreō, which means to "go back," "walk backwards," and "withdraw."  - "Give place" is used by Jesus uniquely here. It means to "go back," "walk backwards," and "withdraw."

1
anagignosko

ἀνέγνωτε [4 verses] (2nd pl aor ind act) "Ye read" is anagignôskô, which means to "know well", "know certainly", "perceive", "attend lectures on", "acknowledge", "recognize", "induce" one to do a thing, "persuade", "convince," of books. "read aloud", "published," in the passive, "to be persuaded" to do a thing, and, as a noun, "students" (those who attend lectures).  - "Ye...read" is  a Greek verb that means "to know well", "to acknowledge", "to persuade," and "to recognize." It doesn't  "read" in the normal sense, Christ uses a different Greek word to mean "read," but this one can mean "to read aloud" or "to attend a lecture." This perhaps refers to the Jewish practice of reading the scriptures at meetings.

anaginosko

ἀνέγνωτε [9 verses](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Have ye...read"is from anaginosko, which means "to recognize", "to know well", "to know certainly", "to know again", "to own," and "to acknowledge." --  "Readest thou" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

anaitios

ἀναίτιοί [2 verses](adj pl masc nom) "Blameless" is anaitios, which means "not being at fault", "guiltless," and "not being the cause" of something. It means literally "not the cause."  - "Blameless" is from an adjective means "not being at fault", "guiltless," and "not being the cause" of something. It means literally "not the cause". There is no English word that means that something is "not the cause". Of course, something that is not the cause is "blameless" but the sense is that they do not choose this, the law does. 

anakeimai

ἀνακειμένων. [3 verses](part pl pres mp masc gen) "With guest" is anakeimai, which means to "be laid up" as a votive offering in the temple, "to be dedicated", "to be set up" as a statue in public, "to be put aside", "lie at table," and "recline."  - The word translated as "with guests" doesn't mean that at all. It means "be laid up" as a votive offering in the temple, "to be dedicated", "lie at table" and "reclining." Since guests reclined at tables in Greek times, this describes people reclining.

3
anakeimai

τε [4 verses](partic) "Both" is from te, which means "both...and," when joining single words. -- The word translated as "both" is a particle that Jesus rarely used, but which is common from the writers of the New Testament.

3
anaklino

ἀνακλιθήσονται [3 verses](3rd pl fut ind pass) "Shall sit down," is anaklino, which means "to lean one thing upon another", "to cause to recline at a table", "to push", "to put back", "to open," and, in the passive, "to lie", "to sink", "to lean back", "to recline," and "to slope upwards (of ground)." -- The word translated as "sit down" means to "lean against" or "to be made to recline" by someone else, but here it is in the passive. In that form, it means "to recline" and "to sink" by oneself. Of course, at the time, people reclined to eat, but the sense of sinking below the patriarchs is part of its meaning.

anamnesis,

ἀνάμνησιν. [1 verse] (noun sg fem acc) "Rememberance" is anamnesis, which means "calling to mind", "reminiscence", and "recall to memory". 

1
anapauo

ἀναπαύσω [5 verses](1st sg fut ind act) "Will give...rest" is from anapauo, which means "to make to cease", "stop or hinder", "put an end to," "to relieve from,""bring to a close", "take rest", "sleep", "lie fallow", "regain strength," and "rest or settle [on an object]."  - - "Rest" is a Greek verb, which means "to make to cease", "to relieve from", "to put and end to", "to rest," and "to take rest." This is in the future tense.

anapausis

ἀνάπαυσιν [3 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Rest" is anapausis, which means "cessation of motion", "rest", "rest from a thing," and "relaxation."  - "Rest" is  a Greek noun that means "rest", "repose", "relaxation," and "recreation." It is a compound word meaning a "pause between," what we describe as a "work break," but here, because the context is "breath" (see below).

anapipto

 [uncommon](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Sit down" is anapipto, which means to "fall back", "give ground", "lifeless", of style, of a plan "to be given up",  and "recline" at meals. -- The active verb translated as "sit down" means to "fall back", "give ground", "lifeless", of style, of a plan "to be given up",  and "recline" at meals. It is a play on words,  meaning both "recline" at the mean and "retreat". 

anapleroo

ἀναπληροῦται [1 verse](verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Is fulfilled" is anapleroo, which means "to fill up" a void, "to pay in full", "to supply," and "to make up." In the passive, it is "to be filled up," and "to be restored to its former size or state."  - "Is fulfilled" is from a Greek verb that means "to fill up" a void, "to pay in full", "to supply," and "to make up." It is the form where the subject acts on itself, so "filled itself up."

anastasis

ἀναστάσει [7 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Resurrection" is anastasis, which means, "a standing up", "removal", "a rising up", "a setting up," and "rising from a seat." It is the noun form of anistêmi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise", "to wake up", "to build up", "to restore", "to rouse to action", "to stir up," and "to make people rise."  - While the Greek word translated as "resurrection" is understood that way today, during Jesus's time, it would have meant simply "a rising up" or "awakening." It was used to indicate someone standing up especially when awakening from sleep.

7
anatellô

ἀνατείλαντος [7 verses](part sg aor act masc gen) is anatellô, which means "to rise", "to make rise up", "to give birth", "to gush forth [water]", "to bring forth", "to spring up [plants]", "rise [mountains]," and "to appear above the horizon [sun,moon]." -- The Greek verb translated as "rise out" means "to rise", "to make rise up", "to give birth", "to gush forth [water]", "to bring forth", "to spring up [plants]", "rise [mountains]," and "to appear above the horizon [sun,moon]."

anatole

ἀνατολῶν [3 verses](noun pl fem gen) "East" is anatole, which means "rising above the horizon (of any heavenly body)", "the quarter of sunrise", "east", "the ascendant (i.e. the point where the eastern horizon cuts the zodiac)", "a phase of new moon," "sources of a river (in pl.), and "growing ( of the teeth)." -- The word translated as "east" primarily refers to the rising of heavenly bodies above the horizon. It comes to mean "east" because that is the direction in which heavenly bodies arise. However, it also refers to the sources of a river when it is in the plural as it is here.

3
anechomai

ἀνέξομαι [3 verses](verb 1st sg fut ind mid) "Suffer" is anechomai, which means "to hold up", "to lift up", "sustain", "appear", "show oneself", "stand up", "come forth", "hold on", "keep doing", "hold up", "cease", "hold up what is one's own", "hold oneself up", "bear up", "be of good courage," rarely, "hold on by one another", "hang together," (of events) "arise,""happen," and, metaph., "uphold," and "maintain."  - The word translated as "suffer" primarily means "to hold up", "to lift up", "sustain", "appear," with a lot of related meaning about supporting yourself or others. This word is only used in this verse and its parallel in Mark and Luke. 

anektoteros

ἀνεκτότερον (adj sg neut nom comp ) More tolerable" is anektoteros (the comparative "more" form of anektos), which "bearable", "sufferable", "that which can be endured," or "tolerable." -- "More tolerable" is the comparative form ("more") of an adjective which "bearable" or "sufferable."

anemos

ἄνεμοι [6 verses](noun pl masc nom ) "The winds" is anemos, which means "wind", "a cardinal point," or "quarter." It means both the physical wind and the direction from which the wind comes.  - - The word translated as "the winds" means both the physical wind and the directions from which the wind comes.

aner

ἀνδρὶ [8 verses](noun sg masc dat) "The men" is from aner, which means "a man (as opposed to a god)", "a man (as opposed to a woman)", "a husband", "a man in the prime of life (as opposed to a youth)," and "a man indeed." -- "Men" is a noun that isn't the normal Greek word translated as "man" but a special word that indicates that manliness of "men," both for good and bad. In English, we would say "male." It emphasizes the adult man when compared to a youth or the mortality of a man when compared to the divinity of God. It is also used to mean "husband."

anethon

ἄνηθον [1 verse] (noun sg neut acc) "Anise" is anethon, which means "dill."

1
aneu

ἄνευ [1 verse](prep) "Without" is aneu, which means "without", "far from," "besides", "clear of", and "except." t -- "Without" is a Greek pronoun which Christ only uses here. It means "without", "far from," and "except." Interestingly, Jesus uses a different pronoun also meaning "without" only two other times. This "without" has the sense of "without permission."

anipto

ἀνίπτοις [1 verse](adj pl fem dat) "unwashen" is from anipto," which means "unwashen", "unprepared," and "not washed out."  - - The word "unwashen" is an adjective that means that something is "unwashed" or has never been washed.

anistemi

ἀναστήσονται [29 verses](3rd pl fut ind mid) "Shall rise" is from anistemi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise up", "to raise from sleep", "to wake up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action", "to put up for sale", "to make people rise", "to emigrate", "to transplant," and "to rise and leave the sanctuary." -- "Shall rise " is a Greek verb that means "to make to stand up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action," and "to make people rise up."

anoigo

ἀνοιγήσεται [9 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "Open" is anoigo, which means "to open", "to throw open," and "to disclose." -- The term for "open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." It means revealing something that is there, but that you cannot access.

anomia

ἀνομίαν.” [4 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Inequity" is anomia, which means "lawless", "lawless conduct," and "the negation of law." -- "Inequity" is translated from a Greek word meaning "lawlessness." It means violating customs and common standards of civility, so "immorality" and "criminality."

anothen

ἄνωθεν [4 verses] (adv) "Again" is from anothen, which means "from above", "from on high," [in a narrative] "from the beginning" or "from further back", "higher", "more universal," [NT translation] "over again", "anew," and "afresh."

4
anthihestimi

( () "Ye resist" is anthihestimi, which "to set against", "to match with", "to compare", "to stand against", "to withstand", "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand."

anthropos

ἄνθρωπος [209 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Of man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

anti

ἀντὶ [9 verses](prep) "For" is anti, which means "opposite", "over against", "instead", "in place of", "at the price of", "in return for", "for the sake of", "against", "in return", "equal to", "corresponding to," and "mutually." -- The word translated as "for" has many meanings that fit this context: "in place of", "at the price of", "in return for," and "for the sake of." However, in English, this Greek word, anti, is from its primary meaning "opposite."

antidikos

() "Adversary" is antidikos ( ἀντίδικος ), which means "opponent or adversary in a suit", "the defendant [primarily]," "the plaintiff," and, generally, "opponent," and "adversary."  -- The word translated as "adversary" primarily means an opponent in a lawsuit, but it can be used to mean opponents in general.

antleo

Ἀντλήσατε [1 verses](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Draw out" is from antleo, whih means to "bale out bilge-water," "bale the ship," and "draw water," but it is a metaphor for "drain dry," "use the utmost," and "make the most of."  - -- "Draw out" is a word that Jesus only uses here, it means "bale out bilge-water," "bale the ship," and "draw water," but it is a metaphor for "drain dry," "use the utmost," and "make the most of."

apaggello

ἀπαγγείλατε [3 verses](2nd pl aor imperat act) "And shew...again" is from apaggello, which means to "bring tidings", "report", "describe," and "explain or interpret (a dream or riddle)". From the noun, aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoy" and which is the word from which we get "angels." -- Though the word translated as "shew" is in the expected form of a command, it has the specific meaning of bringing someone news or explaining a dream or a riddle or, in this case, miracles. It is the verb form of the Greek word we translated as "angel", which actually means "messenger". Its prefix means "away from" or "out" so the literal meaning is "send a message out". "Report" or, since we are talking about miracles, "reveal" works.

apago

ἀπάγουσα [3 verses](part sg pres act fem nom) "Leadeth" is apago, which means to "lead away", "carry off", "hold far off", "draw off", "retire", "withdraw", "abduct", "bring back", "bring home", "return", "render what one owes", "pay", "render service," and "arrest and carry off."  - The Greek translated as "Leadeth" means "to lead". "to carry away", "to pay" and "to render a service." It is an uncommon word for Jesus to use.

aparneomai

ἀρνήσηταί [9 verses](3rd sg fut ind mp or verb 3rd sg aor subj mp ) "Shall deny" is from aparneomai, which means "to deny utterly", "to refuse", "to reject," and "to deny." -- "Deny" is translated from a Greek word that means "to rejects" and "to deny utterly." The form is either the future tense or a tense meaning something that might happen at some specific time, past, present, or future. If the word is the "at some time" tense, it is in a form that indicates something that "might" happen. This later "might at some time" form is always used with "if" clauses, which is the sense here.

apate

ἀπάτη [3 verses] (noun sg fem nom) "Deceitfulness" is apate , which means "trick", "deceit", "guile", "treachery," and "fraud."  - "Deceitfulness" is from a noun that means "trick", "deceit", "treachery," and "fraud."

apecho

ἀπέχουσιν [8 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind act "They have" is apecho, which means "to keep off or away from", "to hold one's hands off or away from", "to hold oneself off a thing", "to abstain or desist from it," "to project", "to extend", "to be far from," and "to receive payment in full." -- This verb literally means "to have from" or "to keep from." The "have from" meaning in business translations becomes "to receive payment in full." The sense of "keep from" means  "to keep off or away from" or "to hold away from." So this word not only has a double meaning but , amusingly,  almost contradictory meanings. 

aperchomai

ἀπῆλθεν. [22 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Go away" is aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life." -- The Greek verb translated as  "departed" means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life." 

aphaireo

ἀφαιρεθήσεται [2 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall...be taken away" is from aphaireo which means to "take away from", "set aside", "exclude", "separate",   "prevent", "hinder from" doing, and, in the passive,  "to be robbed or deprived of a thing. -- "Shall...be taken away" is another uncommon Greek word, which means to "take away from", "set aside", "exclude", and "to be robbed or deprived of a thing. 

aphanizo

ἀφανίζει,[3 verses] (verb 3rd sg pres ind act or verb 2nd sg pres ind mp) "They disfigure" is aphanizo, which means "to make unseen", "to hide", "to vanish" "to hush up", "to do away with", "to reject, "to remove", "to destroy", "to obliterate [writing], "to spirit away [a witness]", "to secrete", "to steal", "to obscure", "to mar", "to disguise [by dyeing]", "to spoil", "to make away with", "to drain [a cup of wine]," or "deprive of luster." -- The Greek verb translated as "to disfigure" encompasses many different forms of hiding or concealing something.

aphedron

ἀφεδρῶνα [2 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Draught" is from aphedron, means "toilet" or "privy." It means literally "separate from sitting." A similar word was used in the Greek translation of Lev 12:5 to describe the separation of a woman bleeding after childbirth. The source seems to be a vulgar Macedonian word.  - The word translated as "draught" which means "toilet" or "privy. It is a word that only appears in the NT here to describe a place for dumping human waste. A lot of Bible translations skip this word because...

aphesis

ἄφεσιν  [4 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Forgiveness" is the noun aphesis, which means "letting go", "release", "relaxation", "exhaustion," exemption from attendance", "leave of absence", "divorce, and "the beginning [of anything]".  - - (CW) "Forgiveness" is the noun aphesis, which means "letting go", "release", "relaxation", "exhaustion," "liberty," "exemption from attendance", "leave of absence", "divorce," and "the beginning [of anything]". It is the noun form of the word usually translated as "forgive" in the NT that has a meaning closer to "let go."

aphiemi

Ἄφες [73 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Let" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -- The word translated as "forgive" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. See this article for more. It has the sense of leaving something alone and letting it drop.

73
aphorizo

ἀφοριοῦσιν [3 verses](verb 3rd pl fut ind act attic ) "Sever" is aphorizo which means "to mark off boundaries", "to separate", "distinguish", "bring to an end," "finish," "grant as a special gift", "banish", "set apart for rejection," and "distinguish."  - "Sever" is a verb which means "to mark off boundaries," and "to separate" in the sense of "distinguish" as well as "to banish."

apistos

ἄπιστος [5 verses](adj sg fem voc/n0m) "Faithless" is apistos, which means "not to be trusted" "mistrustful", "incredulous," disobedient, "disloyal," or "suspicious."  - The Greek word translated as "faithless" means literally "no faith," but it meant "not to be trusted" and "mistrustful."

apo

ἀπὸ [190 verses]​(prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done.  Usually takes the genitive object. -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both locations and when referring to a source or a cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done and "away from."

190
apochoreo

ἀποχωρεῖτε [1 verse](2nd pl pres ind act) "Depart" is apochoreo, which means to "go from" "go away from", "depart," "withdraw from", "give up possession of", "dissent from opinions", "turn out [people]", "to be successful", "to have recourse," and "to be distant [of places]." It also means "to excrete" when referring to bodily excretions, which may be the humor here. This word is only used one in the Septuagint, Jer 46:5 , where it is used to translated the Hebrew cuwg that means "to turn back." It is from two words, the preposition meaning "from" (same as the preposition below) and -choreo that means "to leave room for another", and "to make way". -- The verb "depart" means "to go away from" "to go forward", "to make progress", and "to advance". It also means "to excrete" bodily wastes.

apodekatoo

ἀποδεκατοῦτε [3 verses] (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Pay tithe" is apodekatoo, which means to "tithe," "to take a tenth of," or "to pay a tithe." It is only used in the NT and is a combination of two Greek words "apo" ("from") and "dekatoo," ("to take a tenth").  - A made-up koined word is translated as "ye pay tithes." It appears only in the Gospels and an uncommon one for Jesus. It reverses the meaning of the normal word that means "to take a tenth" by adding the word "from" to it as a prefix. The sense is, "I take a tenth from [myself]."

3
apodemeo

ἀπεδήμησεν. [5 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Went to a far country" is apodemeo, which means "to be far from home", "to be abroad", "to be on one's travels," and "to go abroad."  - - The verb translated as "went to a far country" that means "to be far from home" and "to go abroad." This word is used five times by Jesus, always in parables, always about a master go trusting his property to others.

apodidomi

ἀποδώσει [22 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "He shall reward"is apodidomi which means "to give back", "to restore," and "to deliver." It has the economic sense of "to sell" or "to give something for one's own profit." It begins with apo the preposition of separation and origin, the idea of "from" in English, -didômi which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," and "to describe." -- "Are delivered" is a compound verb that means "to give back", "to give over," and "to transmit." It literally means "to give from".  The form is  singular, "it has been given over." The subject may refer back to the previous verse, Luke 10:21, describing the idea of "goodwill" or "contentment."

22
apodokimazo

ἀπεδοκίμασαν [5 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Rejected" is apodokimazô, which means specifically "reject on scrutiny", "reject as unfit or unworthy," and "reject for want of qualifications."  - -- "Rejected" is a verb that means specifically "reject on scrutiny", "reject as unfit or unworthy," and "reject for want of qualifications."  Referring to a stone used to build a wall, we would say "reject as unfitting."

apokalupto

ἀποκαλυφθήσεται, [7 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall...be revealed" is apokalupto, which means to "uncover", "disclose", "reveal," unmask", "make bare," "become known," (middle passive) "reveal one's whole mind," (passive) "be made known," and as an adjective, "naked," and "shameless." It is the opposite of kaluptô, "to cover" and "to hide."-- "Shall...be revealed" is a compound form of the word meaning "to cover" and "to hide "with an "away from" which reverses its meaning, so it means to uncover or reveal and, in the passive, "to become known. " -- "Answered" is from a verb that means to "set apart," "choose", "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated." Here, it is used as a noun and in the passive so "the one separated out." We saw the first use of this verb in Matthew 20:13, where it was used in exactly the same form.

apokathistemi

ἀποκαταστήσει” [2 verses](verb 3rd sg fut/aor ind/subj act) "Restore" is apokathistêmi, which means "re-establish", "restore", "reinstate", "pay [what is due]", "hand over", "deliver," and "return."  - -- "Restore" is from a Greek, which means "reestablish", "restore", "reinstate," and "return." Its base is a word that means "to stand" or "to set up."  This word is only used here and in the Mark parallel,.

apokrinomai

ἀποκριθεὶς [17 verses](part sg aor pass masc nom) "Answered" is from apokrinomai that means to "set apart," "choose", "exclude," "reject on examination", "decide", "answer" the question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself" and, in the passive, "to be parted or separated." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question. -- "Answered" is from a verb that means to "set apart," "choose", "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question.  In the Gospels, it is always translated as "answered."

apokteino

ἀποκτενοῦσιν [31 verses](verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "To kill" "To kill" is apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (-kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from." but it is a stronger form than the normal verb -kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying"). -- "To kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

apoleia

ἀπώλειαν, [2 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Destruction" is apoleia, which means "destruction," and "loss", and "thing lost."  - The term used for "destruction" also means a "loss" and is often used to describe the destruction of sea vessels in the same sense we would use "wrecked." It has a secondary economic meaning of "financial ruin". Elsewhere in the NT it is translated as "waste". This word is only used twice by Jesus, but it appears seventy-four times in Greek OT.

apollymi

ἀπολέσει [43 verses](3rd sg fut ind act or verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Should perish" is apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone." -- The word translated as "perish" means to destroy or demolish.

apolyo

ἀπολύων [13 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) " "Shall put away" is apolyo. which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone." -- The Greek verb translated as "thou art loosed" means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]". Its root is the word that means "untie" with the sense of "untie from," so our word "released."

apopnigo

ἀπέπνιξαν  [3 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Choked" is apopnigô, which "to suffocate", "to choke", "to cut off", "to kill," "to suffocate," and "to be drowned." As in English, the is used to denote being choked with rage or frustration. - "Choked" is a verb that means "to choke", "to suffocate," and "to be drowned." As in English, it is used to denote being choked with rage or annoyance.

apostasion

ἀποστάσιον.” [1 verse](part sg fut act neut acc) "A writing of divorcement" is apostasion, which is most likely the future participle of the verb, aphesteco, which means "to be absent" or "to be away from." The sense in the Greek here is that divorce is but one step away from adultery. -- This "writing of divorce" is not the a Greek word for "divorce" or "divorce papers." It isn't a noun at all, but a verb meaning "to be absent" or "to be away from." It is in the form of an adjective, "going-to-be-absent" or, since it is used as a noun "a going-to-be-absent" or as we would say in English, a "going to leave you note.". This is the Greek word used in the Septuagint for divorce papers, starting with Deu 24:1.There is even a connection to idolatry, which we will discuss in the next verse.

apostello

ἀποστέλλω [60 verses](1st sg pres ind act) "Send" is apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch." -- The "send forth" here is a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

apostrepho

() ἀποστραφῇς. [2 verses](2nd sg aor subj pass ) "From...turn...thou away." is from apostrepho, which means "to turn back", "to guide back", "to turn away", "to dissuade from", "to bring back," and "to recall." In the passive, it means to "be turned back," "turn oneself from", "turn one's face away from", "abandon", and "desert." -- -- The word translated as "turn away" also has the sense of dissuading or frustrating someone in their desires. The English phrase "turning you back on someone" captures the sense very well. However, the sense of the "turn" is a violent for with the sense of "twisting."

apotheke

ἀποθήκας, [4 verses] "Barns" is apotheke, which means "any place wherein to lay up a thing", "magazine", "storehouse", "burial-place", "refuge", "anything laid by", "store," and "store of favor."   - The word translated as "barns" generally means any storage area, basically a storehouse as opposed to a storeroom, since Jesus uses another word for that idea.

apothnesko,

ἀπέθανεν [14 verses] (3rd sg aor ind act) "Dead" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."  - "They die" is a Greek verb that means "to die" and "to die off", but it's form is an infinitive "to die". This form goes with the verb "can", which really has the sense of "have the power to die".

14
ara

ἄρα  [ 5 verses ](partic) "Then" is from ara, which means "there and then", "straightway", "then", "next", "mark you!", "for this cause", "so true is it that," and "namely." -- The word translated as "wherefore" is a particle marking a sudden change or explaining or drawing attention to a consequence of an action. It is used in questions that expect a negative answer. With the objective negative, it expects a positive answer.

ἄρα γε [3 verses](adv) Untranslated is ara ge. Ara means "there and then", "straightway", "then", "next", "mark you!", "for this cause", "so true is it that," and "namely." It indicates an immediate transition. It is also used to introduce a sentence that is a question that expects a negative answer.  The ge is an emphatic particle meaning "at least" and "indeed." It emphasizes the word to which it is associated. -- The word translated as "wherefore" is a particle marking a sudden change or explaining or drawing attention to a consequence of an action. It is used in questions that expect a negative answer. With the objective negative, it expects a positive answer.

5
archaios

() "By them of old time" is archaios, which means as an adjective means "from the beginning", "from the source", "ancient", "simple", "silly", "former", "the Ancients [of people]", "anciently [adverb], and "the principle [in a loan],"

arche

ἀρχῆς [13 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Beginning" is arche, which means "beginning", "origin", "first principles", "first place of power", "empire," and "command." This is the word from which we get both "archbishop," primal bishops who can consecrate other bishops, and "archeology," the study of ancient. -- "Beginning" is a noun that means "beginning", "origin", "first principles", "first place of power", "empire," and "command." This is the word from which we get both "archbishop," primal bishops who can consecrate other bishops, and "archeology," the study of ancient history.

archiereus

ἀρχιερεῦσιν [4 verses](noun pl masc dat) "Unto the Chief priests" is archiereus, which means "arch-priest" and "chief priest."  - "Unto the chief priests" is from a word that means "arch-priest", "high priest," and "chief priest."

architriklinos

ἀρχιτρικλίνῳ: [1 verse](noun sg masc dat) "Governor/master of the feast is architriklinos, which means "president of a banquet" from a two root words that means "high seater,: from the word that means "recline" as people did at banquets. 

archomai

ἀρξαμένου [14 verses](part sg aor mid masc gen) "Had begun" "Shall ye begin" is from archomai, which is a form of archô, which means "to be first", "to begin", "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command." --  "Ye begin" is from a verb in the form of an adjective that means "to be first", "to begin," and "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command."  The two meanings, "to start" and "to command" create different meanings when paired with the following verbs.  The form is someone acting on themselves, so "make a start for yourself" or "command yourself". 

14
archon

ἄρχοντες [5 verses](noun pl masc nom) "The princes" is archon, which means "ruler", "commander", "official," and "magistrate."  - "The princes" is from the Greek word that means "ruler," and "magistrate." This is the word used in the phrase "the prince of the world" (John 12:31), who Christ castes down.

argos

ἀργὸν [3 verses](adj sg neut acc) "Idle" is argos, which means "not working the ground", "lazy," and "idle" when applied to people, but when applied to things (like words) "lying idle", "yielding no return," and "fruitless."  - "Idle" is an adjective that means "not working the ground", "lazy," and "idle" when applied to people, but when applied to things (like words) "lying idle", "yielding no return," and "fruitless."

arguros

ἄργυρον [1 verse](noun sg masc acc) "Silver" is arguros, which means "any white metal", "silver", "silver plate", "quicksilver," "silver-money," and, generally, "money." -- "Silver" is word that means any white metal or anything plated with white metal. It is also used to refer generally to money.

aristeros

ἀριστερά [3 verses[(adj sg fem nom) "The left" is from aristeros, which means "left", "on the left", "boding ill", "ominous", "awkward", "erring," and "leftward in the mind." -- -- The Greek term translated as "left hand" is not the common word usually translated as "left" but another term for "left" that has many negative connotations such as "ominous", "erring", and "awkward." The common word for left has many positive implications where this one, like "left" in Latin, has sinister implications.

ariston

ἄριστόν[2 verses] (noun sg neut acc) "Dinner" is from ariston, which originally meant "breakfast" but later meant "luncheon." -- The word translated as "dinner" means "breakfast" or "lunch."

arithmeo

ἠριθμημέναι [2 verses](part pl perf mp fem nom ) "Numbered" is arithmeo, which means "to count," and "to number," but for the tax collector it also means "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." -- "Numbered" is the Greek source of our word "arithmetic," which means "to count", "to number", "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." It is in a form which indicates that they, as the subject, are acting on themselves, so "have accounted for themselves" or "have paid for themselves."

arketos

ἀρκετὸν [ 2 verses ](adj sg neut nom) "It is enough" is arketos, which means "satisfactory", "(it is) enough," and "sufficient." It is the adjective form of arkeo-, which means "to ward off," and "to keep off" and which is used to mean "to be strong enough", "to be a match for," and "to be satisfied with." -- "Enough" is translated from a Greek word that means "sufficient."  This is the adjective form of a word that means "to ward off," and "to keep off" and which is used to mean "to be strong enough", "to be a match for," and "to be satisfied with." The form is that of a subject but one without a verb.

2
arsen

ἄρσεν [2 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Male" is arsen, which means "male", "the male sex," and "the masculine gender." It also means "mighty", "robust,"" "coarse" and "tough," which adds a little perspective to the idea. - "Male" is from a word that means "male", "the male sex," and "the masculine gender." It also means "coarse" and "tough," which adds a little perspective to the idea. It is not the word usually translated as "man" in statements such as "the Son of man," but a word Jesus only uses twice. It came from the Septuagint version of Gen 5:2.

arti

ἄρτι [13 verses](adv) "Now" is arti, which means "just", "exactly," and "just now." -- The Greek word translated as "now" means "just" or "exactly and "now" in the sense of "just now" when applied to time. Jesus usually seems to use it in the sense of "now".

13
artos

ἄρτους [32 verses](noun pl masc acc)"Bread" is artos, which means specifically a "cake of whole wheat bread," and generally "loaf," and "bread." -- The word translated as "bread" means "small loaf or cake of bread". It is more like a slice of bread today. It describes a thin 1/2 inch thick round or an oblong loaf of wheat bread, meant to be torn into pieces and not cut. It was closer to a flour tortilla or a piece of pan than a loaf of bread. "Bread" is one of Christ's most basic symbols, representing temporary physical nourishment as contrasted with permanent spiritual nourishment.

askos

ἀσκοὺς [4 verses](noun pl masc acc)  "Bottles" is askos, which means "skin", "hide", "skin made into a bag", "wineskin", "belly", "paunch," and "human skin." -- The term translated as "bottles" means "skins, and describes the leather containers, wine skins, used for wine used in Christ's time. The problem with updating the terms to bottles is that the analogy not longer works. The word also means "human skin" and is a clear metaphor for the container of philosophy: human beings.

aspasmos

ἀσπασμοὺς [4 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Greetings" is aspasmos, which means "greeting", "embrace," and "affection."  - The Greek word translated as "greeting," means "greeting," "embrace," and "affection."

4
aspazomai

ἀσπάσησθε [3 verses](2nd pl aor subj mp) "Ye salute" is aspazomai, which means "to welcome kindly", "to greet", "to be glad", "to kiss", "to embrace", "to cling fondly to", "to draw to one's self", "to follow eagerly [of things]", "to cleave to [of things], "to receive with joy," and "to salute [from a distance]." -- The word translated as "salute" it is translated as "greet" in most other Bible translated, but the idea is more enthusiastic that that. The word means "draw to yourself." It is used mostly to describe greeting, including the embracing and kissing of a greeting, but it also describe clinging to, and saying goodbye, where there can be embraces as well. It is in the form of either a statement or a command/request.

assarion

ἀσσαρίου [3 verses](noun sg neut gen ) "Farthing""Farthing" is assarion, which was one-tenth of a drachma, which was the standard silver coin of Greece. This was a medium sized coin, like our nickel or dime. -- "For a farthing" is the name of a coin of medium value, one that was worth one-tenth of the standard coin (drachma) used in the Greek world but four times more than the smallest coin. It is in the possessive case, which is the source of the "for."

aster

ἀστέρες [2 verses](noun pl masc nom) "Stars" is aster, which means "star", "shooting star," and "meteor" and is used lyrically to refer to flame, light, and fire. It was also used, as in English, to refer to "illustrious" people.

2
astrape

ἀστραπὴ [4 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Lightning" is from astrapê, which means "a flash of lightning", "lightning," and the "light of a lamp. " It is a metaphor for the "flashing" of the eyes. -- This word is translated in the Bible as lightning three out of four times it appears, but the description of it rising and setting in Matthew 24:27 makes it seem like Jesus uses it to describe the shining of the sun.

4
asynetos

ἀσύνετοί [2 verse](adj pl masc nom) "Without understanding" is from the Greek, asynetos, which means "stupid" "witless," "void of understanding", "witless", "not able to understand," and, in the passive, "not to be understood, and "unintelligible." Literally, "not" , that is, "intelligence" or "wise."   - "Without understanding" is from a Greek adjective that means "stupid" and "witless," literally "not intelligent." It is from a base word that indicates the ability to put things "together."

atheteo

() "Reject" is atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to "break faith with."

atimazo

ἀτιμάσαντες[2 verses]( part pl aor act masc nom ) "Entreated ...shamefully" is from atimazo, which means "to hold in no honor", "to esteem lightly", "to treat as unworthy," and "to bring dishonor upon." -- "Entreated...shamefully" is an uncommon verb which means "to hold in no honor", "to esteem lightly", "to treat as unworthy," and "to bring dishonor upon."  It is in the form of an adjective as well, "dishonoring".

atimos

ἄτιμος [2 verses](adj sg masc nom) "Without honor" is atimos, which means "dishonored", "unhonored", "not deemed worthy", "deprived of civic rights", "unavenged", "unpunished," and "without value." It is the negative of timos which means having a set value.  - "Without honor" is a Greek word that means, literally, "not valuable" and means "dishonored", "not honored", "not deemed worthy", "deprived of civic rights", "unavenged", "unpunished," and "without value."

auleo

Ηὐλήσαμεν [2 verses](1st pl aor ind act) "We have piped" is from auleo, which means to "play on the flute", "fill with music", "play to (persons)," generally, "play," and, in the passive, "be played to," and "hear music."  - "We have piped" is a word that means specifically to "play on the flute," and generally, "play music." It is in a tense that indicates something happening at a specific point in time.

aurion

αὔριον [6 verses](adv) "To morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow," "tomorrow at this time", and, as an adverb, "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly." -- The term translated as "the morrow," may be the closest Greek comes to "tomorrow," but the form is an adverb. However, it is introduced by an article ("the") which allows it to act like a noun. The word is an adverb meaning something more like "until tomorrow", "until the morning" meaning "shortly" or "presently." Unlike the noun "tomorrow" in English, this adverb doesn't take in the entire future like we use "tomorrow" to mean "the future". This Greek word always communicates the idea of "in a short time." The term indicates not now but the immediate future.se

autos

αὐτοῦ [720 verses](adj sg masc gen) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

721
auxano

αὐξηθῇ [6 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "It is grown"  is auxano, which means to "increase", "increase in power", "strengthen", "exalt by one's deeds", "glorify", "exalt by one's deeds", "glorify", "amplify", "exaggerate", "bring up," and "sacrifice." In the passive, it means "grow," and "increase" is size, strength, or power. -- "It is grown" is from a passive form of a Greek verb that means "to grow large", "to increase in power," and "to grow up."

axios

ἀξία, [12 verses](adj sg fem nom) "Worth" is axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved." -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. 

12
ballo

ἔβαλον. [54 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Cast" is ballo, which means "to throw", "to let fall," "to cast," "to put", "to pour", "to place money on deposit", "push forward or in front [of animals]", "to shed", "to place", "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky", "to fall", "to lay as foundation", "to begin to form", "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe." -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. In dice, it means "to throw" the dice, but with the sense of being lucky.

baptisma

βάπτισμα [6 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc) "Baptism" is baptisma, which is only in the New Testament and means "baptism. - - The Greek noun for "baptism" appears for the first time in the NT. However, it comes from a Greek verb that means to "dip" or "to plunge" and was used for many different ideas ranging a town being "flooded to a person being "drown" and from someone being "over their heads" in debt to "getting in deep water."

baptistes

βαπτιστοῦ: [3 verses](noun sg masc gen) "The baptist" is from baptistes, which means "one who dips," and "baptizer."  - - "The Baptist" is a noun that means "one who dips." In English, we would say "the Dipper" or "the Dunker."

baptizo

ἐβάπτισεν [8 verses] ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "baptized" is baptizo, which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."   - The Greek word translated as "baptize" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." It is in the form of an adjective, baptizing."

8
Barachias

Βαραχίου, [1 verse](noun sg masc gen) "Barachias" is Barachias, which is the Greek form of the Hebrew name "Berechiah."

1
bareos

βαρέως [1 verse] (adv) "Dull" is from bareos, which as an adverb means "impatiently", "slowly", "with dignity", "(of hearing) with disgust," "heavily", "pressed down", "with difficulty," and "weighed down;" as an adjective, not the form here, it means "heavy in weight", "heavy with age", "infirmity or suffering", "heavy to bear", "grievous", "burdensome", "grievous", "oppressive," causing disgust", "indigestible", "violent", "weighty", "grave", "ample", "of persons", "severe", "stern", "wearisome", "troublesome", "overbearing", "important", "powerful", "difficult," of soldiers "heavy-armed," of sound, "strong, deep, bass," of musical pitch, "low," of speech, "unaccented," and of smell, "strong, offensive." - "Dull" is from an adjective/adverb which means generally as an adjective "heavy (in many forms)" and, as an adverb "heavily," but with many, many specific uses. Here it is in the form of a adverb and has a specific meaning of "with disgust" when applied to listening.

baros

βάρος [1 verse](noun sg neut acc) "The burden" is baros, which means "weight", "heaviness", "burden," and, in a positive sense, "abundance."   - "Burden" is from an adjective that means "weight", "heaviness", "burden," and, in a positive sense, "abundance." Here, it has the sense of the greater part, what the Greeks would call "the weight" of something.

barys

βαρέα [2 verses]] (adj pl neut nom) "Heavy" is barys, which means "heavy in weight", "heavy of strength and force", "heavy with age, infirmity or suffering", "pregnant", "heavy, slow", "heavy to bear", "grievous", "burdensome," "oppressive", "causing disgust", "unwholesome," of persons, "severe", "stern", "wearisome", "troublesome", "overbearing," of sound, "strong", "deep", "bass," of smell, "strong," and "offensive."  - The Greek word translated as "heavy" (used by Jesus in two verses) means "heavy in weight", "heavy with age, infirmity or suffering", "grievous", "oppressive", "causing disgust," and many other negative ideas. This negativity comes from the idea that negative things fall to earth and positive ones fly to the heavens. Its only positive meaning is "pregnant."

2
basanistes

βασανισταῖς [1 verse](noun pl masc dat) "Tormentors" is from basanistes, which means "examiner", "questioner", "torturer", "jailer," and "one who tests."  - The word translated as "tormentors" means "examiners," "testers," or "questioners" but the idea was the questioning was done using various motivating techniques to get people to talk.

basileia

βασιλείᾳ [98 verses](noun sg fem dat) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

basileus

βασιλεῖ [27 verses](noun sg masc dat) "King" is basileus, which means a "king", "chief", "prince", "lord", "master", "a great man," and "the first and most distinguished of any class." It is a form of the word used for "kingdom." -- "King" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

basilissa

βασίλισσα [2 verses](noun sg fem nom) "The queen" is basilissa, which means "queen", "empress," and "wife of the ruler." It is the female form of basileus, which means a "king", "chief", "prince", "lord", "master", "a great man," and "the first and most distinguished of any class." It is a form of the world used for "kingdom."  - "The queen" is from is the female form of Greek word that means "king" or "ruler," so means "queen", "empress," and "wife of the ruler."

bastazo

βαστάσασι [6 verses](part pl aor act masc dat) "Have born the burden" is bastazo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to bear", "to carry", "to endure," and "to carry off, "produce", "yield," of land."  - "Which have born" is from a verb that means to "lift up" "raise", "endure," and "bear." Jesus only uses it six times, always in the sense of taking up a heavy responsibility.

bathos

βάθος [3 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Deepness" is bathos, which means "height" or "depth" measuring up or down. In Greek, it was also used as a metaphor (as it is in English) for depth of mind, e.g. "He is deep."  - "Deepness" is a Greek noun that means "height" or "depth" measuring up or down. In Greek, it was also used as a metaphor (as it is in English) for depth of mind, e.g. "He is deep." The exact phrase here is "no seeming depthwhich we would describe in English as "shallowness."

battalogeo

βατταλογήσητε [unique](verb 2nd pl aor subj act)"Use vain repetitions" is battalogeo, which means "to speak stammeringly", "to say the same thing over and over again," and "to prattle." -- The Greek word that gets translated as "use vain repetitions" means "to stammer" or "to repeat the same words over and over." is an inherently humorous word about words. It ends with "logeo," a form of logos, which is usually translated in the KJV as "word It is made from the name of either a famous stammer, Battos, the king of Cyrene, or a wordy and boring poet, Battus. It means "saying the same thing over and over."

bdelygma

βδέλυγμα  [2 verses]( noun sg neut acc ) (noun sg neut acc)"Abomination" is bdelygma, which means "abomination," but this word appears only in the NT. A related word, bdelugmia, means "sickness", "nausea," "filth," and "nastiness." The verb form, bdelussomai, means "to feel loathing for food", "to make stink," and "to make loathsome." The most common word of this base is the adjective, bdeluros, which means "disgusting" and "loathsome." In the source reference, Dan 12:11, the Hebrew word is shiqquwts, which means "detestable things", "idol", "impure clothing," and "flesh of victims." The root, shaqats, means "to contaminate," and "to pollute." - "Abomination" is translated from a Greek word appears first in Septuagint, the Greek OT, but it doesn't appear elsewhere in Greek writings, except, of course, in the NT and religious writing after Christ. It is translated consistently as "abomination," but a related noun means "sickness", "nausea," "filth," and "nastiness." The verb form means "to feel loathing for food", "to make a stink," and "to make loathsome." The most common word of this root word is the adjective that means "disgusting" and "loathsome." In the source reference, Dan 12:11, the Hebrew word means "detestable things", "idol", "impure clothing," and "flesh of victims." The root means "to contaminate," and "to pollute."

2
bebeloo

βεβηλοῦσιν[1 verse] (3rd pl pres ind act ) "Profane" is from bebêloô, which means "to profane", "to pollute" and "to defile" especially meant to refer to the Sabbath.  - "Profane" is a verb means "to pollute" and "to defile" especially meant to refer to the Sabbath. It is in the present tense. 

Beelzeboul

Βεεζεβοὺλ [4 verses](noun masc sg) "Beelzebub" is from the Greek Beelzeboul, which has no Greek meaning because it is from the Hebrew ba‘al zbûb, which means "Lord [of the] Flies" which is a mockery of the Hebrew ba‘al zbûl, "Lord Prince." Ba'al, of course, was one of the pagan gods mentioned often in the Old Testament, but the word means simple "Lord". - Jesus refers to the personalization of evil with the term "Beelzebub"It is not based upon any Greek word. The word "Ba'al Zebub" ("Lord of the Flies" or "Lord of the Flyers") is a Hebrew pun on "Ba'al Zebul" meaning "Lord of the Manor". Christ refers to this pun in Matthew 10:25 using the Greek word "master of the estate" to introduce it. However, in Matthew 12:27, Christ uses this term to refer to the refer to the controller of demons. For more information, see this article.

biazo

βιάζεται, [2 verses](3rd sg pres ind mp) "Suffereth violence" is from biazo, which means to "constrain", "be hard pressed or overpowered", "be forced or constrained to do", "forcibly made slaves." " make good", "suffice to discharge (a debt)", "carry by force", "act with violence, " "use force," and "contend or argue vehemently."  - "Suffers violence" is a verb that means "to constrain", "to force," and "to use violence." However, it not a true passive, but in the form where the subject is acted upon by or for itself. This is an uncommon word for Christ to use, so it stands about a chosen specifically to make his point. 

bibiastes

βιασταὶ [1 verse](noun pl masc nom ) "The violent" is from biastes, which means "forceful", "one who uses force", "a violent man," and "mighty."  - "The violent" it is a Greek noun that means "forceful" and "mighty." It is a form which indicates that it is the indirect object of the verb. This noun and the previous verb are different forms of the same word. In English, only the word "force" works in a similar way. This is also an uncommon word for Christ to use. The word is plural so was add a "the" in front of it to indicate we mean a group of people. We could also say "violent ones" to capture the same idea. 

blasphemeo

βλασφημήσωσιν: [4 verses]( verb 3rd pl aor subj act) "Blaspheme" is blasphemeo, which means "to speak profanely of sacred things", "to offer rash prayers", "to speak ill of", "to slander," and, since the NT, "to speak irreverently of God." -- "Blaspheme" is the verb from the same root as above. It  means "to speak profanely of sacred things", "to offer rash prayers", "to speak ill of", "to slander," and, since the NT, "to speak irreverently of God."

blasphemia

βλασφημία [4 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Blasphemy" is from blasphemia, which means "slander", "profane speech", "word of evil omen," and "irreverent speech against God." - (UW) This word means "word of evil omen", "profane speech", "slander", "defamation," and "abuse." Our word "blasphemy" comes directly from the Greek word, via the Bible. So our word came to mean specifically "slander against God." This word is only used twice in the Greek OT, to translate different Greek words, one is the Hebrew phrase that means "speak amiss error" and the other a Hebrew word that means "contempt."

blastano

ἐβλάστησεν [2 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Sprung up" is from blastano, which means "to sprout", "to bud," and "to grow." It is a metaphor for "to come to light", "to shoot forth," and "to be born." - - "Blades" is from a noun which means "an enclosed place", "pastures", "herbage", "growing crops," and "growing grass."

blepo

βλέπετε: [46 verses](2nd pl imperf ind act) "Seeth" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." -- The verb translated as "see ye" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding so  "watch" works better.  "Look" does not work as well because it doesn't take a direct object and this word does.

bothunos

βόθυνον, [3 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Pit" is from bothunos, which means "pit" and "well." It is a version of bathuno, which means "to make deep", "deep," and, interestingly, "poverty."  - "Pit" is a word that means "pit" or "well." It is a verb that means "to make deep", "deep," and, interestingly, "poverty." Its use here seems to indicate a "wallow" or "pond."

boulomai

βούληται [3 verses](3rd sg pres subj mp} "Will" is boulomai, which isn't the word that indicates a future action as in English. It means "to will", "to wish," and "to prefer." Here, it might be best translated as "chooses to."  - "Will" is from a Greek verb that doesn't indicate a future action as in English. It means "to will", "to wish," and "to prefer." It is in the form where the subject (Christ) act on himself.

bous

[uncommon](noun sg masc acc) "Ox" is bous, which means " bullock", "bull", "ox", metaph. of any "dam" or "mother". -- The word translated as "ox" means "bull" or "ox". It is an uncommon word. 

brecho

βρέχει[ [3 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Sends rain" is brecho, which means "to wet", "to moisten", "to shower [with wealth]", "to bath [in sweat]", "to get drunk", "to rain", "to send rain," and "to be filled with water." -- The Greek word translated on "sendeth the rain" means "to moisten" and "to wet," but it has a lot of additional meanings including "to bath in sweat", "to shower", and "to get drunk." Ir doesn't have any direct connection to teh word rain" in the same way we use "shower on" to mean "rain on". However, this sense also has a specific sense of "showing with wealth." This is the verb from of the Greek word that means "rain" and "irrigation" and other ideas of moistening.

broche

βροχὴ [2 verses](noun sg fem nom) ""Rain" is from broche, which means "rain" "moistening", "steeping (in brewing)", "inundation (of the Nile)," and "irrigation." The verb form is brecho. -- The word translated as "rain" primarily means "rain" but it also has the sense of irrigation flooding.

brosis

βρῶσις [6 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Meat" is from brosis, which means "meat", "pasture", "eating, "taste," and "flavor." The Greek word used for "rust" in the NT and the Septuagint OT is ios. The Greek word used in ancient classical Greek (Homer et al) for "rust" is aza, which means "dry patch". The modern Greek word is skouria. -- Only in Matthew 6:19 of the NT is it translated as "corrosion", "rust, or "decay," nowhere else in Greek literature. The Greek word, ios, means "rust" (and "poison") in ancient Greek and it is translated as "rust" in James 5:3 and in the Greek Septuagint, for example, Ezekiel 24:6. This word is first used in the Greek OT in Genesis 25:28  where it clearly means "food" and "eating."

brugmos

βρυγμὸς [7 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Gnashing" is brugmos, which means "biting", "gobbling," and "chattering."  - The word translated as "gnashing" which primarily means "biting." However, the noun form is very formal, like "gnashery."

brugmos

βρυγμὸς[6 verses] (noun sg masc nom) "Gnashing" is brugmos, which means "biting", "gobbling," and "chattering."  - The word translated as "gnashing" which primarily means "biting."

6
chairo

χαίρει [14 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "He rejoiceth" is chairo which means "rejoice", "take pleasure in," and "welcome."  -- The Greek verb translated as "rejoice" means "rejoice", "take pleasure in," and "welcome."

chalkos

χαλκὸν [1 verse](noun sg fem acc) "Brass" is chalkos, which means "copper", "bronze", "anything made of metal (esp. of arms)", "vessels of copper", "cauldron", "urn", "copper money", "bronze plate" and "tablet." -- "Brass" is a word that means either copper or bronze, or generally, anything made of metal, specifically weapons.

chara

χαρᾶς (noun sg fem gen) "Joy" is chara, which means "joy" and "delight." -- "Joy" is from a worth that means "joy" and "delight." More about Christ's use of emotions in this article.

charis

[uncommon](noun sg fem nom) "Thank" is charis, which means, in objective sense, "outward grace" or "favour", "beauty", in subjective sense, "grace" or "favour felt",  "kindness", "goodwill", in concrete sense, a "favour" done or returned, "boon", "gratification", "delight",  with many special uses. -- The Greek word translated as "thank" is complicated. It means the appearance of beauty and grace. On the part of a doer, it is "kindness" and "goodwill". On the part of the receiver, it means "thankfulness" and "gratitude". Generally, it means gratification", "delight",  with many special uses. It is the subject of this phrase. It also means "the owed gratitude" and "to be beholden". 

cheilos

χείλεσίν [2 verses](noun pl neut dat) "Lips" is cheilos, which means a "lip," for birds, "bill", "beak," and is a metaph. the "edge", "brink," and "rim."  -  - "Lips" is a single word meaning "lips," "bills" or "beaks" for birds, and  is a metaphor for "edge."

cheimon

χειμών, [3 verses](noun sg masc nom) "It will be foul weather" is cheimon, which means "winter", "wintery", "storm", "stormy" and it is a metaphor for a calamity sent by the gods.  - "It will be foul weather" is not a phrase, but a single noun that means primarily "winter" but also "wintry, stormy weather." It is a metaphor for a calamity sent by the gods.

3
cheir

χείρ [25 verses] ( noun sg fem nom ) "Hand" is cheir,which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful." -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

cheiron

χεῖρον [4 verses](adj sg neut nom/acc comp) "Worse" is cheiron, which means (of persons) "meaner", "inferior," (in moral sense) "worse than others", "worse (in quality)", "inferior," and, as a noun, "inferiority." -- The terms translated as "worse" means various forms of inferiority and degradation.

chera

χηρῶν [9 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Widows" is from chera, which means "widow" and "bereaved." -- "Widows" is an adjective that means "widowed" or more generally, "bereaved".  Christ uses it as a noun. 

9
chiton

() "Coat" is chiton, which means "the garment worn next to the skin", "tunic [a men's]", "a coating", "a covering", "a membrane [anatomical]", "the upper part of a show", "vesture," and "coat of mail." -- "Coats" is the Greek word means an undergarment, not an over garment. Christ is literally saying, "Don't take two pairs of underwear." There is a certain humor in this that seems intentional.

choiros

χοίρων, [3 verses](noun pl masc/fem gen ) "Swine" is choiros, which means "sow", "young pig", "porker", "swine," and slang for the female sex organ.  - The Greek word translated as "swine" primarily means "sow," but it was also used as a Greek slang term for the female sexual parts. Of course, the pigs was an unclean animal among the Jews and we may assume was used by them as a derogatory term. It is introduced by an article so "the sows".

chôlos

χωλοὶ [6 verses](adj pl masc nom) "The lame" is from chôlos, which means "lame", "limping," and "defective." A very similar word, cholos, which means "gall", "bitter", "angry," and "wrathful." - "The lame" is a word that means both "limping" and 'defective."

choreo

χωρεῖ [4 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Goeth" is from choreo, which means "to leave room for another", "to make way", "to withdraw", "to go forward", "to make progress", "to advance", "to proceed," [of money] "to be spent", "to have room for", "to hold", "to contain," and "to be capable of."  - - (WW) "Goeth" is from a Greek verb that has three meanings 1) having the capacity for something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. "Receive" is from a Greek verb that has three meanings 1) having the capacity for something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. It is only used four times. Here, in the next verse, in Matthew 15:17, where it refers to food in the belly, and John 8:37, where it also refers to something sitting within you. So the negative sense is similar to how we say, you can't "stomach" or "digest" something. Or it "doesn't sit well." So it has a humorous feeling.

chorizo

χωριζέτω [2 verses](verb 3rd sg pres imperat act) "Put asunder" is chorizo which means "separate", "divide", "exclude", "separate in thought", "distinguish," and, in the passive, "to be separated", "severed", "divided", "to be different", "depart," and "to go away.  - The word translated as "put asunder" means to physically "separate," or "divide," but is also means to "separate in thought," and "distinguish." Jesus only uses this word here and in the parallel verse in Mark. Everywhere else he uses another word to mean "divide" in the sense of severing. We assume this is because of the "separate in thought" meaning.

chortazo

() "Filled" is chortazo, which means "feed", "feast", "fatten" and "to eat their fill." It is a term most commonly used for cattle.

chortos

χόρτον [4 verses] (noun sg masc acc) "Grass" is chortos, which means "an enclosed place", "pastures", "herbage", "growing crops", "any feeding-ground," "green crop", "the expanse [of heaven]", "fodder", "provender", "food generally", "farmyard," and "growing grass."  - - The verse starts with the term translated as "grasses" means "an enclosed place" with the sense of a feedlot. It means food generally, as well, specifically various forms of animal fodder. It is also used to describe the "expanse" of heaven as we might say, "the pastures of heaven."

chreia

χρείαν [13 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Need of" is  chreia, which means "need", "want", "poverty", "a request of a necessity", "business", "military service", "a business affair", "employment", "familiarity", "intimacy," and "maxim." -- The word translated as "need" means "need" and "poverty," but it also means "familiarity" and "intimacy."

chrestos

χρηστὸς [3 verses](adj sg masc nom) "Easy" is chrestos, which means "good", "useful", "good of its kind," and "serviceable;" of persons, "good", "kindly;" "honest", "worthy," in war, "valiant", "true;" of the gods, "propitious", "merciful", "bestowing health or wealth;" of a man, "strong", "able in body for sexual intercourse;" when used as a noun, "benefits", "kindnesses", "happy event", "prosperity," and "success.;" in a moral sense, it is the opposite of kakos, which means "bad" and "evil," but which is not the word usually translated as "evil" in the NT. For more on this topic, see this article. The word translated as "easy" actually means "good" in many different senses of the word. In a moral sense, it is the opposite of the Greek word that really means "bad" and "evil," but which is not the word usually translated as "evil" in the NT. For more on this topic, see this article.

chrezo

χρῄζετε [3 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Have need" is from chrezo, which means "want", "lack", "have need of", "desire", "long for", "crave", "if one will", "if one chooses," and, as an adjective, "needy," and "poor."  - The verb translated as "need" means "want", "lack", "have need of", and "desire". Again, it is in the present tense. Notice how its meaning overlaps with the earlier verb translated as "seek after". The KJV doesn't reflect this, but it seems important. Both "need" and "want" combine its sense of a lack and a desire.

christos

χριστοῦ; [15 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Christ" is christos, which means "to be rubbed with salve", "used as an ointment," and, of persons, "anointed." -- (UW) The word translated as "Christ" means "anointed." Our word is basically the English form of the Greek word, not a translation. In the NT, it is understood to mean the Messiah, following the anointing of the kings of Israel. The Jews of Jesus's era thought they understood who the Messiah was and the source of his authority. He was a descendant of David, and his authority came from David as "the anointed" king of the Jews.

15
chronizo

Χρονίζει [3 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Delayeth" is from chronizo, which means "to spend time", "last", "continue", "to take time," and "to linger."  - "Delayeth" is from a verb that means "to spend time", "last", "continue", "to take time," and "to linger." It is very close to how we say, "talking his time." It is an uncommon word, used only here and later in Matthew 25:5.

3
chronos

() "While" is chronos, which means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age", "season", "delay," and "tense."

chrusos

χρυσὸν [3 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Gold" is chrysos, which means "gold", "things made of gold (including stamped coins)." and "anything dear or precious." -- "Gold" is a word that means things made of gold and, poetically, anything precious to a person, including stamped coins.

Dabid

Δαυεὶδ [5 verses] (Hebrew name) "David" is from is from the Greek Dabid, which is the Greek form of the Hebrew name. -- "David" is from the Greek spelling of the Hebrew name.

5
daimonion

δαιμόνια [13 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Devils" is daimonion, which means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit." Technically, it means "belonging to a demon. "Evil spirit" is a New Testament usage or interpretation. " It is from daimôn, which actually is the noun "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil" (though it seems the way the Jews used it here), but in Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player." --  "Devil" is a word which means "belonging to a demon." It is based on the noun for "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil". In Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player." See this article on "demon" and related terms such as "devil". Generally, "having a demon" was how people of Christ's time said that someone had mental problems. See this article on demons and mental illness. 

13
daktylos

δακτύλῳ [5 verses]] (noun sg masc dat) "fingers" is daktylos, which means "finger", "thumb", "toes," a measure of length, "finger's breadth," "date," and "a kind of grape."  - "Finger" is from another uncommon Greek word for Jesus, used only in five verses that means "fingers", "toes", "the thumb" "an inch," and "a digit." It is used in the same sense that we might say, "keeping someone under your thumb." Since the term also means "toes", under someone's foot also works best.

5
daneion

δάνιον [1 verse](noun sg neut nom/acc) "The debt" is daneion, which means "loan."

daneizo

δανίσασθαι [3 verses](verb aor inf mid) "Borrow" is daneizo, which means "to put out to usury", "to let out", "to borrow," and "to have lent out to one." -- The word translated as "borrow" is a little more specific than the English word, referring specifically to the lending and borrowing of money.

3
Daniel

Δανιὴλ [4 verses](Hebrew name) "Daniel" is from Daniel, the Hebrew name of the Jewish prophet. -- This is from the Greek spelling of the Hebrew name of Daniel.

3
Daueid

Δαυεὶδ [6 verses](Hebrew Name) "David" is from is from the Greek Daueid, which is the Greek form of the Hebrew name. -- This is the Greek spelling of the name of the Judaic king.

6
de

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It also an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

446
de

δὴ [1 verse](partic) "Also" is from a Greek particle de, which is used to give greater exactness, after adjectives: "quite", "all", "full", "only", " after adverbs quite: "very", "verily", "surely," with verbs, "verily," with pronouns to mark them strongly, "like", "of all persons", "be they who they may", "one or other," to continue a narrative, "so then", "so," to express what is unexpected, "then," with imperative and subjunctive "but", after the conjunction "and: ""what is more," and "above all."

1
dechomai

δεχόμενος [18 verses](part sg pres mp masc nom) "They may receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. -- "Receive" is a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality.

18
dei

ἔδει [28 verses](verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "Must" is dei, which means "needful," and "there is need." -- The Greek verb translated as "ye ought" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular, 3rd person. It can also mean "to lack." It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed. So there is no "you" in this verb, just necessity itself.

28
deilos

() "Fearful" is deilos, which means "cowardly" "vile," "worthless," "lowborn", "mean", "miserable," and "wretched." -- The word translated as "fearful" means "cowardly" but has a lot of meanings, both critical and sympathetic, relating to being "lowborn" and "wretched."

deipnon

δείπνοις [7 verses] (noun pl masc dat) "Supper" is from deipnon, which means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food." -- "Feasts" is from a word that means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food."

7
deka

δέκα [11 verses](numeral ) "Ten" is from deka, which means the number ten. -- "Ten" is the Greek word for the numeral "ten".

11
denarion

δηνάρια, [8 verses]( noun pl neut acc) "Penny" is from denarion, which was the principle silver coin of the Roman Empire in NT times. -- "Penny is from the Greek word for a denarius, which was a coin of silver, which had the purchasing power of about $70-$80 today (though comparisons are obviously not very meaningful). It was the standard wage for a day's labor by a general laborer, which for most of human history was an agricultural worker. To offer and agree to work for this wage would be considered the expected practice for hundreds of years around the birth of Christ in the Roman Empire.

dendron

δένδρον [9 verses](noun sg neut nom) "Tree" is dendron (more commonly spelled dendreon), which means "tree", "fruit-tree", "tall plants (such as rattan)" "stick," and "timber." -- The word for "tree" most commonly means fruit bearing trees. The tree was a symbol for the naturally productive assets of nature as opposed to fields which must be planted each year.

deo

δήσῃ [10 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Bind" is deo which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " -- "Bind" is  a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. "

deomai

δεήθητε [4 verses] (verb 2nd pl aor subj/ind pass) "Pray" is from deomaiwhich means to "lack", "miss", "stand in need of", "want",  "to be in want or need", "require", and to "beg a thing from".   (WW) The Greek word translated as "pray" is means to "lack", "miss", "stand in need of", "want",  "to be in want or need", "require", and to "beg a thing from".  It is an uncommon word for Jesus. It is not a command, as translated, but a passive verb, "you might be wanting". 

dero

(verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be beaten" is from dero, which means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." -- The Greek verb translated as "shall be beaten" means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." Jesus seems to use it to mean being "flogged". 

desme

δέσμας [1 verse]((noun pl fem acc) "Bundles" is from desme, which means "package", "bundle", "handfuls," and was an Egyptian "measure."  - The word translated as "bundles" also means "packages" and "handfuls."

desmeuo

δεσμεύουσιν [1 verse] (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "They bind" is from desmeuo, which means "fetter", "put in chains", "tie together", "to lay snares for," and "bind fast to."  - "Bind" is from a Greek word that means "to fetter", "to put in chains", "to tie together," and "to lay snares for."  Jesus only uses it once. It is not the common word translated as "bind" and used by Jesus ten times.

1
deuro

δεῦρο [4 verses](adv) "Come" is deuro, which is an adverb that means "hither", "hear", "until now", "hither to," and [with an imperative] "come on" and [later] "go away."  - "Come" is from an adverb that means "here" but can be used in an expression to mean "come on."

deute

Δεῦτε [8 verses](adv) "Come" is from deute, which is an adverb that means "come here" and "come hither," like we might shout "Here!" in English.  It is not a verb so it doesn't contain the regular information about the subject found in a Greek verb.  - "Come" is not from a verb but from an adverb used like saying "over here!" in English to call someone to where you are.

deuteros

δευτέρῳ [5 verses](adj sg masc dat) "To the second" is deuteros, which means "second", "next", "second of two," and "later." - The word translated as "second"  means "second", "next", "second of two," and "later."

dexia

δεξιά [1 verse](noun sg fem nom) "Right" is dexia, which means "the right hand". It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty."  This is a noun form of the adjective "right", dexios. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below. = - (MW) The word translated as "right" actually means "right hand." It is not the adjective "right" that we saw in the previous verse, but the noun, "right hand." It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty." Unlike the word below, it only refers to the hand not to the hand and forearm. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below.

dexios

δεξιά [13 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Right" is from dexios, which means, as an adjective, "on the right hand", "fortunate", "skillful", "ready", "clever", "courteous," and "kindly." As a noun, it means the "right hand," "assurance", "pledge,"and "treaty."   --  The Greek term translated as "right hand" as a noun, it means the "right hand," "assurance", and "pledge," and as an adjective means "on the right hand", "fortunate", "skillful", "ready", "clever", "courteous," and "kindly."

dia

διὰ  [88 verses](prep) "Through" is dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "for (causal)", "among," and "between." With the accusative, it can also be "thanks to," "because of,"  "by reasons of," and "for the sake of." --  The preposition translated as "through" means "through," "in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." It indicates movement through a place or time, but it also means "by" the sense of "by means of" a given method.

88
diabolos

διάβολος [4 verses] (adj sg masc nom)"devil" is diabolos, which means "slanderous", "backbiting," and "slanderer." -- The term translated as "the devil" is another adjective, that means "to slander." Introduced by an article ("the") it becomes a noun and means "the slanderer" and "the backbiter" in Greek. Christ uses it to describe someone who degrade other people primarily by lying about them.

diakoneo

διακονηθῆναι [12 verses](verb aor inf pass) "To be ministered unto" is from diakoneo, which "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." -- The Greek verb translated as "serve" means "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." It is usually translated as "minister". It is from the same root as the Greek word usually translated as "minister".

diakonos

διάκονος. [6 verses](noun sg masc nom)"Servants" is the noun diakonos, which means "servant", "messenger," and "attendant." This is the source for our word "deacon." -- The word translated here as "servants," actually means "servant." It is not the Greek word usually translated as "servant," which really means "slave."

6
diakrino

διακρίνειν, [3 verses](verb pres inf act) "Discern" is diakrino, which means "to separate," "to separate one from another," "to discriminate", "to distinguish", "to decide," and "to separate into elemental parts." It captures the idea of telling one thing from another. It also means "to question" or "to doubt." In the Gospels, it is most often translated as "doubt" and second most often translated as "judge."  - "Discern" is from a verb that means "to separate", "to discriminate", "to distinguish," and "to decide." It captures the idea of telling one thing from another. It also means "to question" or "to doubt." In the Gospels, it is most often translated as "doubt" and second most often translated as "judge." Jesus only uses this word three times.

diallasso

διαλλάγηθι [1 verse] (2nd sg aor, imper, passive, ) "Be reconciled" is from diallasso, which means "to change", "to change someone's mind," and "to renew a friendship." It is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." And from the verb allasso, which means "change." "alter", "give in exchange", "barter", "repay," or "requite". This word appears in Greek Septuagint versions of 1Samuel 29:4, but it doesn't appear in the Strong's, which probably means it appears nowhere else in the Bible. From the Hebrew word ratsah,  using the Hithpael stem, with is used like the middle voice in Greek to show action on oneself, "to make yourself pleasing". Though ratsah, appears dozens of times in the OT, this is the only time it seems to appear in the Hithpael form. The form here is not middle, but passive.

dialogismos

διαλογισμοὶ [3 verses](noun pl masc nom) "Thoughts" is dialogismos, which means "balancing of accounts", "calculation," "consideration," "debate", "argument," and "discussion." It can also mean and it is the term for a "circuit court" and a "judicial inquiry." It isn't usually translated as "thought."  - "Thoughts" is a noun that means "balancing of accounts", "debate", "argument," and "discussion." It can also mean "balancing of accounts", "calculation," and it is the term for a "circuit court." It isn't usually translated as "thought."

dialogizomai

διαλογίζεσθε [7 verses](verb 2nd pl pres/imperf ind mp) "Reason ye" is dialogizomai, which means "to calculate exactly", "to add up account", "to debate," and "to argue."  - "Reason" is from a Greek verb that means "to calculate exactly", "to add up account", "to debate," and "to argue."

dianoia

διανοίᾳ [2 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Mind" is dianoia, which means "thought", "intention", "purpose", "notion", "process of thinking", "thinking faculty," intelligence", "understanding", "thoughts expressed," and "meaning."  - -- "Mind" is from a word Jesus rarely uses. It means "thought", "intention", "purpose,"and "meaning."

2
diaphero

διαφέρετε [5 verses](2nd pl pres ind act) "Are...better than" is diaphero, which means to "carry over or across", "carry from one to another", "go through life [of Time]", "bear through", "bear to the end", "go through with", "carry different ways", "differ", "to be different," "spread...fame abroad", "tear asunder", "defer or reserve for judgment", "differ", "make the difference", "to be of importance", "have an interest at stake," "prevail", "quarrel", "struggle", "come between", and "intervene."   - - The Greek verb translated as "better" with the "are" above is another of those words that has a lot of meanings in Greek. It  means "to carry over", "to be different from," and "to quarrel." The root word means "bring" or "carry." The meaning "to be different" takes the genitive object that we see when Jesus uses it. Jesus always uses this to compare people to some animal.  It is often translated as "better," from it sense of "prevail" and "be important."

diaskorpizo

διεσκόρπισεν [6 verses] (verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Scattered" is from diaskorpizo, which means literally, to "scatter among" or "disperse among", and "to scatter abroad". In the passive, it means "to squander", "to confound," and "to winnow." -- The word used for "Scattered" means "to scatter among", "to disperse among" and "to winnow," which is separating the wheat from the straw.  It is often used as the opposite of "gathered". 

diastrepho

διεστραμμένη, [2 verses](part sg perf mp fem voc/nom) "Perverse" is diastrephô, which means "turn different ways", "twist about", "turn aside", "divert," and metaphorically, "distort," and "pervert."  - "Perverse" is from a Greek verb (used in the form of an adjective) meaning "turn different ways," and "twist about," and metaphorically meant "to distort," and "to pervert." It has the same sense as the English "twisted."

dichazo

διχάσαι [1 verse](aor inf act -- and many other forms) "To set at variances" is the Greek dichazo, which means to "divide in two" and "divide by two." This is the verb from of the noun dichas (διχάς) which means "middle" and "half." - -- (WW) "Set" is an English verb from the phrase "set at variance" used to translate the Greek verb that means "to halve." "to split in the middle," or "to divide by two."

didaskalos

διδάσκαλον [10 verses](noun sg masc acc) ""Master" is didaskalos, which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer." -- "Master" is translated from a Greek word that means "teacher," and "trainer." It is usually translated as "Master" in the Gospels, but the main sense is always "teacher." The Greek word often translated as "Lord" means "Master" in the sense of one in charge of others.

10
didasko

() "Teach" is didasko, which means "to teach", "to instruct", "to indicate", "to explain," and "to give sign of." -- The Greek verb translated as "shall teach" means "to teach", "to instruct", and "to give a sign of." It is the root for the common word for "teacher" or "master". 

didomi

δοθήσεται [147 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be given" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." -- The verb translated as "given" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

147
dierchomai

διέρχεται [3 verses](3rd sg pres ind mp) "Walk" is from dierchomai,which means "to go through", "complete", "shoot through" (of pain), "pass through and reach", "arrive at", "go through in detail", "recount," of Time, "pass", "elapse," and "to pass through." It is the same base word, -erchomai, ("start," "come," "arrive") as many words, but with the prefix dia-, which means "through", "throughout," and "in the midst of" and is used to describe passage through both time and space.  - "Walk" is a Greek verb that means "to go through ", "arrive," and "to pass through." It does not mean "walk".  It has a number of special meanings such as "pass" when applied to time. Its prefix is the same as the following preposition meaning "through". 

3
diexodos

διεξόδους [2 verses](noun pl fem acc) "Highways" is diexodos, which means "outlet", "passage", "roads out of town," and "way out from." Literally, it means "through exit."  - "Highways" is from a noun that means "outlet", "passage," and "roads out of town."

2
dikaioo

δικαιωθήσῃ, [4 verses]( 2nd sg fut ind pass) "Thou shalt be justified" is from dikaioo, which means to "set right", "hold or deem right", "proved", "tested," "claim or demand as a right", "that which is ordained", "pronounce judgment," "chastise", "punish," and, in the passive, "have right done one."  - "Shall be justified" is from an uncommon Greek verb that means "to set right", "to claim or hold as a right," and "to do a man justice." However, it also means "to chastise" and "to punish". In the passive form that is used here, it means "to have right done to one."

dikaios

δικαίους [21 verses](adj pl masc/fem acc) "The righteous" is dikaios which means "observant of rules", "observant of customs", "well-ordered", "civilized," and "observant of duty." Later it means "well-balanced", "impartial," and "just." As a verb, it means to "set right", "hold or deem right", "claim or demand as a right", "pronounce judgment", "do a man right or justice", "chastise", "punish, and in passive, "have right done one." -- The Greek adjective translated as "the righteous" means "observant of rules", "observant of customs", "well-ordered", "civilized," and "observant of duty." It could be translated as "law-abiding".

dikaiosyne

δικαιοσύνην, [10 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Righteousness" is dikaiosyne, which means "righteousness", "justice", "fulfillment of the law," and "the business of a judge." It carries the sense of virtue but specifically that of fulfilling legal or social requirements. -- The word translated as "righteousness" also means "justice" and generally "fulfillment of the law". When applied to God or any judge, it works best as "justice," but when applied to people "virtue" or "law-abiding" works better since we don't use "righteousness" must anymore.

diogmos

διωγμοῦ [3 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Persecution" is diogmos, which means "the chase", "pursuit," and "harassment." Related to the much more common dioko.  -  - "Persecution" is from a noun which means "the chase", "pursuit," and "harassment."

dioko

διώξετε [12 verses](verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Persecuted" is dioko, which means "to cause to run", "to set into motion", "to pursue", "to chase [away]," to follow", "to seek after," "to be hurried (passive)," "to urge on", "to prosecute [legally]", " or "to drive." -- The word translated as "persecute" means "to chase" in both the sense of "chase away" and "seek after." It also means "to prosecute' in a legal sense. In English, we describe someone as being chased and harassed as "being hounded." That idea seems to come closest to capturing Jesus's use of this word.

12
diorysso

διορυχθῆναι [4 verses](verb aor inf pass) "To be broken up" is diorysso, which means "digging through, "having dug a trench across or along," metaph "undermine", "ruin", "worm out," and Pass., "to be shut up in a funeral vault."

4
diplous

διπλότερον [1 verse](adj sg masc/neut nom/acc comp) "Twofold more" is diplous, which means "twofold", "double", "twice the size of," and "as much again."  - The "twofold more" is another unusual word that means "twofold", "double", "twice the size of," and "as much again."

1
dipsao

() "Thirst" is dipsao, which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," "to be parched", "to be in want of", "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing.

distazo

ἐδίστασας; [1 verses](verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Did you doubt" is distazo , which means "to doubt" and "to hesitate." In the passive it means "to be in doubt." It means literally, "to drop twice."  - "Did you doubt" is from distazô , which means "to doubt" and "to hesitate." It means literally, "to drop twice."

diylizo

διυλίζοντες [1 verse] (part pl pres act masc nom) "Strain" is from diylizo, which means "strain," and "filter thoroughly."

1
dodeka

δώδεκα [5 verses](number) "Twelve" is dodeka, which is the number "twelve," and a noun meaning "a group of twelve."  - -- "Twelve" is the Greek word for the number.

dokeo

δοκεῖ, [17 verses](verb 2nd sg pres ind mp) "Thinkest thou" is dokeo, which means "expect", "suppose", "imagine", "have an opinion", "seem", "seem good," and "to be reputed." -- The word translated as "think" doesn't mean think as much as it means "expect" or "imagine."

dokos

() "Beam" is dokos, which means "bearing-beam", "main beam", "plank", "support", "beam", "strut", "brace", "firewood", "bar [of a gate or door]," and "a kind of meteor." -- The term translated as "beam" means the main bearing beam in a house that holds up the roof or floor but also covers any stick of wood. It is perhaps meaningful that it is the term for the bar on a door.

dolos

δόλος [3 verses](noun sg masc nom ) "Guile" is dolos, which means "bait", "a cunning contrivance", "treachery", "trick," and "stratagem." -- "Deceit" is a noun that means "bait", "a cunning contrivance", "treachery", "trick," and "stratagem." It is only used in two other places by Jesus.

doma

δόματα [2 verses](noun pl neut acc ) "Gifts" is doma, which means "gift" and "payment." -- The word for "gifts" also means "payments." -- The word for "gifts" also means "payments."

doma

δωμάτων. [5 verses] (noun pl neut gen) "Housetops" is doma, which means a "a house", "a hall", "housetop", "chief room", "household," or "a family." -- "Housetops" is translated from a Greek word that is the source of our word domicile. It has most of the same meanings as the word Christ usually uses for "house," but it also means the chief room of a house and the housetop.

dorea

δωρεὰν [1 verse](noun sg fem acc) "Gift" is from dorea, which means "gift", "present", "bounty," and, as an adverb, "free gift," and "freely." - The word translated as "gift" has the broader sense of "bounty" and indicates a strong sense of generosity, that is, that the things that are given freely. This noun is only used once by Jesus.

dorean

δωρεὰν [2 verses](adv)  "Freely" is from dorean, which means "as a free gift," and "undeserved," from a root that means "gift" and "present." - "Freely" is from the Greek adverb that means "freely" and as an adjective, "as a free gift," and "underserved," from the word for "gift."

doron

δῶρον [8 verses](noun sg neut nom) "Gift" is doron, which means "gift", "present," and specifically a "votive gift" or "offering" to a god. The simpler term without the sense of a votive offering is "dorea."  - The word translated as "gift" means "gift," or "offering" but it has the special meaning of an offering to the gods. These gifts were "burnt" offerings, offerings that were burnt upon the grill that was the altar.

doulos

δοῦλος [56 verses](noun sg masc nom) "The servant" is doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave." -- The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

doxa

δόξῃ [26 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Glory" is doxa, which means "expectation", "notion", "opinion", "repute," and "popular repute." Translations as "glory" or "splendor" are applied to external appearances but are found primarily in translating the Bible. The words "recognition", "honor". and "reputation" come closest to capturing the way Jesus uses the word, especially if we consider how he uses the verb form. -- The Greek noun translated as "glory" means "expectation", "notion", "opinion", "repute," and "popular repute." Translations as "glory" or "splendor" are found primarily in translating the Bible. The words "recognition", "reputation", and "an honor" come closest to capturing the way Christ uses the word.

doxazo

() "Honour" is doxazo, which primarily means "to think", "to expect", "to imagine," or "to suppose." Secondarily, it means "to magnify" or "to extol," which is where we get the "glorify" used most often in NT the translation. The English term "to recognize" carries the same sense of both seeing a person in the mind and honoring them. -- The Greek term translated as "to have glory" is a word that primarily means "to imagine" and "to expect." It also means "to honor" in a sense. However, the word that it comes closest to in English is "to recognize" since that word captures both the mental imaging and honoring sense of the word. "Recognize" works especially well with actors because they seek fame and recognition from the audience. More about this word in this article

duo

δύο. [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple." -- The "twain" is the numeral, "two," which, like numbers in English, plays a lot of roles. Often, it acts as an adjective, but without a noun to modify, so it takes on the role of a noun. The Greek word is "duo," which of course in English means "a pair of singers", or, more generally, any "pair." It uses joins the two people walking together as a pair or a couple.

duro

ἔδειραν, [1 verse](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Beat" is duro, which means to "skin", "flay," of animals, colloquially, "cudgel," and "thrash."  - "Beat" is from a verb that means to "skin", "flay," of animals, colloquially, "cudgel," and "thrash."

dynamai

δύναται [61 verses](3rd sg pres ind mp) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough." - The word translated as "I can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

dynamis

δυνάμεις [16 verses](noun pl fem nom/acc)   "Mighty works"is dynamis, which means "power", "might", "influence", "authority", "capacity", "elementary force", "force of a word," and "value of money." Elemental forces are forces such as heat and cold. -- "Mighty works" is a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry a sense of authority over others, either people or laws. The verb form of this word is translated as "can" in the NT.

16
dynatos

δυνατά.” [9 verses](adj pl neut nom) "Be able" is from dynatos, which means "strong", "mighty", "possible," and "practicable." -- Possible" is from an adjective which means "strong", "mighty", "possible," and "practicable." This is the adjective form of the noun usually translated as "power." Power is what makes things possible.

9
dyskolos

δυσκόλως [4 verses](adv) "Can hardly" is dyskolos, which means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "difficult to explain", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," (of animals) "intractable," (of things) "troublesome", "harassing," and, generally, "unpleasant." Add an "-ly" to these words to create adverbs with this sense.  - "Hardly" is from an adjective in the form of an adverb, modifying the verb, not the noun. It means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please," and "difficult to explain." However, since its form is that of an adverb it describes the way one enters as "hard to satisfy" or "hard to please."

dysme

δυσμῶν, [3 verses](noun pl fem gen) "West" is dysme, which means "setting (mostly in pl.)", "the quarter of sunset," and "west." -- The word translated as "west" means "setting," as the opposite of "rising."

3
e

[92 verses](conj/adv)  "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." OR (exclam) "Or" is e which is an exclamation meaning "hi!" OR (adv) "Or" is e, which is an adverb meaning "in truth" and "of a surety". -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

92
ean

ὰν [162 verses](conj) "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

162
ean me

Ἐὰν μὴ (conj particle) "But" is ean me, which means "if not." "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. "Not" is (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no."

eao

εἴασεν [6 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Have suffered" is from eao, which means "to suffer", "to permit", "to let alone", "giving up," "to concede" in an argument, and "to let be."  - "Suffered" is from a verb that means to "suffer", "to permit", and "to let alone". This word is used for the first time here in the NT. Its sense is "permit".

6
echidna

ἐχιδνῶν, [2 verses](noun pl fem gen) "Vipers" is echidna, which means "viper", "constrictor snake," and is a metaphor for a treacherous wife or friend. --  "Vipers" is from a Greek word that means "viper", "constrictor snake," and is a metaphor for a treacherous wife or friend.

echo

ἔχει: [181 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "He hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, "acquire," "get," -- The word translated as "have" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and many specific uses. This verb isn't used to form past tenses as it is in English. 

181
echthros

ἐχθροὶ[12 verses] (adj pl masc nom ) "Enemy" is echthros, which means "the hated", "the hateful", "the hostile", "the enemy", "the alienated," and "the hating." -- -- The word translated as "foes" primarily means "hated", "hater,"  "hateful," and "hating." It is an adjective used as a noun. The use of this word is very specific in Greek literature. It describes one who was a friend, but who has been alienated and refuses to be reconciled. It is from a rare Greek word meaning "hate," but it is not from the Greek word that Jesus uses for hate. It is usually translated as "enemy" in the KJV.  However, from Jesus's point of view "the enemy" seems to be "hating" others.

ede

ἤδη [13 verses](adv) "Yet" is ede, which means "already", "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place. -- "Now" is a Greek adverb meaning "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

13
egeiro

ἐγείρονται [41 verses](3rd pl pres ind mp) "Arise" is egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse." -- The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising.

41
eggizo

ἤγγισεν [17 verses](3rd, aor act sg ind) "Drew" "Is at hand" is eggizo, which means "to bring near", "to join one things to another," to draw near," and "to approach." This word does not appear in the Perseus dictionary. It comes from an adverb ἐγγύς, eggys, which means 1) (of place) "near", "nigh", "at hand," 2) (of time) "nigh at hand" 3) (of numbers) "nearly", "almost", "coming near," and 4) (of relationship) "akin to." -- The word translated as "is at hand" is the verb form of an adverb that means "near" in space, time, and relationships. It means "to bring near", "to approach", "to bring up to," and "to be imminent." In English, we would say "nears" or, in the form here, "has neared," doesn't quite work so perhaps "has gotten close" or, in the case of time, "is nearly here." This is the same verb that is translated as "is at hand" in the phrase, "The kingdom of heaven is at hand." It is not seen in written Greek before Jesus and used by him only seventeen times.

17
eggys

ἐγγὺς [6 verses](adv) "Nigh" is eggys, which means "near", "nigh", "at hand," nearly", "coming near," and "akin." -- The adverb translated as "nigh" means near in time or distance.

6
ego

ἐγὼ [162 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

ei

εἰ [90 verses](conj) "If" is ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions. -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

90
ei me

εἰ μὴ [14 verses](conj particle) "Except" is ei me, which is the conjunction that means "if not", "but," and "except." εἰ is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether." (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." - Two Greek words are translated as "except". Literally, they mean "if not" but this phrase is used to mean "except", "instead", and "but."

14
eido

ἰδεῖν [166 verses](verb aor inf act) "Tosee" is eido which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." -- The verb translated as "knoweth" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." In th KJV, it is almost translated as many times as "know" as it is "see,"

eikon

εἰκὼν [3 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Image" is eikôn, which means "likeness", "image", "image in a mirror", "personal description", "semblance", "comparison," and "archetype." It is the source of our word "icon."

3
eimi

ἐστίν.[614 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." With the genitive object, the sense is "belongs to." -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. With the genitive object, the sense is "belongs to."-- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

614
eipon

εἴπῃ [162 verses] (3rd sg aor subj act) "Speaketh" "I have called" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."  - The word translated as "speaketh" means "to say" and "to speak". It is one of the two most common words translated "speak," "say" and "tell," but it has more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

eirene

εἰρήνη (noun sg fem nom) "Peace" is eirene, which means "time of peace," "national tranquility," "peace", "tranquility," "personal tranquility," and "harmony." It is the name for the goddess of peace. -- "Peace" is the Greek term that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health.

eirenopoios

() "Peacemaker" is eirenopoios, which means literally, "one who produces peace" or "one who makes peaceful." The first part of the word comes from eirene, a noun which means both the freedom from fear and a treaty of peace between countries. The last part of the word is the verb, poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

eis

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

eisakouo

εἰσακουσθήσονται: [1 verse](3rd pl fut ind pass) "They shall be heard" is eisakouo, which means "to hearken, "to give ear to one", "to give way", "to yield to a request", "to perceive", "to feel effect of," and "to hear." -- The word translated as "they shall be heard" is a little more complicated than the translation. It is another compound word meaning "to hear in regard to." In the passive, it means to be heard in regard to something. It means that someone has been listened to and their advice followed or it means that someone has granted a request made of them.

eiserchomai

εἴσελθε [68 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat) "Enter" is eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind." -- "Ye shall enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

68
ek

ἐκ {ἐξ} [121 verses] (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from;" 6) cause, instrument, or means "by." -- The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

121
ekballo

ἐκβάλλει [33 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Cast out" is ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter." -- "Cast out" is a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

33
ekcheo

ἐκχεῖται [8 verses](sg pres ind mp) "Runneth out" is ekcheo, which means to "pour out", "pour away", " spill", "squander", "waste", "spread out", "throw down," and, as a metaphor, "to be cast away", "forgotten", "give oneself up to any emotion," and "to be overjoyed." -- The Greek word translated as "runneth out" means "to pour out," and "spill," but it is a metaphor for "to be forgotten" and to be "overcome with emotion."

ekei

ἐκεῖ: [33 verses](adv) "Yonder place" is ekei, which means "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world." --The word translated as "there" means "there" or "in that place" but it also means "the intelligible world," that is, the world we understand. It refers to a place much more strongly than our word "there" which can be a simple helper to introduce a verb of being. In Greek, the verb used alone has the sense of "there is" or "there are."

33
ekeinos

ἐκείνῃ [107 verses](adj sg fem dat) "That" is ekeinos, which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", and as in the form of an adverb, "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." -- The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."

107
ekeithen

(adv) "Place" is from ekeithen, which means "from that place", "thence", "from that fact," and "thenceforward."

ekklesia

ἐκκλησίᾳ: [2 verses](noun sg fem dat) "The church" is ekklesia, which means an "assembly duly called." It comes from two Greek words meaning "to call away from." It describes an impromptu assembly of local people called away from their jobs to meet. The idea here is something less formal than to our idea of a jury, but a group of peers rather than a government organ.  - Through its use in the Epistles, the word translated here as "church" came to mean "church" but this was later in history. In Christ's time, it means an assembly of local people, like a town meeting but less formal that we think of meetings. Jesus uses it only used twice, once here and in Matthew 16:18 (not at all in Mark, Luke, or John) when Jesus tells Peter he is the rock on which this assembly will be built. The word only came into extensive use in the Act of the Apostles, which describes the local assemblies of the Christian community. Jesus could not have used to term in that sense or at least those listening to him would not have heard it that way.

ekkopto

ἐκκόπτεται [5 verses](3rd sg pres ind mp) "Cut it off" is ekkopto, which means "to cut out", "to knock off", "to beat off [in battle]", "to hinder", "to break open", "to win [in throwing dice]", "to erase [an inscription]," "to come to a stop", "to stamp a coin", "to pause," or "to cut off." It is also a metaphor for "to make an end of." The root koptô means "to smite", "to pound," "to chop," "to cut off," and "to beat one's breast. The prefix means "from" or "out of." -- The word translated as "is hewn down" means various forms of being "cut off," an idea that has a range of meanings similar to those in English from being hindered to being chopped down or ended. What makes it interesting is, though it is translated as something that happens to the tree in English (the passive voice), in Greek it is the "middle voice" indicating something that the tree does to itself. In dice, it means "to win."

eklampo

ἐκλάμψουσιν” [1 verse] (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "Shall shine forth" is eklampo, which means to "shine or beam forth," of sound, "be clearly heard," "burst forth violently", "to be distinguished," and "flash forth." From the root, lampo, "shine out."  - "Shine forth" is from a verb that manes "to shine or beam forth," "to be distinguished," and "flash forth." The prefix means "from" and "out of." The root is the word means "shine out"

eklegomai

() "I have chosen" is eklegomai, which means "to pick out" "to single out," and "to choose for oneself."

eklektos

ἐκλεκτοί. [8 verses](adj pl masc nom) "Chosen" is eklektos, which means "picked out", "select", "choice," and "pure." The adjective is from is eklektoo, the verb form meaning "to be separated," or "to be purified". - "Chosen" is translated from a Greek word that means "picked out", "select", "choice," and "pure." It is translated elsewhere as "the elect." Our English word "elect" is adapted from Biblical Greek through Latin.

8
ekphyo

ἐκφύῃ, [2 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj act/passive) "Puteth forth" is ekphyo, which means "generate," produce", "bear", "grow," and "engender."

2
ekporeuomai

ἐκπορευόμενα [11 verses](part pl pres mp neut nom) " things which proceedeth" is ekporeuomai, which means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out."  - - (WV) "Proceed" is a verb that means literally, "to make to go or carry out of" and is translated regularly as "to make to go out of", "to fetch out," and "to march out," but in modern English, we would probably say "exit" here. It is in the form of an adjective used as a noun. It is either passive, "are made to go out" or a form where the subject acts itself "the things bringing themselves "

ekrizoo

ἐκριζώσητε [3 verses](verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye root up" is ekrizoo, which means "root out." -- The word translated as "root up" is a word only found initially in the Septuagint. It is the compound of the verb meaning to "root" (from the noun meaning "root") and a prefix meaning "from" or "away from."

ekteino

Ἔκτεινόν [4 verses](2nd sg aor imperat act) "Stretch forth" is ekteinô, which means "to stretch out", "to offer food", "to prostrate yourself", "to straighten", "spread out," to extend," "spin out, "prolong", "put forth" and, in the passive, "be unfolded", "be smoothed."  - "Stretch forth" is  a verb that means "to stretch out," but also means "to offer food", "to prostrate yourself," and "to extend." The Greek word for "stretch" has the same meaning as the word in English with all its related ideas of extending yourself and your abilities. This extension of abilities has the same sense of being work and a struggle.

ektinasso

() "Shake off" is ektinasso, which means "to shake out (in cleaning)", "to expel", "to shake off", "to make a disturbance," "to search thoroughly", "to kick out (of animals)," and in the passive "is thrown out." -- The word translated as "shake of" means "to shake out" while cleaning.

ektos,

ἐκτὸς [unique] (adv) "Outside" is the adverb ektos, which means "without", "outside,"with verbs of motion, "out," as a preposition, "out of", "far from", "beyond", "exempt from", "except", "without the consent of," as a noun, "external things", "strangers", "foreigners", "the vulgar," and "the common herd."  - "The outside" is from two Greek words like "that which is within" above. The first is the article, "the" and the second is the adverb that means "outside" and "without." Like the "within" above, this is from the same root words as the outside in the previous verse, but it is a different word. More interesting, this word has a number of special meanings when used as a noun as it is here. It means "external part," but it also means "outsider" and "the common people." This is likely why the word was changed here from the previous verse, since the word used previously does not have these meanings.

elachistos

(adj pl fem gen) "Least" is from elachistos, which is the superlative form of elachus which means "small", "little," and "short." It means "the smallest", "the shortest", "the least," and "the fewest." -- The word translated as "the least" also means "smallest", "the shortest", "the fewest", and similar ideas. 

elaion

ἀγγείοις [1 verse] (noun pl neut dat) "Vessels" is from aggeion, which means "vessel", "pail", "bucket", sack", "receptacle", "reservoir", "coffin", and "sarcophagus."  - The word for "vessels" means any container from "receptacle", to a "sack", to a "coffin."

1
elaion

ἔλαιον: [5 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Oil" is from elaion, which means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance."

5
elaphros

ἐλαφρόν  [1 verses] (adj sg neut nom​) "Light" is elaphros, which specifically means "light in weight", "easy to bear", "not burdensome", "easy", "light in moving", "nimble", "light minded", "thoughtless", "relieved" of a burden, and as an adverb, "lightly", "buoyantly."  - This is the only time Christ uses this word for "light." It means "light in weight," but when specifically applied to burdens, it means relieving them. It also means "simple-minded" when applied to thinking, which may be a larger topic here.

eleemon

() "Merciful" is eleemon, which is a noun meaning the "pitiful" and "merciful."

eleemosyne

() "Thine alms" is eleemosyne, which means "pity", "mercy", "charity," and "alms." It is the noun for of the verb eleeo, which means "to have pity on," "to show mercy to," and "to feel pity." In the passive, "to be shown pity," and "to be pitied." -- The Greek word translated as "charity" is the Greek source for our word "alms." However, primarily means "pity" or "mercy." It is another form of the word used in the Beatitudes as "merciful" and "obtain mercy."

eleeo

ἐλεῆσαι [10 verses](verb aor inf act) "Have had compassion" is the verb eleeo, which means "to have pity on," "to show pity to," and "to feel pity." In the passive, "to be shown pity," and "to be pitied."  - "Have had compassion" and "had mercy" are both from the same verb. It means "to have pity on," and "to show mercy to." In this first occurrence, it is not an active verb, but an infinitive, "to have mercy."

elegcho

ἔλεγξον [4 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Tell him his fault" is elegcho, which "to disgrace", "to put to shame", "to cross-examine", "to question", "to test", "to prove", "to refute", "to put right", "to get the better of", "to expose," and "to decide a dispute."  - "Tell him his fault" is from a verb from the word that means "to disgrace", "to put to shame", "to cross-examine", "to expose," and "to decide a dispute." Jesus only uses it four times and seems to used it to mean "accuse."

eleos

Ἔλεος [4 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc)"Mercy" is eleos, which means "pity", "mercy," and "compassion." -- The Greek term translated as "mercy" means "good will toward the afflicted." It also means "pity" and "compassion." In the original Hebrew, "mercy" is checed, which means "goodness", "kindness," and "faithfulness." It also means "to be ashamed" and "a reproach." Based on the verb checed ("to be kind"), the adjective combines both the idea of being good and feel guilty if you are not good.

4
Elias

Ἠλείας”  [13 verses] (HebrewName) - "Elias" is Elias, the Greek form of the biblical name for Elijah.  - -- Elias is the Greek form of the name of the prophet we call "Elijah." Jesus refers to Elijah only here and in Mark as a forerunner or harbinger of the Christ. However, he also appears with Jesus along with Moses. More about Jesus's use of OT figures in this article.

emautou

(pronoun) "Myself" is emautou, which means "of me," and "of myself". -- The Greek reflexive pronoun is translated as myself.

emblepo

ἐμβλέψατε [1 verse](2nd pl aor imperat act) "Behold" is emblepo, which means "look in the face", "look at," "look into", "consider," and "look." - "Behold" is from a Greek verb that means "look at" or "consider." It is not the common word Jesus uses which is usually translated as "behold". This verb has more of a sense of looking on or into something. We might use "examine."

eme

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

emoi

ἐμοὶ (noun sg masc dat) "Me" is emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb. -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek. 

emos

ἐμὴν (adj sg fem acc) "My" is emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me." -- "My" is the regular first-person adjective in Greek indicating possession, so  "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."

emou

(noun sg masc gen) "My" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

empimprēmi

ἐνέπρησεν. [1 verse] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Burned up" is from empimprēmi, which, with the "m" means "kindle", "set on fire," and in the passive, "to be set on fire," and "to be inflamed" and, without the "m", to "blow up", "inflate," and in the passive, "bloated" and "swollen."

1
empipto

ἐμπέσῃ [3 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Fall into" is from empipto, which means to "fall upon", "fall in" and "to fall on." It's root is the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon," "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon," "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class).  - "Fall" is  a verb, which means "to fall in" and "to fall on." The root verb has means "to fall" that has a wide variety of meanings and the prefix/preposition that means "in". "on". and "among."

emporia

ἐμπορίαν [1 verse](noun sg fem acc/gen) "Merchandise" is emporia, which means "commerce", "trade by sea," "a trade or business", "errand", "business," "journeying," and "merchandise."  - The word translated as "merchandise" means "commerce", "a trade or business," and "merchandise."

1
emprosthen

ἔμπροσθεν [18 verses](adv, prep) "Before" is emprosthen, which as an adverb means [of place]"in front of", "before", "forwards," [of time] "before", "of old," and as a preposition, "facing", "opposite", "in front," [of time] beforehand," and [of degree] "preferred before." It also denotes a ranking. Takes a genitive object. -- The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

en

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is en, which means, with a dative object, "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," "during,"  and "with". With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during."  -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within", "with," "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

413
enatos

ἐνάτην [1 verse](adj sg fem acc) "Ninth" is enatos, which means "ninth."

endyma

ἐνδύματος; [5 verses](noun sg neut gen ) "Raiment" is endyma, which means "garment," and "covering." -- The word translated as "raiment" means "clothing" or "covering."  It is from the same root as the verb commonly translated as "put on" when referring to clothing.

5
endyo

ἐνδύσησθε: [6 verses](2nd pl aor subj mid) "Put on" is endyo, which means to "go into", "put on [clothes]", "enter", "press into", "sink in", "enter upon it", "undertake it," and "insinuate oneself into." -- The word translated as "ye shall put on" one means that when the context is clothes. This is not obviously the case here. It more generally means "get into," which seems to be what Christ is saying.

enenekonta

ἐνενήκοντα [4 verses]] (numeral)"The ninety nine" is enenekonta that is the Greek number ninty plus the number ennea, the number nine. The article preceding it makes it a noun and the object of the verb.

enkrupto

ἐνέκρυψεν [2 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "And hid" is enkruptô which literally means "to hide in ""to bank (a fire)," or "to conceal in."  - "Hid" is from a Greek verb meaning "to hide in" or "to conceal in." It is the Greek form of our word "encrypt." Here, "enfolds" is probably the closest literal translation though "encrypt" is the symbolic meaning.

ennea

ἐννέα [5 verses](numeral) "Nine" is ennea, the number "nine".

enochos

ἔνοχός [3 verses]( adj sg masc nom )  "In danger" is enochos ( ἔνοχος ), which means "held in by", "bound by", "liable to", "subject to", "guilty," and "liable to a penalty for." - -- The Greek word translated as "in danger", primarily means being "bound" or "tied" but also has the sense of "obligated" to something.

enopion

[uncommon](prep) "Before" is from enopionwhich means " facing" and "to the front".  -- The Greek term translated as "before" is not used outside of Luke except once in John. It appears here for the first time in Jesus's words here. It means "in front of". 

enopion

 [uncommon](prep) "Before" is from enopionwhich means " facing" and "to the front".  -- The Greek term translated as "before" is not used outside of Luke except once in John. It appears here for the first time in Jesus's words here. It means "in front of". 

entalma

ἐντάλματα [2 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Commandments" is from entalma, which means "to order".  It is a form of entolê which means "injunction", "order," and "command." -- The Greek translated as "commandments" means " is a rare form of another Greek noun that means "injunction", "order," and "command." This form is used only here, in the parallel verse, Mar 7:7, and in the Septuagint version. While Jesus often uses an unusual word for wordplay, he also uses them to be consistent with the original scripture. Except for here, quoting the Septuagint, Jesus used the common form of this noun.

enteuthen

ἔνθεν [5 verses](adv) "Hence" is enteuthen, which means "from that place" and "hence." -- "Hence" is a word that means "from that place" and "hence." In English, in this context, we would say "from here.

enthumeomai

ἐνθυμεῖσθε [1 verse](2nd pl imperf ind mp) "Think" is from enthumeomai, which means "to ponder", "to notice", ""to infer", "think much or deeply of", "take to heart", "be concerned or angry at", "form a plan", "conclude. In the passive, it means "to be in a person's thoughts," and "to be desired." -- The term translated as "think" is not a common Greek word that is usually translated as "think" in the KJV. This word is used by Jesus only here. It means "to ponder", "to notice," or "to infer." In the passive, it means "to be thought about or desired", but here it is in a form, which means that the subject is being acted upon by itself or for its own benefit, that is, "you are thinking about yourselves". This form is plural.

entole

ἐντολὴν [23 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Commandments" is entole which means "injunction", "order," and "command." -- The word translated as "commandments" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society. Jesus uses it to refer to the written Law, his lessons, and the commands given by someone in authority.

entos

ἔντος [2 verses] (adverb) "Within" is entos, which means "within", "inside", "on this side", "acquainted with," of time "within", "short of," i.e. "before."

2
epairo

() "Hath lifted up" is epairo, which means "lift up", "set on", "raise", "stir up", "excite", "urge on," and "persuade."

epanistemi

ἐπαναστήσονται [1 verse](3rd pl fut ind mid) "Shall rise up" is epanistemi, which means to "set up again", "make to rise against", "raise in revolt", "stand up after", "rise from "bed," rise, rise up against", "rise in insurrection against", "to be raised or built (of buildings)," and " rise above. -- "Rise up" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "set up again", "to make to rise against," and "to revolt." It is in the form which indicates that the subject is acting on itself.

epano

ἐπάνω [8 verses](prep/adv) "Over" is epano, which is an adverb meaning "above", "on the upper side", "[former] times", "more [of numbers]", "in front of," and "in the presence of." -- The word "thereon" is from a preposition meaning both "on" and "in front of."

8
epereazo

() "Them which despitefully use" is from epereazo, which means to "threaten abusively", "deal despitefully with", "act despitefully towards", "to be insolent", and in the passive, "the be insulted". 

epi

ἐπὶ [138 verses](prep) "On" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." With a noun in the possessive, genitive, it means "upon", "on" but not necessarily of Place, "by (of persons)", "deep (with numbers)", "in the presence of", "towards", "in the time of," and "over (referring to a person of authority)." With a noun indirect object, dative, it means of place: "upon", "on," or "over", of people: "against (in a hostile sense)," regarding a situation: "towards" or "in reference to," of an accumulation: "upon", "after", "addition to," and "besides," of position: "after", "behind", "in dependence upon," and "in the power of," of time: "by," and "after," and. in a causal sense: "of the occasion or cause", "of an end or purpose", "of the condition upon which a thing is done", "on condition that," and "of price." With the objective noun, an accusative, it means of place: "upon or on to a height", "up to", "as far as", "a little way", "a little", "towards", "to," in hostile sense: "against," of extension: "over", "over (a space)," of time: "for", "during", "up to" or "till," in a causal sense: "of (the object)," for (this purpose)", "as regards", "according to," and "by (this cause)." With verbs of perceiving, observing, judging, it means "in the case of." -- The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" "in the case of." or "on."

138
epiballo

ἐπιβάλλει [5 verses] (3rd sg pres ind act)"Putteth" is epiballo, which means to "throw or cast upon", "lay on", " affix (a seal, add)," "contribute", "place next in order", "let grow", "let loose", "throw oneself upon", "go straight towards", "follow", "come next", "belong to", "fall to the share of", "shut to", "close", "to overlap (in logic)," and in the passive to "lie upon", "be put upon," and "be set over." -- The word translated as "putteth" means literally to" throw against, before, by or on," but it has a large variety of specific uses. It implication is that the patching is not well done, but just thrown on.

5
epiblema

ἐπίβλημα [3 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc ) "A piece" is epiblema, which means "that which is thrown over", "covering", "tapestry", "hangings", "that which is put on", "piece of embroidery," and "outer bandage." -- The word translated as "piece" uses the same base as the word above and means "something thrown over" or "tossed on." However, here, it makes the most sense as a bandage.

epideiknymi

ἐπιδείξατέ [2 verses](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Shew" is epideiknymi, which means to "exhibit as a specimen", "parade" it before, "show off" or "display" for oneself or what is one's own, "give a specimen of", "show" in the sense of "point out," and "show" in the sense of "prove."  - "Show" is an unusual word for Jesus to use,  meaning to "display" or "exhibit."

2
epididōmi

ἐπιδώσει [4 verses (3rd sg fut ind act) "Will he give" is epididōmi which means to "give besides", "give afterwards", "contribute as a `benevolence'", "give freely", "bestow", "give oneself up", "devote oneself", "give into another's hands", "deliver", "take as one's witness", "increase", "advance", "improve", "give in," and "give way." -- The word translated as "will he give" is not from the normal verb translated as "give" , but a more complicated word meaning "give besides" or "bestow."

4
epiginosko

ἐπιγνώσεσθε [4 verses](2nd pl fut ind mid) "Ye shall know" is epiginosko, which means "look upon", "witness", "observe", "recognize", "find out," "discover", "learn to know", "take notice of", "come to a judgment", "decide", "acknowledge," and "approve." -- The word means literally, "on learning to know" or "by learning to know." Generally, it means "to witness" or "to discover." Literally, it means "learning from." Jesus uses it to mean "recognize" in the sense of "identify" not "reward."

epigraphê

ἐπιγραφή; [3 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Superscription" is epigraphê, which means "inscription", "title", "ascription," and "description." It is from the verb that means, literally, "to write upon."

3
epiorkeo

ἐπιορκήσεις, [1 verse](2nd sg aor subj act )"Thou shalt...forswear thyself," is epiorkeo, (2nd sg aor subj act) -- The Greek word translated as "forswear" specifically means "to swear falsely', "recant", or "renege" on a promise. Its meaning is literally "against an oath". Its root word is the same as the noun translated later in this verse as "oath".  It is the negative verbal form of that word below. This word is only used by Jesus here.which means "to swear falsely," and "to forswear oneself."

epiousios,

ἐπιούσιον [2 verses](adj sg neut acc) "Daily" is epiousios, which may mean, "the appropriate", "sufficient for the coming", which first appears in Greek here. It could be an adjective from the verb epiousa, which means "to come on, to approach." It may also be from epi eimi, meaning literally "upon being" or "being upon". Some suggest is means "over being" or "above being" (from another meaning of epi) with the sense of meaning "supernatural" or "super-essential". Discussion about its possible meanings go back to the very early Christian writers. It is not the Greek word "daily", which is a form of the word "day.". -- (WW)  The word translated as "daily" is a mystery and one of the most interesting words in the Gospels. See this article for a complete historical discussion of this word. The most likely meaning of the Greek is "existing upon."

2
epistrepho

ἐπιστραφήτω. [9 times](3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Return" is epistrepho, which means "to turn about", "to turn around", "turn towards", "return", "curve", "twist", "go back-and forwards", "pay attention to," "to turn one's mind towards," "regard", "conduct oneself," and "behave," and in the passive to "be converted", "to be distorted", "turn oneself round", "are turned," and as an adjective, "earnest", "vehement." -- "Return" is translated from a Greek word "to turn about" or "to turn around," but also means "cause to return" and "to turn one's mind towards" something. In the passive, which is used here, it means "to turn oneself around" or "be turned around."

episynago

ἐπισυναγαγεῖν [5 verses] (verb 1st sg aor ind act) "Gather together" is episynago, which means "to collect and bring to a place." It also means to "bring into" a conversation or to "infer" or "conclude."  -  This is not the common word usually translated as "gathered" but a compound form of it meaning "gather upon" or "collected over", like we would say "gathered up." Its idea is completed below with "together."

5
epithumia

ἐπεθύμησαν [1 verse]( verb 3rd pl aor ind act ) "Have desired" is from epithumia, which means "set one's heart upon", "long for", "covet", "eagerness for," "desire", "yearning," and "longing after." Passive, "to be desired." It is not the more common word meaning "desire" which is used in Luke 10:24.  - - "Desired" is a verb that means "to set one's heart up," and, more generally, to "desire", "yearning," and "longing after." The tense indicates something that happens at some specific point in time, past, present, or future. The more common Greek word meaning "to desire" is used Luke 10:24

epithymeo

ἐπιθυμῆσαι [5 verses](aor inf act) "To lust after" is epithymeo, which means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for." The root of this word is thymos, (θυμός), which is the seat of passion and heat. The prefix means "upon." -- (WW) "Lust" is a Greek verb that means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "too long for." The verb indicates heat and passion, but not sexual passion (see this article about the Greek root of this word meaning "chest")  Jesus uses this word five times, always in reference to hunger and thirst except for here. The form is an infinitive uses as a noun describing the action, so "the craving."

epitithemi

ἐπιτιθέασιν [4 verses]] (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Lay" is epitithemi, which means "to lay", "to put", "to place upon", "to set upon", "to put on," and "to dispatch."

4
epitrepo

ἐπέτρεψεν [1 verse](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Suffered" is epitrepo, which means 1) to "turn to", "turn over to", "overturn upon transfer", "bequeath", "commit", "entrust to another (as trustee)," (with dative)"rely upon", "leave to;","entrust oneself", "leave one's case to", "to entrust what is one's own to" 2) "give up", "yield", "give way," and 3) "command."  - - "Suffered" is from a verb which means to "turn to", "turn over to," "rely upon," "leave to;" "give "give way," and "command." When used with an indirect objects, as it is here, it means "rely upon" or "leave to."

epizeteo

ἐπιζητοῦσιν: [4 verses](3rd pl pres ind act) "Seek after" is epizeteo, which means "seek after", "wish for", "miss", "request," desire" and "demand" as well as searching for something. The Greek term translated as "seek after" means "seek after", "wish for", and "miss". The Greek root of this word is translated as "seek" in the KJV but Christ uses it more like we use "aim". This version of that word has the prefix that means "on", "at", or "upon", so "aim at" or "focus on" is the closest in English. This version of the word is usually used only negatively by Jesus.

erchomai

ἔρχονται [198 verses](3rd pl pres ind mp) "Come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

198
eremos,

ἔρημον [3 verses](adj sg neut acc) "The wilderness" is from eremos, which is an adjective (used as a noun) that means "desolate", "lonely", "solitary", "reft of", "destitute of", "bereft of", "unclaimed", "vacant," [of places] "deserted," [of people] "friendless," and "not gregarious."  -   - "Wilderness" is from an adjective meaning "desolate", "lonely," and "solitary." It has the sense of the English phrase "the middle of nowhere."

3
erêmôsis

ἐρημώσεως” [3 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Desolation" is erêmôsis, which means "making desolate." It is from erêm, which means "to strip bare", "desolate", "to lay waste", "to abandon", "to desert" "to bereave," and "to be left without." The Hebrew source is shamem, which means "to be desolate", "to stun", "to be appalled", "to devastate", "to ravage", "to cause horror," and "to cause oneself ruin." Christ uses the noun form, eremos, that is translated as "desert" or "wilderness."

3
ergates

ἐργάτας [8 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Workman" is ergates, which means "workman", "one who works the soil", "husbandman", "hard-working", "strenuous", "one who practices an art", "practitioner", "doer," and "producer." -- The word translated as "labourer " means "worker", but it more specifically means a "doer," a "producer," or one who practices an art. It has a very economic sense.

8
ergazomai

ἐργαζόμενοι [8 verses](part pl pres mp masc nom) "Traded" is ergazomai, which means to "work at", "make", "do", "perform", "work [a material]", "earn by working," work at a trade or business", " traffic," and "trade." - Christ uses a very businesslike term that means "to labor", "to trade", "to do business", "to earn by working," and "to acquire." -- "Traded" is a word Christ uses humorously. It means "work", "do," or "make," but it is not the common word Christ uses frequently, but a more sophisticated word he uses less commonly. He uses it to mean "make a living for yourself." The form is where the subject acts on himself, so "work yourself."

8
ergon

ἔργων [31 verses] (noun pl neut gen) "The works" is ergon, which means "works", "tasks", "deeds", "actions", "thing," and "matter." -- The Greek word translated as "works" means "deeds", "actions," and "things" in the sense of "every thing."

31
ero

ἐρρέθη [9 verses](3rd sg aor ind pass) "It hath been said," is ero, which means "to speak", "to say", "to pronounce", "to tell", "to let suffice", "to announce", "to proclaim," (in passive) "to be pronounced", "to be mentioned", "to be specified", "to be agreed," and "to be promised." -- (CW) The verb translated as "it was said," means "to pronounce", "to mention", " "to announce", "to proclaim,"   and, in the passive as used here, "to be pronounced", "to be mentioned", "to be specified", "to be agreed," and "to be promised." This is an uncommon verb for Christ to use to refer to simply saying or speaking, used primarily in the "commandment updates" of this section. There are three other verbs that are commonly used to mean "to say," "to speak," and "to tell." This verb is a more serious meaning, "to proclaim" or "to pronounce," and a lighter meaning "to be mentioned" and "to be pronounce." However, Jesus often uses more unusual words for humorous effect, which seems to the case here.

erotao

ἐρωτᾷς [17 verses](verb 2nd sg pres ind act) "Callest" is from erotaowhich means "to ask," "beg," or "to question."  -- The word translated as "ask" means "to ask"  "to beg," or "to question".  It means to "ask about a thing" or "the question a person."

Ēsaias

Ἠσαίου [3 verses](proper name) "Esaias" is from the Greek Ēsaias, which is the Greek word for the prophet Isaiah. - "Esaias" is the Greek spelling of the English name, Isaiah.

eschatos

ἔσχατα [21 verses](adj sg fem nom) "The last" is eschatos. In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." -- "Last" is from an adjective that, in space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." If the context is the previous verse, it can refer to distance or people so it means "furthest" or "meanest". However, clearly, its use is intended for a double meaning, meaning both. KJV English has a double meaning as well, but it is not quite the same.

esothen

ἔσωθεν [6 verses](adv) "Inwardly" is esothen, which means "from within", "inside", "within," and "inward." "Within" is esothen, which means "from within" and "inward." -- "Within" is the adverb meaning "inwardly."

6
esthio

ἐσθίων [30 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Eating" is esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion. -- The word translated as "ye shall eat" means "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier.

30
ethnikos

ἐθνικοὶ [4 verses](adj pl masc nom) "Gentiles" is ethnikos, which means "national", "provincial", "foriegn," and "gentile." It was used in the same way we would describe someone as an "ethnic" or "foreigner." Foreigners, the Greeks and Romans, were the rulers of the nation in Christ's time. -- The word translated as "publicans" generally refers to everyone who is not a Jew. This is one of two similar words that often get translated as "gentiles," but this is the less common form, which more clearly means "foreigners."  Jesus uses this word in contrast with "friends" so "strangers."

ethnos

ἔθνη [22 verses](noun pl neut nom) "Gentiles" is ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations." -- The word translated as "Gentiles" means "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. Jesus used it to mean "non-Judean" people.

eti

(adv) "Yet" is eti, which means "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree). -- Yet" is an adverb that means "yet" and "still", "already",  "longer", "no longer" (with a negative), "still" and "besides". 

eu

εὖ [4 verses](adv) "Good" is eu, the word for "well", "thoroughly", "competently", "fortunately," and "happily." -- (WF) The adverb translated as "good" is not a noun or an adjective, but an adverb. It means "well", "thoroughly", "competently", and "fortunately." This is the adverb form of "good", not the adjective "good". The word is uncommon for Christ to use as an adverb, but he commonly uses it in compound words such as the Greek word translated as "gospel" which means "good news." See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

euaggelio

(noun sg neut nom/acc) "Gospel" is euaggelio, which means a "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, " "good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news. -- "Gospel" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself. See this article on the word "Gospel." 

euaggelizo

εὐαγγελίζονται:” [5 verses] (3rd pl pres ind mp) "Preach" is from euaggelizowhich means "bring good news", "announce good things", "preach or proclaim as glad tidings," and, in the passive, "receive good news." -- "Preach" is translated from a Greek word that means to"bring good news," and, in the passive, "receive good news." Like the previous verb, it is not a passive, but in a form which indicates the subject acting on itself at some point in time. It is in the form of "to bring good news. It comes before the word translated as "must". 

eucharisteo

εὐχαριστῶ [2 verses](1st sg pres ind act) "I thank" is from eucharisteo, which means "to bestow a favor on", "to oblige", "to be thankful", "to return thanks," and "to be received with thanks."  - The Greek word translated as "thank" means both to offer a favor and to be grateful for receiving favors. The two ideas were tied together. The idea is that bestowing a favor automatically creates thankfulness. This is related to the sense of "debt" in the Gospels, which is a topic Christ addresses more commonly, most noticeably in the Lord's Prayer.

eudia

Εὐδία, [1 verse](noun sg fem nom) "Fair weather" is eudia, which means "fair weather" or "fine weather," and is a metaphor for "tranquility" and "peace."  - "Fair weather" is translated from a Greek word that means literally, "good weather." It is a metaphor for tranquility and peace. Jesus only uses this word in one verse.

eudokia

εὐδοκία [2 verses](noun sg fem nom ) "Good" is eudokia, which means "goodwill", "contentment", "an object of desire", "satisfaction," and "approval."  - "Good" is a word that means "goodwill", "contentment", "an object of desire", "satisfaction," and "approval." We might simply say "happiness." This is the only time Christ uses this word. This word is also in the form of the subject of the sentence so this is what "the father becomes". 

eukopo

εὐκοπώτερον, [7 verses](adj sg neut nom/acc comp) "Easier" is eukopo, which is a comparative form of "easy." It is a compound eu, the word for "well", "thoroughly", "competently", "fortunately," and "happily." and kopos, which means "striking", "beating", "toil and trouble", "fatigue," and "work." The modern Greek word meaning "easy" closest is eukolos, where the later part, kolos, means "cool". -- The word translated as "easier" is a compound word. It is an uncommon word, appearing only a seven  times in the NT and only five times in the rest of ancient Greek literature. The prefix here means "good" or "better" because the word is comparative. The base word primarily means "beating" or "fatigue". So the sense is "better fatigue", which has the sense of "less tiring".

eulogeo

Εὐλογημένος [4 verses](part sg perf pass nom) "Blessed" is from eulogeo, which means "speak well of", "praise". "honor", "bless", "praise" a god, by a Hebr. euphemism, "curse", and, as an adjective, "charmed", "lucky", and "blessed." -- "Blessed" is from a verb that means to "speak well of", "praise". and "honor". Amusingly, this is a Hebrew euphemism for "cursed", reversing its normal meaning. This is not the word used in the Beatitudes ("Blessed are the poor..."). It is in a past passive form of an adjective, "having been honored."

4
eunoeo

(1 verse]( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Agree" or "settle" could be eunoeo (εὐνοέω), which means "to be well-inclined", "to be favorable", "to be kindly", "to be friendly", "to be liked," and "to be affectionately treated." This form is both the present participle and the adjective. Or (part sg fut act masc nom) "Agree" could also be from eunao, meaning "to lay in ambush," "to lay or lull to sleep" and "to be bedded with." The "bedded with" takes a dative, which is the form of the next word. -- "Agree "is another verb Jesus only uses once. It could be the participle of two different verbs. the first means "to be well-inclined", and "to be friendly.""agreeing" or "befriending."  However, it is also a verb that means "to lay in ambush," "to lay or lull to sleep" and "to be bedded with." The "bedded with" takes a dative, which is the form of the next word translated as "adversary." The sense seems to combine the two word in a double entendre be "seducing" or "seductive."

eunouchizo

εὐνουχίσθησαν [1 verse](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Made eunuchs" is from a verb form of the word for eunuchs, eunouchizô, that is taken to mean "castrate," but which is only used here in the NT. The normal words for referring to castration are anorchos (without testicles), or alithos (without stones).  - The "have made...eunuchs" is the "eunuchize" verb again, but here it is in the form of an adjective, eunuchizing. However, this verb is a little strange in Greek because though it refers to eunuchs doing this to themselves, the verb isn't in that form, possibly because when it comes to making up verbs, this form was a bridge too far.

eunouchos

εὐνοῦχοι [1 verse](noun pl masc nom) "Eunuchs" is eunouchos, which "castrated person", "eunuch, and "(of dates) without stones." It means literally "bed watcher," that is, acting as a chamberlain, referring to the fact that castrated men were used as guards for woman's bedrooms.  - The word eunuch means literally a "bed watcher," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, doesn't mean physically castrated as much as "sexless." On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

euonymos

εὐωνύμων  [4 verses]( adj pl masc/fem/neut gen ) "Left hand" is euonymos, which means "of good name", "honored", "expressed in well-chosen terms", "prosperous," and "fortunate." It is a euphemism for "left", "on the left hand," and "bad omens." -- "Left" is an adjective that  means "of good name", "honored", "expressed in well-chosen terms", "prosperous," and "fortunate." It is a euphemism for "left", "on the left hand," and "bad omens."

euphraino

[uncommon] () "Be merry" is euphrainowhich means "cheer", "gladden", and in the passive, "make merry", "enjoy oneself". -- The Greek verb translated as  "be merry" means "cheer", "gladden", and in the passive, "make merry" and "enjoy oneself". It is used only in parables by Luke, most commonly in the parable of the prodigal son.

eurychoros

εὐρύχωρος [1 verse](adj sg fem nom ) "Broad" is eurychoros, which means "roomy", "wide," and, as a noun, "wide spaces."  -  The word translated as "broad" means "roomy" and "wide". This word is used only once by Jesus but it is used fifty times in the Greek OT. In Isa 33:21 it is used with the word above translated as "wide."

eutheos

εὐθέως [16 verses](adv)  "Immediately" is from eutheoswhich as an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once." -- "Immediately" is  an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

euthetos

[uncommon](adj sg masc nom) "Fit" is euthetoswhich means "well-arranged", "conveniently placed", "in a suitable place", "well-fitting", "ready for use", of persons "well=adapted", "quick", "able", and "fit and proper". -- The Greek word translated as "fit"  means "well-arranged", "conveniently placed", "in a suitable place", and of persons "well-adapted".  In English today, you would say "well-positioned" to capture the feeling of this word. 

exaireo

ἔξελε [2 verses](2nd sg aor imperat act) "Pluck...out" is exaireo, which means "to take out", "to remove from stock","to chose", "to carry off booty", "to have accepted", "to be set apart [for funds]", "to remove [people]", "to destroy", "to annul," and "to set free." It literally means "to choose from."  - - The Greek verb translated as "pluck..out" means literally to "choose out of," but its primary meaning is "to take out" with a strong secondary means of "to choose." Jesus only uses this word twice, in this verse, and the similar one at Matthew 5:29.  In referring to the "eye," it means both taking out the eye for yourself and choosing the best for yourself. The word is humorous in the way it is applied to a large range of situations. It is much like our phrase 'picking out," which can be applied to making a selecting and pulling out a splinter.

exanatello

ἐξανέτειλεν [2 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Sprung up" is exanatellô, which means "to cause to spring from" and "to spring up from." It is compound verb of the preposition ek ("out") and the verb anatello meaning "to rise" -- "Sprung up" is from a verb which means "to cause to spring from."

exerchomai

ἐξήλθατε [54 verses](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Went ye" is exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true." -- The word translated as "ye go thence" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true."

54
exesti

ἐξὸν [7 verses] (part sg pres act neut acc) "Is it lawful" is exesti, which means "to be allowed", "is possible," and "to be in one's power." -- "It is lawful" is a verb, which means "it is possible" and "it is allowed." It generally refers to something within someone's power, or, in this case with the negative, something outside of someone's power. This word does not, as it might seem, refer directly to Biblical law.

exetazo

ἐξετάσατε [1 verse](2nd pl aor imperat act) "Enquire" is exetazo, which means to "search out", "examine well or closely", "scrutinize", "review", "pass in review", "enumerate", "prove by scrutiny or test." -- "Enquire" is a word that has the sense of a more serious investigation than simply asking someone in passing. Christ only uses this word once, here.

exo

ἔξω [21 verses](adv) "Out" is exo, which means "out of a place", "outside", "external things," and "beyond a time." -- The word translated as "out" means "out of a place" and "outside."

exomologeo

Ἐξομολογοῦμαί [2 verses](1st sg pres ind mp ) "I thank " is from exomologeo, which means "to confess", "to admit," and "to acknowledge." Christ is not thanking God here but admitting a truth.  - The Greek word translated as "thank" really means "to confess", "to admit," and "to acknowledge." It is in the form where the subject is either being acted upon or acts on himself. Christ is confessing himself to God here, acknowledging something about himself.

exothen

ἔξωθεν [8 verses](adv) "Outwardly"is exothen, which "from without" and "outward." -- The word used for "outwardly" is the adverb meaning "outwardly" and "from without."

8
exousia

ἐξουσίαν [23 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Power" is exousia which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power." -- The term translated as "power" isn't the "power" of skill or energy but of authority, control, and the ability to choose.

gameo

γαμήσῃ [12 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj act) is from gameo, which mean "to marry" and "to take a wife." For a woman, it means "to give yourself in marriage." It can also mean to "take a lover. -- The word translated as "I have married" means, for a man, "to take a wife" and for a woman, to "give yourself in marriage."  It is not the past tense, but in a tense meaning something happening at some time. 

gamizo

γαμίζονται, [6 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind mp) "Given in marriage" is gamizo, which mean "to give a daughter in marriage."  - The verb translated as "given in marriage" is used nowhere else in Greek besides the NT. It is from the same root as the above "marry," the Greek noun that means "wedding." 

6
gamos

γάμους [10 verses](noun pl masc acc) " "Marriage" is from the from gamos, which means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock." -- "A wedding feast"  means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock." 

10
gar

γὰρ [205 verses](partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

205
gaster

γαστρὶ [3 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Child" is gaster, which means "paunch", "belly", "gluttony" with en, or "womb." With the verb "to have" and the preposition en, it usually means "big with child."

3
ge

γῆς [59 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Earth" is ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. -- The word translated as "earth" means "ground," "land," "country," and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Jesus describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

geenna

γέενναν: [11 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Hell" is geenna which is Greek for Gehenna, the valley of Hinnom (the Hebrew word), south of Jerusalem where trash, including diseased animals and human corpses was burned. A constant fire was kept burning there. -- The word "hell" is the name of an area, Gehenna, where a constant fire was kept for disposing of trash from Jerusalem. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, and Baal (Beelzebub, "lord of the flies"), Christ's personification of evil. See this article for more.

geiton

[uncommon](noun pl masc/fem acc) "Neighbors" is geiton, which means "neighbour", "borderer", "from or in the neighbourhood", and "be of like kind". -- The noun translated as "neighbor" means "neighbor" or "one of like kind". This is not the common word translated as "neighbor" in verses such as "love they neighbor". 

gemizo

Γεμίσατε [2 verses](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Fill" is gemizo, which means to "fill full of", "load", "freight", "stuff", "gorge", and "charge with".  - The word translated as "fill" means "fill full of", "load", "freight", "stuff", "gorge", and "charge with". The sense is filling or loading to capacity.

gemo

γέμουσιν [3 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "They are full" is gemo, which means "to be full" (especially referring to a ship), but generally as well), "to be full of" (w/gen), "to be filled with" (w/dat) and, of animals, "to be laden." ​

3
genea

Γενεὰ [19 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Generation" is genea, which means "race", "family", "generation", "class," and "kind." It is a form of the word from which we get the scientific word,"genus." -- The word translated as "generation" means "race", "family", and "generation". The sense is a "type" or a "specimen" of a particular type.   Jesus uses it to refer to a type of person, specifically those like the Pharisees. His first describes this type earlier in Matthew as children who insist that everyone dance to their tune. His favorite adjectives describing of this type is "evil and adulterous," which in Greek, is closer to "worthless and cheating." In one previous discussion of this type, he compares them unfavorably with the people of Nineveh reacting to Jonah, and the queen of Sheba reacting to Solomon. 

19
gennao

ἐγεννήθησαν [10 verse](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Born" is gennao, which means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", "to create," and "to engender." This is the causal form of gignomai, which is translated as "done" in the NT, but which comes closer in meaning to "become."  - "Born" is a word that means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", "to create," and "to engender."

gennema

γεννήματα [5 verses](noun pl neut voc) "O generation" is from gennema, which means "that which born or produced", "offspring", "fruits" (of the earth), generally, any "product" or "work", "breeding", "begetting," and "producing."  - "Generation" is from gennema, which means "that which born or produced", "offspring", "fruits" "breeding", "begetting," and "producing."

gennetos

γεννητοῖς [2 verses](adj pl masc dat) "Them that are born" is gennetos, which is an adjective that means "begotten", "engendered", "propagated," or "born." When used as a noun, we might translate it as "child", "progeny," or "offspring."  - "Born" is an adjective that means "begotten," or "born," and, as a noun, "offspring" or "progeny." Itis, however, plural, so "children" is the only English word that works. 

genos

γένος [3 verses]( noun sg neut nom) "Kind" is genos, which means "race", "offspring", "class", "sort," and "kind." -- (CW) "Kind" is from an uncommon noun for Jesus that means "race", "offspring", "class", "sort," and "kind." The female form of the noun is the word translated as "generation."

georgos

γεωργοὺς [13 verses](adj pl masc acc) "The husbandmen" is georgos, which means "tilling the ground," and from that, "husbandman", "vine dresser", "gardener," and "peasant."  - The word translated as "to husbandmen" means to those "tilling the ground," and from that, "vine dresser", "gardener," and "peasant."

geuomai

γεύσωνται [4 verses](verb 3rd pl aor subj mid) "Shall taste" is geuomai, which means "to taste," "to take food," "to make proof of," "to feel," and "to experience."  - "Shall taste" is a verb that means "to taste", "to feel," and "to experience."

ginomai

γενηθήτω [117 verses](verb 3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Is" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", of things "to be produced," of events "happen," "take place", "come to pass", "to be engaged in", math "to be multiplied into", "become one of", "turn into".and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi) which indicates existence in the same state. -- The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen" or "take place." For things, it can be "to be produced." When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something.

117
ginosko

γινωσκέτω:[62 verses] (verb 3rd sg pres imperat act)  "You know," is ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." -- "Be known" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

62
goneus

γονεῖς [4 verses] (noun pl masc nom/acc) "Parents" is goneus, which mean "progenitor" and can refer to parents or ancestors. -- "Parents" is a word that means "progenitor" and can refer to parents or ancestors.

gonia

γωνίαις [4 verses](adj pl fem dat) "The corners" is gonia, which means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people." --  "The corners" is a noun that means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

grammateus

γραμματεὺς [17 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Scribes" is grammateus, which is generally a "secretary," "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar," but specifically means someone who uses gramma which is Greek for "drawings", "a letter," (as in an alphabet)"diagrams," and "letters" (as in correspondence)."Scribes" is from a word that simply describes to people who write or record information. They were not "writers" in the sense of writing their own views, but recorders and registrars, record keepers who wrote official information. In this case, they were probably those who copied Jewish scripture and wisdom. Not all of this was Biblical, much of it was probably what is now part of the Talamud.

17
graphe

γραφαῖς [13 verses](noun pl fem dat) "Scriptures" is graphe, which means "representing by means of lines", "a drawing", "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." -- "The scripture" is a Greek noun that means  "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." It came to mean "scripture" from its use in the Gospels.

13
grapho

γέγραπται [34 verses](3rd sg perf ind mp) "It is written" is grapho which means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", "to proscribe", "to ordain", "to write for oneself", "to enroll oneself", "to draw signs", "to describe a figure" "to brand," and "to indict." -- "Write" is the Greek verb that  means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", and so on.

34
gregoreo

γρηγορεῖτε [14 verses] (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Watch" is from gregoreo, which means "to become fully awake," and "to watch." -- "Watch" is from a verb that means "to be or to become fully awake." In English, we would say "wake up" to someone sleeping and "stay awake" to someone already awake. In the last few chapters, the original Greek focuses on the idea of being awake and ready. In English, this is lost because the term for awake is often translated as "watch."

14
gyne

γυναικῶν [28 verses](noun pl fem gen) "Woman" is gyne, which means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." -- The word translated as "woman" is  the Greek word that means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." It is closer to our "female." 

hades

ᾄδου [3 verses](noun sg masc gen ) "Hell" is from hades, the Greek term for the netherworld. It is a place of departed spirits. It is also a synonym for "death."  - "Hell" is the Greek concept of the land of departed spirits. It is the name of Pluto, the god of the underworld and used for the netherworld. Interesting, this is the first time that this world is used in Matthew. The term often translated as "hell" prior to this in Matthew has been genna (Gehenna), the burning trash dump outside of Jerusalem. See this article on the words for "hell".  

hagiazo

ἁγιάσας [6 verses] (part sg aor act masc nom) "Hallowed " it is hagiazo, which means "to separate from profane things and dedicate to God", "to dedicate people to God", "to purify," and "to cleanse externally or internally." This may be a special form of hagizo which means "to hallow", "to dedicate," and "to make sacred," commonly by burning a sacrifice. It may also be a verb from of the noun hagos, which means "a thing that creates awe." -- It is perhaps, an unusual form of another Greek verb meaning "to dedicate to God" and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In may also be a verb form of a Greek noun, meaning "a thing that creates awe." In a good sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God.

6
hagios

ἁγίου,[18 verses] (adj sg neut gen) "Holy" is hagios, which means "devoted to the gods", "pure", "holy," and on the negative side "accursed." -- The Greek word translated as "holy" means "dedicated to the divine", which itself means both "pure" since things dedicated to God were first purified and "accursed" since using such things for your own purposes carried a punishment. 

18
haima

αἷμα [12 verses](noun sg fem nom) "The blood" is haima, which means "blood," "streams of blood", "anything like blood," "spirit", "courage", "bloodshed", "murder", "blood relationship,"kin," and "kindship." -- "Blood" is the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

halas

ἅλας [3 verses](noun sg neut nom) "Salt" is halas which means "salt", "salt-rock", "brine," and is a metaphor for "sales" and "wit."  - -- "Salt" means "salt", "salt-rock", "brine," and is a metaphor for "sales" and "wit." Salt was used as money to pay wages. Our word "salary" comes from the Roman word for salt. Salt was also the most common preservative for food.

halizo

λισθήσεται;[2 verses] (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Salted" is halizo, which has two separate meanings, "to salt," as in salting food, and "to gather together," "to collect [pieces]," and "to meet together (passive)." The passive form of the "salted" form only typically applies to sheep, that is, putting out salt for them. It is used in the Septuagint ( Exo 30:35, Lev 2:13, Isa 51:6, Eze 16:4 ) to translate the Hebrew malach, which is translated as "to be rubbed with salt," "to be tempered," and "to be dissipated."  - The word translated as "made salty" is another play on words, and, as usual, one that only works in Greek. The Greek verb means "to salt" but it is the passive, future tense. The passive form is usually only used for putting out salt for sheep. However, this Greek verb is used to translated a Hebrew word that means "to be rubbed with salt" and "to dissipate." The "be rubbed with salt" use in the OT is primarily to purify meat for sacrifice but also to its role in tempering blades, but the most common use of salting meat, then and now, was to preserve meat. So the sense is "will it be salted for preservation".

hama

ἅμα [2 verses](adverb/prep) Untranslated is hama, which means "at the same time", "at once", " together," and as a preposition, "at the same time with" and "together with." - An untranslated word here means "at once" or "together."

hamartanô

ἁμαρτήσῃ [7 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Trespass" is from hamartanô, which means "to miss the mark", "to fail in one's purpose", "to err", "to be mistaken," and "to neglect." -- "Trespass" is from the verb which means "to miss the mark", "to fail in one's purpose", "to err", "to be mistaken," and "to neglect." See this article about "sin" for more detail.

hamartia

ἁμαρτίας [28 verses](noun pl fem acc )"Sin" is hamartia, which means "missing the mark", "failure", "fault," and "error." Only in religious uses does it become "guilt" and "sin." -- The word translated as "sin" means "missing the mark", "failure", "fault," and "error." Only in religious uses does it become "guilt" and "sin," having no sense of doing malicious evil in Greek. The best English translation is "mistakes" or "failures" rather than what we commonly think of as the evils of "sin." See this article for more information and context.

28
hamartolos

ἁμαρτωλούς. [15 verses](adj pl masc/fem acc ) "Sinners" is hamartolos, which means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. -- "Sinners" is word that means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. Only in biblical translations is this term given the sense of wickedness. More about the translation issues regarding "sin" here.

hapalo

ἁπαλὸς [2 verses] (adj sg masc nom) "Tender" is hapalos, which means "soft to the touch", "tender," and "delicate."  - The word translated as "tender" also means "soft to the touch", and "delicate." This section of verses generally contrasts the hard, cold, and dark with the soft, warm, and light.

2
hapas

ἁπάντων. [4 verses]](adj pl neut gen) "Of all" is from hapas, which means "quite all", "the whole", "all together", "all possible", "absolute", "every one", "everything", "every", "in any cause whatever", "in every matter," and (as an adverb) "altogether."  It is the common word for "all," -pas, preceded by a prefix ha- that means "the same,"  -- The term translated as "of all" includes several senses of "everything," "all possible," and "everything." Jesus only uses it four times,

4
harpage

ἁρπαγῆς [2 verses](noun sg fem gen)"Extortion" is harpage, which means "seizure", "robbery", "rape", "the thing seized", "booty", "prey," and "greediness,"

2
harpax

ἅρπαγες. [2 verses](noun pl masc nom ) "Ravening" is harpax, which means "robbing", "rapacious," "rapine", "robber", "peculator", "a type of wolf", "grappling-iron," and "meat hook."  - Surprisingly, the word translated as "ravening" also means a "grappling hook" and "a type of wolf," but its primary meaning is robbing and other forms of theft.

harpazo

ἁρπάζουσιν [6 verses](3rd pl pres ind act) "Take...by force" is from the Greek harpazô, which means to "snatch away", "seize hastily, " "snatch up", "overpower, " "overmaster", "grasp with the senses", "plunder," "carry off," and "be a robber."  - "Catch" is a verb that means "to snatch away", "to carry off", "to overpower," and "to plunder." It is in the present tense. This is not an uncommon word for Christ to use. Everywhere else it is translated as "snatch", "seize" or "catch." 

heautou

ἑαυτῆς [75 verses](adj sg fem gen) "Himself" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos. -- "Himself" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. " When used in the possessive, it has the sense of "his own."

75
hedyosmon

ἡδύοσμον [2 verses] (adj sg neut acc) "Mint" is hedyosmon, which means "sweet-smelling," "fragrant," and, as a noun, "green mint."

2
hegemon

ἡγεμόνας [3 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Governors" is hegemon, which means "one who leads", "leader", "commander", "chief," and "one who does a thing first." The term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times. -- "Governors" is the Greek for a leader of any kind, but the term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times.

heis

ἕνα [94 verses](noun sg masc acc) "One""One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.  -- The Greek word translated as "one " means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

hekastos

ἕκαστον  [9 verses] (adj sg masc acc) "Every" is from hekastos, which means "each", "all and each severally," and "each by himself." -- The Greek word translated as "every"  means "each", "all and each severally," and "each by himself."

hekaton

ἑκατὸν [10 verses](numeral) "An hundredfold" is from hekaton, which is the number "a hundred."  - This is the number "a hundred."

heko

ἥξει [11 verses](3rd sg fut ind act or 3rd sg aor subj act) "Shall come" is heko, which means "to arrive", "to have come", "to be present", "to have reached a point, "to pass though a point (geometry)", "to have come back", "returned", "to have come to table", "concern", "relate to", "to depend upon," and, as a metaphor, "to be a follower." -- (CW) The word translated as "shall come" is a complicated one because it indicates a "coming" that has been completed, that is, "to arrive" or, even, "to be present." As a metaphor, it means "to be a follower." Jesus seems to use it more often to mean "return."

hektos

ἕκτην [1 verse](adj sg fem acc) "Sixth," is hektos which means "sixth."

helikia

ἡλικίαν [2 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Stature" is helikia, which means "time of life", "age," "the prime of life", "manhood" or "maidenhood", "youthful passion", "those of the same age", "comrades", "time", "generation," and "stature [height as a sign of age]." -- The word translated as "stature" is primarily concerned with age and time. It only means "stature" in the sense that people grow up and attain their full stature as grown-ups. It doesn't mean "stature" any more than "grown-up" refers to height.

helios

ἥλιον [8 verses](noun sg masc acc ) "Sun" is helios, which means the "sun", "life", "day", "sunshine", "the sun's heat", "brightness," and the sun-god. -- The Greek word for "sun," also means "sunshine" and, more generally, "brightness." Brightness is Christ's metaphor for intelligence. Light is his metaphor for knowledge.

2
helko

() "Draw" is helko, which means "to draw", "to drag", "to draw after one", "to tear to pieces", "to worry," [metaphorically] "to carp at", "to draw [a sword or box]", "to tow [a ship]", "to drag [into court]", "to suck up", "to drag out", "to draw to oneself", "to attract", "to draw [from a source]", "to tear out [one's hair]", "to be wretched", "to scrape up", "to amass," and "to be drawn [at a pace]."

hemas

ἡμᾶς [7 verse](pron 1st pl masc/fem acc) "Us" is hemas, which is "us," the 1st person, plural, accusative pronoun. - "Us" is the 1st person, plural, accusative pronoun. Jesus only uses this pronoun in seven verses this pronoun seven times, most often in the Lord's Prayer.

hemeis

ἡμεῖς [10 verses](pron 1st pl masc nom) "We" is from hemeis, the first person plural pronoun, "we", "us". - (WF) This is from the first-person, plural  pronoun. Since this information is part of the verb, the pronoun is only used to emphasize it as we might say "we ourselves" in English.

hemera

ἡμέρας [96 verses](noun fem pl acc) "Days" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." -- The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

96
hemin

ἡμῖν [15 verses](pron 1st pl masc/fem dat) "Us" is from hemin, which is the first person plural dative pronoun, "to us." - "To us" is the first person plural pronoun, "we", "us" as an indirect object.

15
hemon

ἡμῶν [16 verses](pro 1st pl gen) "Our" is hemon, which is the plural possessive (genitive) form of the first-personal pronoun. -- The "our" is the plural possessive first-person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of ours."

16
hendekatos

ἑνδεκάτην [2 verses](adj sg fem acc) "Eleventh" is hendekatos, which means "eleventh."  - The text doesn't have the word "hour" in it. It says simply "eleventh." The eleventh hour was one hour before sunset, the end of the workday.

heneka

ἕνεκεν [17 verses](prep ) "For" is heneka, whichis part of the preposition that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." This preposition is usually paired with the noun "sake" in English. -- This preposition  means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." This preposition is usually paired with the noun "sake" in English. The word translated as "sake" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

heos

ἕως [63 verses](conj) "While" is heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that." -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."   With the particle of possibility and the subjunctive form of the verb, the sense is until some unknown time.

hepta

ἑπτὰ [5 verses](number) "Seven" is from hepta, which means "seven," and was considered a mystical number by the Greeks.  - "Seven" is from number seven. This verse may be the source of the idea of "seven deadly sins". 

heptakis

ἑπτάκις [2 verses](adv) "Seven times" is heptakis, which means "seven times."  - The "seven times" is a single word that means "seven times" in Greek.

hetairos

Ἑταῖρε, [3 verses](noun sg masc voc) "Friend" is hetairos, which means "comrade," "companion", "pupil," "disciple," of political "partisans", "members of a religious guild," and "courtesan."  - "Friend" is from a noun that means "comrade," "companion", "pupil," "disciple," of political "partisans", "members of a religious guild," and "courtesan." However, Jesus only uses it ironically. He uses it three times, twice in parables, addressing a person creating a problem, and once in real life, addressing Judas when he betrays him.

heteros

ἕτερα (adj pl neut acc) "Another" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly." -- The word translated as "another" means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun.

hetoimazo

ἡτοίμασται [13 verses] (verb 3rd sg perf ind mp) "It is prepared" is from hetoimazo, which means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare." -- The verb translated as "I have prepared" means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare." It is in a form that indicates the action has been completed.

hetoimos

ἕτοιμοι, [8 verses](adj pl masc/fem nom) "Ready" is hetoimos, which means "at hand", "ready", "prepared", of persons, "ready", "active", "zealous," of the mind, "ready", "bold," and as an adverb, "readily", "willingly."

8
heurisko

εὑρήσει [43 verses](3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall find" is heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain." -- The term used for "find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

hexekonta

ἑξήκοντα [4 verses] (numeral) "Sixtyfold" is hexekonta, which means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."  - This Greek word means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."

hexekonta

τριάκοντα.  [4 verses] (numeral) "Thirtyfold" is from triakonta which means "thirty." == "Thirtyfold" is the word that means "thirty."

hiereus

ἱερεῦσιν [8 verses](noun pl masc dat) "Priest" is from hiereus, which means "priest", "sacrificer," and "diviner." -- The Greek noun translated as "priest" means "priest", "sacrificer," and "diviner." -

hieron

ἱερῷ [7 verses](adj sg masc dat) "The temple" is from hieron, means which means "filled with or manifesting divine power", "holy," "consecrated", "under divine protection", "holy place", "sacred principle," and "supernatural." It is related to the word used for "priest." Both come from the word hieros, which means "super-human", "mighty", "divine", "wonderful" and "holy."  - "The temple" is a word related to the one above, from the same root, which means literally "holy place" or "temple." Both come from the root word, which means "super-human", "mighty", "divine", "wonderful" and "holy." This makes "holy man" a "wonderful man" and a "holy place," a "wonderful place."

himation

ἱμάτιον [10 verses](noun sg neut acc)"Garment" is himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth." -- The word translated as "garment" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status.

10
hina

ἵνα [134 verses](adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when",  but when beginning a phrase "that", "in order that", "when," and "because." -- The word translated as "that" is an adverb "in that place", "there", "where", "when", or as a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause  "that," "in order that" or "because."

134
histemi

σταθήσεται. [28 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall...stand" is histemi, which means "to make to stand", , "to set up", "to bring to a standstill", "to check", "to appoint", "to establish", "to set upright", "to erected","to fix by agreement", and "to place." In the passive, it means "to be placed", "to be set", "to stand," "to stand still", "to stand firm", "to arise." -- The verb translated as "shall stand" means "to make stand", "to set up", "to establish and similar words in the active form. In the passive, it means "to be placed," "to stand," and "to stand firm."  Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

hode

ὧδε [29 verses] (adv) "In hither" is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here." = The word translated as "in hither" means in manner, "in this way," referring to the manner, or "here," referring to place.

hodegeo

ὁδηγῇ, [3 verses](verb 3rd sg pres subj act or verb 2nd sg pres ind mp) "Lead" is the verb hodêgeô, which means "to lead one upon his way," and "to guide." These concepts were also used for those who helped those ignorant of a given area.  - The word translated as "lead" is the verb form of the noun "leaders" used before. It means "to lead one upon his way," and "to guide." These concepts were also used for those who helped those ignorant of a given area.

hodegos

ὁδηγοί: [3 verses](noun pl masc nom) "Leaders" is from hodegos, which means "guide" and "pilot."  - "Leaders" is a noun, which means "guide." It is in the form of a subject of the sentence and immediately follows the verb "to be."

hodos

ὁδὸς [27 verses](noun sg fem nom ) "Way" is hodos, which means literally "way" or "road" but it also means "travel" and "journey."  It is interesting that a term joining a path with philosophy exists in many languages from the west to the east. -- "Way" is from a word meaning "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." In Acts, followers of Jesus are described as those "belonging to the way".

27
hoios

οἵα [2 verses](adj sg fem nom ) "Such as" is hoios, which means "such as", "of what sort", "so and so'" "fit", "able", "as", "just as", "for instance", "that is to say", "as it were", and "so to speak."

2
holos

ὅλον. [23 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Whole" is holos, which means "the whole", "entire", "complete", "complete in all its parts" and "the universe". As an adverb, it means "wholly", "altogether", "entirely", "on the whole", "speaking generally", "utter," "actually", and "really". -- The word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole." It is used as an adverb, which can mean "wholly", "really", "entirely", or "generally speaking."

homoioo

ὁμοιωθῆτε [12 verses](2nd pl aor subj pass) "Be...like" is homoioo, which means "to make like", "to become like", "to liken," and "to compare. -- The verb translated as "be...like" is a verb that means "to make like" and, in the passive, as used here, "to become like."

12
homoios

Ὁμοία [29 verses](adj pl neut acc) "Like" is homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally." -- The word translated as "like" is an adjective that means "like", "resembling," and "matching."

homologeo

ὁμολογήσω [3 verses](1st sg fut ind act) "Will I profess" is homologeo, which means "to agree with," "to say the same thing as", "to correspond," "to have to do with", "to be coordinated", "to be suitable for", "to agree to a thing," :"to grant", "to concede", "to acknowledge,"to promise to", "to come to terms", "not to deny," and "to praise." Literally, it means "to say the same." -- "Confess" is a word which means "to agree with" and "to say the same as another."

homos,

ὤμους [2 verses] (noun pl masc acc) "Shoulders" is homos, which means "the shoulder with the upper arm," "the shoulder", "the parts below the top or head of any thing," esp. of the fork of a vine, and "the womb."  - The Greek word "shoulders" means the "shoulder and upper arm" together, but it is used more generally like the word "shoulder" in English.

2
hopos

ὅπως [14 verses](conj) "That" is hopos, which is a conjunction that means "in such a manner as", "in order that", "in the manner in which", "how," [with negative] "there is no way that," and [in questions] "in what way." -- The word translated as "that" is one of those Greek words that introduce a new phrase that offers an explanation. It can be translated as a dependent clause, but if we start a new sentence with it, we get fewer run-on sentences.

4
hopou

 ὅπου [32 verses] (adv/conj) "Where" is hopou, which means "somewhere", "anywhere", "wherever," and "where." -- The word translated as "where"  means "somewhere", "anywhere", "wherever," and "where."

32
hora

ὥρα [37 verses](noun sg fem nom ) "Hour" is hora, which means "any period", "season," (especially springtime), "year' (generally), "climate" (as determined by seasons), "duration", "the twelve equal parts into which the period of daylight was divided", "the fitting time" (for a task).  - The word translated as "hour" means a period of time equal to the one-twelfth part of the daylight, like an "hour."

37
horama

ὅραμα [1 verse](noun sg neut nom/acc) "Vision" is horama, which means "a sight", "a visible object", "a spectacle", "a vision," and "a dream."  - "Vision" is from a noun that means "a sight", "a visible object", "a spectacle", "a vision," and "a dream."

horao

Ὁρᾶτε [20 verses](verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Take heed" is from horao, which means "to see with the eyes", "to look", "to observe," "see", "aim", "have sight", "behold", "keep in sight," and as a metaphor of mental sight, "discern," and "perceive." -- (CW) "See" is from a Greek verb, which means "to see with the eyes", "to look," and "to observe." It is a metaphor for mental seeing, that is, perceiving. However, it is one of the many words that Christ uses to mean "see," but it is not one of the most common ones. Jesus seems to use this word often to mean "watch out" or "look out" as a warning.

horkos

() "Oaths" is horkos, which means "the object by which one swears", "oath", "sworn compact," and Horkos, the divinity who punishes the perjurer.

hos

τῷ [692 verses](article sg neut dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

τῷ [692 verses] (article sg neut dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which, when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

οὗ [294 verses](pron sg neut gen ) This" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

ὡς 167 verses](adv/conj) "How" is hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." -- The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

692
hosautos

ὡσαύτως. [5 verses](adv) "Likewise' is from hosautoswhich an adverb that means "in like manner," and "just so." It is literally "this the same."  - The adverb translated as "likewise" means "in like manner," and "just so." It is literally "this the same." There is a more common way of saying "likewise", but Jesus seems to use this one to emphasize repeated actions so it is used here to describe a repeated line. 

hosei

[uncommon] (adv)  Untranslated is hosei, which means "as if", "as though" and, with various measures, "about". -- An untranslated (in the KJV) word appears here in the Greek meaning "about". 

hosos

ὅσα [28 verses](adj pl neut acc) "Whatsoever" is hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as." -- The word translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as", "as much as," and similar ideas of comparison.

hosper

ὥσπερ [13 verses](adv/prep) "As" is hosper, which means "the very man who", "the very thing, which", "the same as", "wherefore," and "although." -- The Greek word translated as "as" indicates a match with a person or thing, "the very thing, which", "the same as."

hoste

ὥστε [9 verses](adv/conj) "Wherefore" is hoste, which marks the power or virtue by which one does a thing, "as being", "inasmuch as," expresses the actual or intended result of the action in the principal clause: "as", "for," implying " on condition that," at the beginning of a sentence, to mark a strong conclusion, "and so", "therefore," and with subj. " in order that." Before an infinitive verb, the sense is "for" or "so as" to do something. -- "So that" is an adverb that marks the power or virtue by which one does a thing. At the beginning of a sentence, it marks a strong conclusion. Before an infinitive verb, the purpose, "so as" to do that thing.

9
hostis

ὅστις [90 verses](pron sg masc nom) "That" is hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

90
hotan

ὅταν [70 verses](adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)." -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

70
hote

ὅτε [19 verses](adv/conj) "Then" is hote, which means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes." - "Then" is from an adverb/conjunction that means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

hothen

ὅθεν [4 verses](adv) "From whence" is from hothen, which means "whence," "from whom or which", "from whatever source", "in what manner soever", "from any other place whatsoever", "where or whither", "whence, "for which reason," and "for what reason."  - "From whence" is an adverb that means "whence," "from whom or which", "from whatever source", and so on. It is used only four times by Jesus.

hoti

ὅτι [332 verses](adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

332
houtos

οὗτός [137 verses](adj sg masc nom) "This" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why." There are two other common forms, the genitive toutou, [51 verses] and the accusative, touto, [93 verses]. -- "This" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." -- The word translated in KJV as "thus" is in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

137
huios

υἱὸς [158 verses](noun sg masc nom​) "The Son" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

humas

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural obejective form of the second-person pronoun, "you." -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.

210
humin

ὑμῖν [289 verses](pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

humon

ὑμῶν [168 verses](pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

168
hupantesis

ὑπάντησιν [1 verse] (noun sg fem acc) "To meet" is from hupantesis, which means "coming to meet", "encounter", and metaphorically, "retort", and "answer."  - The Greek word translated as "to meet" is not a verb. It is a noun with the sense of a "coming to meet," "rendezvous" or an "encounter."

1
huparcho

ὑπάρχοντα [7 verses](part pl pres act neut acc) "What you have" is hyparchonta, which is the past participle noun form of huparcho, which means "to take the initiative", "to begin",and "to already be in existence", As a participle, it means, "that which is in existence," and "the past record."  -  "That...hast" is a verb that means "to already be in existence". It is in the form of a verbal adjective used as a noun, "the things already in existence".   In the neutral, plural, past participle, as it is here, it means "existing circumstances"," present advantages," "according to one's means," "possessions," and "resources." The effect is primarily humorous. Perhaps "accumulations" works best to capture this in English. 

huparchonta

ὑπάρχουσιν [3 verses](part pl pres act neut dat) "Goods" is from huparchonta, (hyparchô), which means "to take the initiative", "to begin," "to be the beginning," "to be already in existence," "to be laid down," "to be taken for granted," "belong to," "fall to one," "accrue," of persons "to be devoted to", and, as a present participle, "existing circumstances", "present advantages", "possessions", and "resources." -- The verb translated as "goods" means, "to take the initiative", "to begin," "to be already in existence," "to belong to," and of persons "to be devoted to". It is in the form of an adjective ("beginning", "existing already", "belonging to") used as a noun, "the things beginning", "the things existing", and "the things belonging to".

3
hupodema

() "Shoes" is hupodema, which means "a sole bound under the foot with straps," and "a sandal." -- "Shoes" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

hydor

ὕδατος [12 verses](noun sg neut gen)  "The water" is hydor, which means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters. -- "Water" is the noun that means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

hydria

ὑδρίας [1 verse](noun pl fem acc) The word is hydria, which means "water pot," "pitcher," "vessel," and even "money pot."   - "Waterpots"  is from a feminine form of the neuter word "water,"which means "water pot," "pitcher," "vessel," and even "money pot." Jesus only uses it once.

hymeis

ὑμεῖς [92 verses](pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you." -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

hymin

ὑμῖν. (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. --  The "you" here is from the plural, dative, second-person pronoun.

hypago

ὕπαγε [47 verses](2nd sg pres imperat) "I go" is hypago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go your way" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

hyper

ὑπὲρ [17 verses](prep) "On our part" is hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure." -- "For" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond", "concerning," "on behalf of,"  and "instead of" with many other specific uses.

17
hyperetes

() "The officer" is hyperetes, which means "rower", "underling", "servant", "attendant", "subordinate," and "aides-de-camp."

hypo

ὑπὸ [29 verses](prep) "Of" is hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," "by" in the sense of a cause or agency, "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause). -- The word translated as "of" primarily means "by", "under," or "with". Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

hypokato

ὑποκάτω [5 times](adv/prep) "Under" is hypokato, which means "below" and  "under". -- The word translated as "under" primarily means "by", "under," or "with". Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

5
hypokrisis

ὑποκρίσεως [2 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Hypocrisy" is hypokrisis, which means "reply", "answer", "playing a part" and "outward show." As an adverb, "after the manner of."

2
hypokrites

ὑποκριταὶ [18 verses](noun pl masc nom) "Hypocrites" is hypokrites, which means "an interpreter", "an actor", "a stage player," and "a dissembler." -- (UW) The Greek for "the hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. The primary meaning during Christ's era was "an actor." See this article on the word and its wordplay.  Interestingly enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality. Its literal meaning is "beneath separation," which describes the separation between fact and fiction, real action versus pretended action.

18
hypomeno

ὑπομείνας [3 verses](part sg aor act masc nom ) "Shall endureth" is hypomeno, which means "stay behind", "await", "bide", "stand one's ground", "stay firm," and "dare to do."- The Greek word translated as "shall endureth" means "one staying behind", "one awaiting," or "one standing firm." It's literal meaning is "remain under."

3
hypopodion

[2 verses](noun sg neut nom) "Footstool" is from hypopodion (ὑποπόδιόν ), which means "footstool" and "to reduce under one''s feet." It was the practice of conquerors to place their feet on their conquered enemies' necks. -- -- The Greek word translated as "footstool" has one meaning as something that goes "under feet," which is its literal meaning. It is the subject of the phrase.  Jesusly uses this word twice. It has no article before it, nor a "his" modifying it, so the sense is that the planet is "a footstool" not "the footstool."

hypsoo

ὑψωθήσῃ;  [8 verses](2nd sg fut ind pass) "Be lifted up" is hypsoo (hupsoo), which means "to lift high", "to raise up." It is a metaphor for "to elevate" and "to exalt." -- The word translated as "shall exhalt" is from a verb that means "to lift high", "to raise up." It is a metaphor for "to elevate" and "to exalt." It is in the future tense. Christ uses several words to mean "lift" or "raise" up but he uses this one primarily when making a play on words.

hysteros

ὕστερον [5 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Afterwards" is hysteros (husteros), which means "latter", "last", "coming after", "after" (in Time), "posterior", "inferior", and "extremely." -- -- The word translated as "afterward," means "latter", "last", "coming after", "after" (in Time), "posterior", "inferior", and "extremely." It is technically an adjective, but it works like an adjective.

Iakob

Ἰακώβ; [5 verses] (Proper noun) "Jacob" is from Iakob.  - "Jacob" is from the Greek spelling of the partiarch's name.

5
iatros

ἰατροῦ [3 verses](noun sg masc gen)"Physician" is iatros, which means "one who heals", "medic", "surgeon," or "midwife." -- The word translated as "physician" generally means "one who heals."

ichthys

ἰχθὺν [3 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Fish" is ichthys, which means "fish" and, in the plural, "fish market." -- "Fish," as a protein, was a luxury in Christ's era compared with bread. It also later became a metaphor for Christ, but only because of its spelling was a code for Christ's name.

idios

ἴδιον [16 verses](adj sg masc acc) "His" is idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual." -- The word translated as "his" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

16
idou

Ἰδοὺ [52 verses](adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see." -- "Behold" is a verbal command meaning "See!" and "Look!" It is from the most common word meaning "to see" in Greek. In a humorous vein, it is also an adverbial exclamation like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or "voila" in French. "Look!" or "See!" comes closest in English. Jesus uses it both ways.

52
Ierousalēm

Ἰεροσόλυμα, [15 verses](Aramaic noun) "Jerusalem" is Ierousalēmwhich is a form of word that denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms, this form and Hierosolyma, appear in the NT. -- The word "Jerusalem" denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms of this word appear in the NT. It is only used once in Mark, but not in Jesus's words. It isn't used at all in John. It appears three times in  Jesus's words in Matthew. This version is used most heavily in Luke, mostly in his narration, but a few times in Jesus's words. It seems to be the more formally Greek version of the name.

Ioannes

Ἰωάνου [17 verses](noun sg masc gen)e "John" is from Ioannes, which is the Greek form of the name "John." --  "John" is the Greek word translated as the English proper name. 

Ionas

Ἰωνᾶ -- [8 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Jonas" is from Ionas, the Greek word for the OT prophet Jonah. -"Jonas" is from the Greek spelling of the proper name "Jonah."

iota

() "Jot" is iota, which means the Greek letter iota, "line", "stroke," and anything very small.

Ioudai

Ἰουδαίᾳ [5 verses](adj sg fem dat) "Judea" is Ioudaia, which means "a Jew", "Jewish", "Judea," or "Jewish."  - "Judea" is translated from a Greek word that means "a Jew", "Jewish", "Judea," or "Jewish." Judea represents civilization.

Isaak

Ἰσαὰκ [5 verses] (Hebrew name) "Isaac" is from Isaak.- "Isaac" is from the Greek spelling of the patriarch's name.

5
isaggelos

ἰσάγγελοι [1 verse]( adj pl masc nom) "Equal unto angels" is isaggelos, which means "like an angel". It is an invented word from isos, which means "equal" in size, strength, number, or rights and aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys".  This word is found nowhere else in ancient Greek, used only to describe people awakened from death. It is just a coincidence that it resembles "is angels" in English. If you believe in coincidences.

ischuo

ἰσχύει [4 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "It is good" is ischuo, which means "to be strong", "to be powerful", "to prevail", "to be worth," and "to be equivalent to."  - -- The verb translated as "it is good" means "It is strong." The phrase is not from the verb "is" with the adjective "good." This has to be expressed as a verbal phrase because to verb in English means "be strong." This verb means "to be strong in body", "to be powerful," or "to be worth." Christ uses it primarily to mean "strong in body."

ischuros

ἰσχυρόν[2 verses](adj sg masc acc) "The strong man" is ischuros, which means, as an adjective, "strong", "mighty," and "powerful," "forcible", "violent", "severe", "excessive," and, as an adverb, "strongly, with all force, very much, exceedingly, from ischus, meaning "strength."  - "A strong man's" is from an adjective used as a possessive noun. It means "strong", "mighty," and "violent." So it means "of a strong one" or "of a violent one."

ischyo

ἰσχύοντες [8 verses](part pl pres act masc nom) "Whole" is ischyo, which means "to be strong", "to be powerful", "to prevail", "to be worth," and "to be equivalent to." -- The word translated as "whole" is a verb that means "to be strong", "to be able," or "to have powerful." It is the present plural participle of verb, used as the sentence's subject.

ischyros

(adj sg fem nom ) "Mighty" is  ischyros, which means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful." It is from ischys, meaning strength. Here is seems as though it is used to refer to demons that control people. -- "Mighty" is an adjective that means "strong", "mighty," and "violent." So it means "a strong one" or "the violent one."

isos

ἴσους [4 verses](adj pl masc acc) "Equal" is isos, which means "equal" in size, strength, number, or rights; of persons, "fair," "impartial"; of ground, "even," "flat"; generally, "just", "fair." It is also used to mean an "equal share" or "equally distributed." -- Equal" is  means "equal" in size, strength, number, or rights; of persons, "fair," "impartial"; of ground, "even," "flat"; generally, "just", "fair." It is also used to mean an "equal share" or "equally distributed." Jesus only uses this word four times.

Israel

Ἰσραήλ. [11 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Israel" is Israel, which means "Israel." -- The word translated as "Israel" comes from the Hebrew, not the Greek.

Israelites

Ἰσραηλείτης [1 verse](noun sg masc acc) "Israelite" is from the Greek word Israelites, which means "Israelite."  - - The Greek word is the source of the English word, but originally from Hebrew. The Greek word is spelled the same but with Greek noun endings. Jesus only uses this word once.

kago

κἀγὼ [31 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom ) "And...I" is kago, a contraction of kai-ego. "And" is kai-, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "I" is -ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

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kai

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

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kailmia

κειμένη: [2 verses] (part sg pres mp fem nom) "Set" is kailmia, which means "to lie down to rest", "to lie dead", "to be situated", "to lie", "to store", "to be placed in a position", "to lay down an argument," and "to remain."  - -- The word translated as "set" means "lying down to rest" or "lying dead." "of places, it means it mean "to lie" or "be situated." The verb could be passive but it could also be the middle voice where the subject acts on, by, or for itself.

kainos

καινούς, [9 verses](adj pl masc acc) "New" is kainos, which means "new", "fresh", "newly made", "newly invented," and "novel." -- The word translated as "new" is different than the common Greek word for new. Many of their meanings overlap, but this word also means "of a new kind."

kaio

καίουσιν [4 verses](3rd pl pres ind act) "Light" is kaio, which means "to kindle", "to set on fire", "to burn," and "to bake pottery." -- The Greek term translated as "light" means "to kindle", "to set on fire", "to burn," and "to bake pottery."

kairos

καιρῷ [21 verses](noun sg masc dat) "Due season" is kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit." -- "The time" is a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

Kaisar

Καίσαρος [3 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Caesar" is Kaisar, which means "Caesar" primarily Julius but also Augustus and, generally, "the emperor."

3
kakei

κἀκεῖ [3 verses](adv) "And there" is kakei (κἀκεῖ), which is a contraction of kai ekei that means "and there", "and in that place", "and what is or happens there", "and events there", "and then [rarely of time]," and "andin an intelligible world." -- "And there" is translated from a Greek contraction meaning "and there" and "and then,"  but in logic means "and in the intelligible world."

κἀκεῖ  [3 verses](verb 2nd sg pres ind mp) of akeomai (ἀκέομαι) , which means "to heal", "to cure", "to mend", "to repair" and "make amends."

κἀκεῖ  [3 verses](noun sg neut dat) akos, which means "a cure" or "a remedy." In the NT it is translated as "against my will."

kakeinos

κἀκεῖνα (adj pl neut nom) "That" is kakeinos, which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", and, in the form of an adverb, "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." -- The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."

kakia

κακία [1 verse](noun sg fem nom) "Evil" is from kakia, which means "badness in quality", "incapacity", "defects", "cowardice", "faint-heartedness", "moral badness", "vice", "ill-repute", "dishonor", "hurt", "damage done or suffered," “wicked,” “slanderous,” and “cowardly. The term used for evil here can mean our own concept of moral evil, but it also means "defects", and "bad quality". This is not the usual term that the Bible translates as "evil" which means "second-rate" and "burdened". However, the word used here means plain old "badness" and "evil," specifically moral evil, character flaws and defects. Jesus seems to use it to mean "problems". See this article for more information about the terms translated as "evil."

kakos

κακά: [7 verses](adj pl neut acc) "Evil things" is kakos, which means "bad", "mean", "base", "ugly", "ill-born", "evil", "worthless", "sorry", "pernicious," and "ill." -- The word translated as "sick" is an adjective which means many different forms of "bad," including "ugly", "low born", "craven," and "ill." In the NT, it is often translated as "evil." More about it in this article.

kalamos

κάλαμον [2 verses](noun sg masc acc) "A reed" is kalamos, which means "a reed" or anything made of reed, specifically a reed staff, a measuring reed, a reed you write with, a fishing pole, a shaft of an arrow, or a reed pipe.- "A reed" is translated from a Greek word that means "a reed," that is, a plant of hollow stalks that is not a bush or tree. Christ uses it as a metaphor for something standing upright that is not hard or solid.

kaleo

κληθήσῃ [38 verses](verb 2nd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be called" is kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand.""Shall be called" is kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand." -- The term translated as "call" is like our word "call" because it means both "to summon" and also "to name," but it does not as clearly mean "to address."

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kalos

καλοὺς [48 verses](adj pl masc acc) "Good" is kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." Referring to parts of the body, "fair" and "shapely."As an adverb,the word translated as "well" means, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly".   -- The word translated as "good means "good", "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality."    It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." -- As an adverb,the word translated as "well" means, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly". 

kalypto

κεκαλυμμένον [3 verses](part sg perf mp masc acc ) "Covered" is kalypto, which means tp "cover", "protect (of armor)", "hide", "conceal", "cover with dishonor", "throw a cloud over," and "put over as a covering." -- "Covered" is a word that means to "cover," "hide," and has the sense of to "cover with dishonor." It is a participle ("covering") in the past that is in the form that indicates something acting on itself, (has covered itself).

kamelos

κάμηλον [4 verses] (noun sg masc acc)"Camel" is kamelos, which means "camel." However, in Aramaic (gamal), the word means both "camel" and "rope." In Greek, they are slightly different, kamelos and kamilos. There is also the idea that this could be a reference to the "needle" gate in Jerusalem. -- "A camel" is translated from a Greek word that means "camel." It is in the form of an object of the verb translated as "to go." However, in Aramaic, a similar word means both "camel" and "rope." In Greek, they are slightly different. There is also the idea that this could be a reference to the "needle" gate in Jerusalem. Read the article here for a pretty good (but not perfect) analysis here.

kaminos

κάμινον [2 verses](noun sg fem acc) "A furnace" is kaminos, which imeans "oven," or "furnace." Most frequently for baking bread or bricks.  - The word translated as "furnace" is more properly an oven or kiln specifically designed for baking bread or bricks. Because the larger topic here is raising grain, the word would be heard as the "bread oven." this is a productive use for the false wheat. It is not burned to destroy it but to bake the bread from the true wheat.

kammuo

ἐκάμμυσαν: [1 verse](verb, 3rd, pl, aor, ind) "Closed" is from kammuo, which means specifically "to close or shut the eyes."  - The "they shall see" is from the common verb for "to see" and "to understand." It is not in the future tense, as in the KJV, but in a tense that indicates something that might probably happen at a specific time in the past present and future.

kamoi

(conj pron) "And...me" is a contraction kamoi from kai moi, meaning "and...me. "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "Me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

kan

κἂν [8 verses](conj)  "And if" is kan, which means "and if", "even if," and "although." It is a contraction of kai anKai is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." An, is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could." --  "And if" is from a conjunction that means "and if", "even if," and "although."  It is a contraction of the conjunction "and" that joins and the particle that indicates a possibility,

Kapharnaoum

Καφαρναούμ, [3 verses](noun) "Capernaum" is from Kapharnaoum, which is the Greek spelling of the fishing village in Galilee where Christ taught in the synagogue. -- -  This is the Greek spelling of the fishing village in Galilee where Jesus taught in the synagogue, home of Peter and others.

kardia

καρδίας [37 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Of heart" is kardia, which means "heart (the physical organ)", "the seat of emotions (especially passion, rage, and anger)", "inclination", "desire," "purpose", "mind", "the pith (in wood), and "the deep (of the sea)." -- "Heart" is the Greek word that means "heart" both the physical organ and as the seat of emotions, which we discuss in a larger Greek context in this article here. Jesus and the Septuagint use a singular "heart" when referring to a group of people.

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karphos

κάρφος [5 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Mote" is karphos, which means "any small dry body", "dry stalk", "dry twigs", "chips," "chaff," "straws", "bits of wool", "toothpick", "a small piece of wood on which the watchword was written," and "ripe fruit[plural],." -- The Greek term translated as "mote" means something small like "twig", "straw," or "chaff." These terms, especially "chaff" have the sense of "trash", "rubbish," and "remains."

karpos

καρπῶν [32 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Fruit" is karpos, which means "fruit", "the fruits of the earth", "seed", "offspring", "returns for profit," and "reward." -- The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit", "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors."

kata

Κατὰ [60 verses](prep) "Against" is kata can be a preposition or an adverb. As a preposition with the genitive, it means, means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "down (from),"  and, or time, "for." With the accusative, it means "down (to)," "according to," "about," " during," of motion, "on," "over," "throughout a space," "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally." As an adverb, it means "according as", "just as", "in so far as", "wherefore", "like as if" and "exactly as." -- The word translated as "against" means "down from", "down into", "against", "opposite", "separately", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally."

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katabaino

ταβαίνοντας” [25 verses](part pl pres act masc acc ) "Descending" is katabaino, which means "go down", "come down from," and "dismount from." Metaphorically, it means "attain", "conform to", "condescend", "fall in value," and "arrive at the end [of a speech]." -- The verb translated as "came down" means "go down" as we say in English that rain "comes down" not "goes down." 

katabibazo

καταβήσῃ.” [2 verses] (2nd sg fut ind mid) "Brought down" is katabibazo, which means to "cause to bring down" "come down from", "dismount from", "go down from", "attain (metaphor)", "come to", "arrive at", "conform to", "condescend", "fall in value," and "to bring down." -  "Brought down" is a word which means "to bring down" and "to bring down from." It also is in the second person future, but in a form that means the subject is acting on itself.

katadikazo

καταδικασθήσῃ. [3 verses](2nd sg fut ind pass) "Thou shalt be condemned" is from "By" is katadikazo, which means to "give judgment or sentence against a person", "condemn", "have judgment given in one's favor", "declare by express judgment," and, in the passive, "to be bound by a law," -- "Condemned" is  another uncommon Greek verb, which means "to give judgment", "to condemn," and "to have a judgment go against one." However, it also means to "have a judgment in one's favor. In the passive form (used here), it means "to be bound by law."

katakaio

κατακαῦσαι [2 verses](verb aor inf act) "To burn" is katakaio, which literally means "burn through out" and is generally used to mean "to burn completely," of the fingers, "to be burnt (with hot food)", of hot winds, "parch," and, in the passive, of fire, "burn down," and "burn out."  - "To burn" is from a verb which literally means "burn through out" and is generally used to mean "to burn completely" or "burn out."

katakaio

θερισταῖς [2 verses](noun pl masc dat) "To the reapers" is theristes, which means "a reaper," and "harvester."  - The word translated as "to the reapers" is a noun related to the word for "harvest" used above. Both are forms of the noun that means "to reap", "to mow," and "to harvest."

kataklino

[uncommon](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Make sit down" is kataklino, which means "to lay down", "cause to incline", "bend downwards", "lay prostrate", and with dative, "overthrow",  " to be set under", and  "made subject to." -- The verb translated as "make sit down" means "to lay down", "cause to incline", "bend downwards", "lay prostrate", and with dative, "overthrow",  " to be set under", and  "made subject to." It is not a common word for Jesus to use to mean "sit", but it refers specifically sitting down for a meal. 

kataklysmos

κατακλυσμοῦ [3 verses]](noun sg masc gen) "Flood" is kataklysmos, which means "flood", "inundation", and "deluge".  - The word translated as "flood" also means "deluge".

3
katakrinô

κατακρινοῦσιν [10 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind act or verb 3rd pl fut ind act or verb 3rd pl aor subj pass or verb 3rd pl aor subj act  or part pl pres/fut act masc/neut dat) "Shall condemn" is katakrinô, which means "to give a sentence against," and "to condemn."  - The verb translated as "shall condemn" is a verb form of the word translated as "judgment" above. It means "to judge against" or "decide against."

katakurieuo

κατακυριεύουσιν [1 verse](verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Dominion" is katakurieuo, which means "to gain or exercise complete dominion", "gain dominion over," and "gain possession." This carries the sense of ownership and control. From kata, which means "downwards", "down from", "down into," and "against." And from the verb form of "Lord" kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."  - Here we have the first invented word. It is translated as "to gain dominion over," and "gain possession," but it is made of two parts. The first means "down from" and the second is a verb form of the word usually translated as "lord." So, "lord over" is the way we would say this in English. This word is the verb form of word Jesus commonly uses as a noun and it appears without the prefix in Luke 22:25. However, this version, with the prefix, cannot be found before Jesus.

katalambano

() "Come upon" is katalambano, which means "to seize", "to lay hold of," [later] "to arrive at a place", "to seize for oneself", "to be possessed [passive of persons]", "to overtake", "to seize with the mind", "to comprehend", "to catch", "to find on arrival", "to come up with", "to hold down", "to repress", "to get under", "to hold [breath", "to bind", "to compel", "to restrain", "to force", "to convict," and "to condemn."

kataleipo

καταλείψει [3 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Leave" is kataleipo, which means "to be left", "left behind", "forsake", "abandon", "leave," and "remaining."  - "Leave" is from a verb that means "to be left", "left behind", "forsake", "abandon", "leave," and "remaining." It is not the verb that is used in the Gospels to mean "leave" in the sense of leaving a place." It is in the future tense.

katalyo

καταλυθήσεται. [4 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Be thrown down" is katalyo, which means "to put down", "to destroy", "to dissolve", "to break up", "to dismiss", "to disband", "to abolish", "to bring to an end", "to unloose," and "to unyoke."

4
katanoeo

κατανοεῖς; [5 verses](2nd sg pres ind act) "Consider" is from katanoeo, which means to "observe well", "understand", "apprehend", "perceive", "learn", "consider", "look at", "view", "to be in one's right mind," and "to be in one's senses."  - The word translated as "consider primarily means "observe well" and "understand". It is based on a root word that means "to understand" or "to perceive with the mind". It has a specific sense of coming to understand something.

katapateo

καταπατήσουσιν [3 verses](3rd pl aor subj act) "They trample" is from katapateo, which means "to trod underfoot", "trample," and "trample down."  - The word for "trample" is also is also a metaphor for treating someone rudely or spurning them, treating them with neglect.

kataphroneo

καταφρονήσητε [3 verses](verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Despise" is kataphroneô, which means "look down upon", "think slightly of", "to be disdainful", "deal contemptuously", "think contemptuously that," and "to despise."  - "Despise" is from a verb that means "look down upon." Its prefix is the Greek prefix for "downward" and its base is the verb for knowing or understanding.

katapontizo

καταποντισθῇ [1 verse](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "He were drowned" is katapontizo, which means "to be thrown in the sea", "to plunge into the sea", "to sink into the sea," and "to drown." The first word, kata, means "downward."  - "He were drowned" is from a verb which means "to be thrown in the sea," and "to drown," but the prefix on it means "downward," so the sense is "down in the sea."

kataraomai

[uncommon](part pl pres mp masc acc) "Them that curse" is from kataraomai, which means "to call down curses upon", "curse", and "execrate." -- "Them that curse" is an unusual word for Christ to use. It means "to call down curses upon". It is in the form of an adjective and in the form of one acting on themselves, so "calling down curses on yourselves."

katartizo

κατηρτίσω [2 verses](verb 2nd sg aor ind) "Thou hast perfected" is katartizô, which means "to adjust", "to put in order", "to restore", "to mend," "to furnish", "to equip," and "to prepare." It is a metaphor meaning to "restore to a right mind," It also means to "compound," or "prepare" dishes or medicines,  - "Thou hast perfected" is from a verb which means "to furnish", "to equip," and "to prepare." It is a metaphor from being restored to one's right mind. In the original verse in Psalms, the Hebrew word here means to "found", "fix," and "establish," and it is translated in the KJV as "ordained."

kataskenoo

κατασκηνοῖν [3 verses] (verb aor inf act) "Lodge" is from kataskênoô, which means "to camp" and "to take up quarters" but specifically means "to settle" when applied to birds.  - The word translated as "lodge" is a verb that means "to camp" and "to take up quarters" but specifically means "to settle" when applied to birds. The description is more

kataskenosis

κατασκηνώσεις, [2 verses](noun pl fem nom) "Have nests" is kataskenosis, which means "encamping", "taking up one's quarters," and "resting place (of birds)." -- The term translated as "have nests" is a noun primarily "camping." When applied to birds, it means a perch. The only translation of this word to mean "nests" that I can find is in this verse.

kataskeuazo

κατασκευάσει [2 verses](3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall prepare" is kataskeuazô, which means "to equip", "to furnish fully with", "to build", "to prove", "to construct," and "to prepare oneself."  - "Shall prepare" is a word that means "to equip", "to prove", "to construct," and "to prepare oneself." It is in the future tense. Christ uses this word only in this quote here and in Luke 7:26, the parallel quote in Luke. A completely different Greek word is used in the Septuagint. A word that I cannot find a good Greek definition of. 

katesthio

κατέφαγεν [7 verses](3rd sg aor ind act) "Devoured" is from katesthio, which means "to eat up" and "to devour." It is a term applied to animals of prey. It also means "to corrode" or "to be gnawed."  -  "Devoured" is from a verb that means "to eat up" and "to devour." This verb doesn't match the plural form of the noun, "birds.  It is a term applied to animals of prey. It also means "to corrode" or "to be gnawed."  This verb to is singular though not matching "the birds," which seems to be the subject.

katexousiazo

κατεξουσιάζουσιν [2 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Exercise authority" is katexousiazo, which gets translated "to have power", "to exercise power," and "to be the master of a body." From kata, which means "downwards", "down from", "down into," and "against." And a verb from of exousia which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power."

katharizo

καθαρίζονται [12 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind mp) "Be clean" is katharizo, which means "to clean", "to clear the ground of weeds," "prune away", "to remove dirt", "to purify,"and "to remove impurities." It is also used to describe the removal of the inedible parts from grain (winnowing), clearing weeds from a field, pruning a plant and so on.-- The Greek word translated as "be clean," means to remove dirt. It is used for a lot of specific types of "cleaning" including cleansing a person of leprosy but it also has a general meaning of "purifying" anything.

12
katharo

καθαρόν. [5 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Clean" is katharos, which means "physically clean", "spotless", "clear", "pure (water)", "clear of objects", "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound." -- The Greek word translated as "clean" means "physically clean", "spotless," "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound."

5
kathedra

καθέδρας [4 verses](noun pl fem acc)  "Seat" is kathedra, which means "a chair", "a seat" "a sitting position", "the sitting part", "the posterior," "sitting idle," "inaction", "the chair [of a teacher]", "a session," and "a throne," is used to denote a position of power. From the Greek kata("down") hedraios ("to settle") .

4
kathegetes

καθηγηταί, [1 verse](noun pl masc dat) "Masters" is kathêgêtês, which means "guide" and "teacher" and "professor."  - "Master" here is the same root as "masters" above.

1
kathemai

καθημένοις [13 verses](part pl perf mid masc dat) "Sitting" is kathemai, which means "to sit", "to be seated", "to sit still", "to sit quiet", "to reside," and "to be placed."  - "Sitting" is a Greek verb that means to "be seated", "sit," especially of courts, councils, assemblies, etc.  The sense of being put in a position of authority as we would say "chair." It also means to "sit still" or "sit idle."

13
katheudo

καθεύδειν [12 verses](verb pres inf act) "Slept" is katheudo, which means "to lie down to sleep", "to sleep," and "to lie asleep."  - The term used for "slept" is a Greek verb which means not just to sleep, but "to lie down in sleep." However, it is in the form of an infinitive, which, when introduced by an article, acts like a noun, therefor, "the sleeping" or "falling asleep."

12
kathiemi

Κάθου [2 verses](verb aor imperat mid ) "Sit" is kathiemi, [not kathemai, which means to "be seated", "sit."], which means to "let fall", "drop", "send down", "pour down", "run down (of rivers)," in a general sense, "set in motion," "employ," "allow to return from exile," "swoop down (like a wind)" and, in the passive, "to be put in motion." It it a general term that has a number of specialized meanings.  - "Sit" it is from a Greek verb means "to let fall" or "to drop," but it has a lot of casual uses such putting things in motion and employing them. It, like many Greek words that have the sense of "sit" begins with the prefix that means "down."

2
kathinmi

καθήσεσθε [1 verse](verb 2nd pl fut ind mid) "Shall sit" is kathinmi, which means to "let fall", "drop", "send down", "pour down", "run down (of rivers)," in a general sense, "set in motion," "employ," "allow to return from exile," "swoop down (like a wind)" and, in the passive, "to be put in motion." It it a general term that has a number of specialized meanings.  - The second "shall sit" is a very different word than the one above. It means "to let fall" or "to drop," but it has a lot of casual uses such putting things in motion and employing them. It, like the "sit" above begins with the prefix meaning "down." This word is in the future tense and in a form that indicates the subject, the apostles, acting on themselves.

1
kathistemi

κατέστησεν [7 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Has made ruler" is kathistemi which means "to set down", "to bring down", "to bring into a certain state", "to make", "to be established", "to be instituted," and "to stand against."

7
kathizo

καθίσαντες [15 verses](part pl aor act masc nom) "Sat down" "Sit" is kathizô, which means "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint", "to establish", "to put in a certain condition", "to reside", "to sink down", "to run aground [for ships]," "to recline at meals," and "to settle." From the Greek kata("down") hedraios ("to settle") . -- "Sit...down" is a Greek verb  "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint",  and "to establish".

15
kathos

καθὼς [36 verses] (adv) "How" is kathos, which means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

36
kaumatizo

ἐκαυματίσθη [2 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "They were scorched" is kaumatizô, which means "to burn", "to suffer from the heat", "to heat," and, in the passive, "to be heated," "to be burnt up."  - "They were scorched" is a verb that, in the passive, means "to be heated" or "to be burnt up."

kauson

καύσωνα. [2 verses]] (noun sg masc acc) "Heat" is kauson, which means "burning heat" and "summer heat."  - "Heat" is from a noun which means "burning heat" and "summer heat." Jesus only uses this word two times, both related to hot weather.

keleuo

ἐκέλευσεν [1 verse](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Command" is keleuo, which means "urge on", "drive on," "exhort", "order", "command," (of inferiors) "urge," and "entreat."  - "Command" is from a verb that means "urge on", "exhort", "order", "command," and "entreat."

kephale

κεφαλῆς [12 verses] (noun sg fem gen) "Head" is kephale, which means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing. -- The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

12
keraia

() "Tittle" is keraia, which means "the horn of an animal", "the antenna of crustaceans", "a bow", "an instrument for blowing", "a drinking horn", "horn points [for writing instruments]", "objects shaped like horns", "the wing [of an army]", "branch of a river", "corps of men", "sailyard", "mountain peak," and "anything made of horn." The small apostrophe like mark to distinguish numbers from letters in Greek is horn-shaped and therefore called a keraia.

kerdaino

κερδήσῃ [4 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Gain" is kerdaino, which means "to gain", "to derive profit", "to spare or save oneself," and to "gain an advantage." In a negative sense, it means "to reap a disadvantage from a thing." -- The word translated as "gain" means, interestingly enough, to gain in the sense of gain an advantage and, interestingly enough, "to derive a profit." Jesus only uses it four times, consistently with sense of "benefit" or "win."

kerysso

κηρύξατε [11 verses](2nd pl aor ind act or 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Preach" is kerysso, which means "to be a herald", "to summon by a herald", "proclaim", "call upon", "announce", "declare," and "command publicly." Only in the NT is it translated as "preach" or "teach publicly." -- The word translated as "preach" means "to act as a herald", "to proclaim," and "to declare."

ketos

κήτους [1 verse](noun sg neut gen) "Whale's" is from ketos, which means "any sea monster," or "huge fish."  - "Whale" is a common faulty translation of the Greek word that means "sea monster" or "huge fish."

klados

κλάδος [5 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Branches" is klados , which means "branches", "twig", "shoot," and "branch" of a blood vessel.   -  The word for "branch" means a new shoot of a tree as well as any type of branches, such as branches of learning. Notice, it is not plural but singular, so its seems to refer to a shoot of a tree, a new tree, rather than its branches. Fig trees are started from cuttings, that is, a spout is cut from a tree and planted. This is why this particular tree is used as an example here.

5
klaio

() "Weep" is from klaiowhich means "to weep", "to cry", "to lament," and "to wail." - The verb translated as "weep" means "to weep", "to lament," and "to cry".

klauthmos

κλαυθμὸς [6 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Weeping" is klauthmos which means "a weeping."  - The "weeping" come from a noun that means "weeping." The noun form, however, is very formal and unusual, more like "weepation."

klauthmos

ἐξώτερον: [3 verses](adj sg neut acc) "Outer" is exoteros, which means "outer" and "utter," and literally means "more outside."  - - The word translated as "outer" is the adjective that means "more outside," but it is preceded by an article, so it acts as a noun, "the outside".

kleio

κλείετε [5 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye shut up" can be one of two words. One is kleio, which means "to shut", "to close", "to bar", "to block up", "to shut in", "to confine," and "to shut up." It is a metaphor for causing the heavens to withhold rain. However, this form of the word is also a form of the verb kleo, which means to "tell of", "make famous," and" "celebrate." -- The word translated as "ye shut up" means "to close" or "to shut in." 

5
kleptes

() "Thieves" is kleptes, which means a "thief", "cheat," and "knave."

klepto

κλέψεις [6 verses](verb 2nd sg aor subj act or verb 2nd sg fut ind) "To steal" is klepto, which means "to steal", "to cheat", "to spirit away", "to conceal", "to keep secret", "to do secretly", "to seize or occupy secretly", "to bring about secretly," and "to do secretly or treacherously."  - "Steal" is from a verb that means "to steal", "to cheat," and "to do secretly or treacherously."

kleronomeo

κληρονομήσει. [3 verses] (verb 2nd sg fut ind mid)"Will inherit" is kleronomeo, which means "to inherit", "to acquire", "to receive possession of", "to obtain", "to be an heir," and "to leave an heir behind."  - -- "Inherit" is from a verb that means "inherit", "acquire," and "to be an heir." It is in the future tense and in a form where the person acts on himself so the sense.

klêronomos

κληρονόμος: [3 verses] (noun sg masc nom) "Heir" is klêronomos, which means "heir" and "heir apparent."  - "Heir" is from a noun that means "heir" and "heir apparent."

kletos

κλητοὶ [2 verses](adj pl masc nom) "Called" is kletos, which means "invited", "welcome", "called out", "chosen,"   and "summoned to court."  - The Greek word translated as "called" means "invited", "welcome", "called out", "chosen," and "summoned to court." It is NOT the word usually translated as "called" in the NT, which is more like our word "called."

2
klibanos

κλίβανον [2 verses] (noun sg masc acc) "Oven" is klibanos, which means "covered earthen vessel [in which bread is baked in a fire], "funnel-shaped vessel [used for drawing water]", "underground channel", "vaulted passage", "hollow," and "cavern in a rock."  -

The oven is Greek for a small, clay vessel used for baking bread (see picture above).  The ovens Jesus describes are different than ours, which have the fire is on the outside and bread on the inside. These ovens are clay vessels. The fire is burned in the vessel. The dough for the bread is attached to the vessel's sides. The "grass", that is, the foliage, of "the lilies of the field" (Matthew 6:28) becomes the fuel for baking bread. This image is similar to the one evoked by the "Parable of the Weeds", where the weeds are bundled to be burned in ovens.

kline

κλίνην [6 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Bed" is kline, which means "that on which one lies", "couch," and a "grave-niche." -- The word translated as "bed" means "that on which one lies," but it also means a "grave-niche."

klino

κλίνῃ. [2 verses](3rd sg pres subj act or 3rd sg aor subj act or 3rd sg aor subj pass) "To lay" is klino, which means to "cause to lean", "make to slope or slant", "turn aside", "make another recline", "make subservient," and "inflect. In the passive, it means to "lean", "stay oneself", "lie down", "fall," "decline," and "wane" and is a metaphor for "having devoted himself to," and "wander from the right course." It is the source of the English terms "incline," and "recline." -- The term translated as "to lay" doesn't mean "lay" but "to make lean." In the passive, it means "to lean", "decline," or "to lay down." It is the source of the English terms "incline", "decline," and "recline." It could be either active or passive form. It is an uncommon word for Christ, but a form of it was just used in Matthew 8:11 to describe reclining at a meal.

klisia

[uncommon] (noun sg fem gen) "In a company" is klisia, which means "a place for lying down or reclining", "anything for lying or sitting upon," a "couch for reclining at a table", "nuptial bed," and a "company" of people reclining at meals. -- Another uncommon word is translated as "in a company". It means "a place of sitting or laying down", but like word "seating" in English, it refers to a group of diners. It is in a form that is normally used as the possessive, but here indicates a part, "as part of as seating". 

klope

κλοπαί, [2 verses]( noun pl fem nom) "Thefts" is klope, which means "theft", "plagiarism," "fraud," and "stealth."  - "Theft" is from a word that covers forms of dishonesty from theft to fraud,

koilia

κοιλίᾳ [6 verses ](noun sg fem dat) "Belly" is from the Greek, koilia, which means the "cavity within the body" (from the Greek, koilos, for "hollow"), "belly", "abdomen", "intestines,""excrement," "womb," any hollow in the body, and "a hollow in the earth." From the Greek, koilos, for "hollow".  - "Belly" is from the Greek word meaning any abdomen, referring generally to any opening in the body. In Greek, the home of the most basic emotions, food, sex, and other forms of immediate gratification.  The Greeks considered the belly the source of our animal impulses and desires: food, sex, and other forms of immediate gratification.

koinoo

 κοινοῖ [7 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) The word translated above as "defile" is koinoô, which means to "communicate," impart information", "make common", "share", "undertake together", "make common cause in", "take counsel with", "take counsel with", "consult", "to be partner or partaker," and "have communication with."  - - The word translated above as "defile" is a verb that means primarily "to communicate," and "to share." It has a host of meanings related to communication and sharing. It can mean "make common," but in the sense of "make common knowledge" or "make common property," not in the sense as in English, "to make lower-class. The word also means "to partner" and "to come to terms with." It is a play on the Jewish concept of purity and holiness versus what common and every day.

kokkos

κόκκῳ [6 verses](noun sg masc dat) "A grain" is kokkos, which means "a grain" and "a seed", "testicles," and it is a metaphor for a "grain of sense." -- The word translated as "grain" means "kernel," or "grain." It can also mean "seed." However, it is not the most common word for a "seed" in Greek which is sperma in Greek.

kollao

κολληθήσεται [1 verse](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall cleave" is kollao, which means to "glue", "cement", "mend (a broken vessel)", "join (substance to another)," generally, "join fast together", "unite," and in the passive, to "cleave to," and "is indissolubly bound to."  - "Cleave" is from a verb that means "to glue to or on", "to join (two substances)", "unite" and "to be stuck to" or "to be glued to." It is in the future tense.

koloboo

ἐκολοβώθησαν [2 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Should be shortened" is koloboô, which means "to dock", "to curtail," and "to mutilate." Kolobôsis means "mutilation."

2
kolyo

κωλύετε [7 verses](verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Forbid" is kolyo, which means "to hinder", "withhold," and "to prevent."  - "Forbid" is from a verb that means "to hinder" and "to prevent."

kome

κώμην [6 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Town" is kome, which means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city. -- "Town" is a word meaning a village where farmer lived close to their fields, rather than a place of trade and commerce or for a specific quarter of a larger city.

koniortos

() "The dust" is koniortos, which means "dust raised or stirred up", "cloud of dust," and more generally,"dirt," or "sweepings," and, as a metaphor, "dirty fellow." -- The word translated as "dust" means a cloud of dust or dirt. It is also a metaphor for a dirty fellow.

konops

κώνωπα [1 verse] (noun sg masc acc) "Gnat" is konops, which means "gnat," and "mosquito."

1
kophinos

κοφίνους [2 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Baskets" is kophinos, which means "basket" and infers a measure.  - "Baskets" is from a Greek word that means "basket" and infers a measure.

kophos

χκωφοὶ [3 verses] (adj pl masc nom) "The deaf" is from kophos, which means "the mute", "the dull," and "the obtuse" and from this it came to mean "deaf." - "The deaf" is a word that primarily means "the dull" or "the mute" which came to mean "deaf."

kopiao

κοπιῶντες [3 verses' (part pl pres act masc nom) "Ye that labour" is kopiao, which means "to be tired", "grow weary", "to be tired", "grow weary", "work hard", "toil", "strive", "struggle", "come to rest," and "arrive at a state of saturation."  - "Labour" is from a Greek verb acting as a noun, the subject of the sentence. It is not in the second person. The verb means "to be tired", "to grow weary", "to work hard," and "to toil."  It is a negative form of a verb that means "to rest from toil." The sense is "the ones growing weary"

kopto

ἐκόψασθε: [2 verses](2nd pl aor ind mid) "You have...lamented" is koptô, which means "to smite", "to pound," "to chop," "to cut off," and "to beat one's breast. -- "Lamented" is a verb that means "to smite", "to pound," "to cut off," and "to beat one's breast." The basic word means to "beat" in the sense of to "hit" or "pound".  It is translated as "mourn" and "lamented" in the Bible but related words are translated as "cut off" and "beat against."

2
korasion

κοράσιον,[2 verses](noun sg neut nom ) "Maid" is from the Greek korasion, which means "little girl" and "maiden."  - "Maid" is a Greek noun that means "little girl" and "maiden." This word is only used twice by Jesus, once here and once in a verse in Mark referring to the same girl.

kosmeo

κεκοσμημένον. [4 verses](part sg perf mp masc acc) "Garnished" is kosmeô, which means "arrange", "order", "prepare", "adorn", "equip", "adorn", "dress", "embellish", "honour," and, in the passive, "to be assigned," and "to ascribed to."  - The Greek word translated as "garnished" means to  "arrange", "order", "prepare". In the passived, it would be "having been ordered", or "having been adorned." In the middle voice, it would be "having adorned himself", "having honored himself. It is the verb form of the more common kosmos, which is usually translated as "world" but more clearly means "world order."

4
kosmos

κόσμῳ [63 verses](noun sg masc dat) "World" is kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." It is a form of the is verb kosmeô, which means "to order", "to arrange", "to rule", "to adorn" (especially women), and "to equip." It especially means controlling and arranging an army. -- Jesus uses the word translated as "the world" to mean "the world order," specifically the powers-that-be. Today, we use the word "society" or "regime" in this sense. More about this word in this article about related words.

63
krateo

κρατήσει [7 verses](3rd sg fut ind act or 2nd sg fut ind mid) "Lay hold" is from krateo, which means to be strong, powerful: "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command."  - "Lay hold" is f a verb that means "to be strong", "to prevail", "to get possession of," and "to lay hold of." In English, "overpower" is a good equivalent.

krauge,

κραυγὴ[1 verses] (noun sg fem nom) "Cry" is from krauge, which means "crying", "screaming," and "shouting."

1
kremannymi

κρεμασθῇ [2 vereses](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Were hanged" is kremannymi, which means to "hang up", "hang", "crucify", "hang over," and, in the passive, "to be hung up", "to be hanged", "suspended," "to be wholly taken up with," and, metaphorically, "to be in suspense."  - "Were hung" is from a verb that mean "to hang" and, in the passive, "to be hanged." Interestingly, it also has a little of the sense we used in phrases such as to be "hung up" on something as in to be "wholly taken up with it."

krima

κρίματι [5 verses](noun sg neut dat) "Judgment" is krima, which means "decision", "judgment", "decree", "verdict," "resolution," and a "legal decision."  - - The Greek word translated as "judgment" is a "verdict," a "decree," or a "decision." It is also the announcement of a decision made by a leader. It is not the English virtue of "good judgment."

krino

κρίνετε [30 verses](2nd pl pres ind act) "Judge" is krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way. -- The term used here for "judge" is a much more complicated idea. Unlike most words, which Christ uses specifically, he uses this word in a variety of senses simply because no English word corresponds to it precisely. He can mean "judge", "criticize", "decide", "discriminate," and "separate," depending on the context. We try to keep as closely as possible to the primary meaning of "separate" except when it doesn't fit.

krinon

κρίνα (noun pl neut acc) "Lilies" is krinon, which means "white lily", "Lilium candidum", "symbolic of death", "Egyptian bean", "kind of choral dance", "kind of loaf," and "architectural ornament." - The "lilies " is a straightforward translation for a word that means "lilies" that are regular white lilies. They were then, as now, a symbol of death. The root of this word is the same as the verb translated as "judge" and the masculine noun translated as "judges."

krisis

κρίσει [26 verses]((noun sg fem dat) "Judgment" is krisis, which means "separating", "distinguishing", "judgment", "choice", "election", "trial", "dispute", "event," and "issue." -- The Greek word translated as "judgment" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. Christ uses it in a variety of ways, though the KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. Only secondarily does it means "judgment" as in a court judgment.

26
krites

κριταὶ (noun masc pl nom) "Judges"  is krites, which means "judge", "umpire," and "interpreter."  - - The word "judges" means "judge" or "interpreter" and it is the noun form of the word meaning "to decide" or "to separate."

krouo

κρούετε, [6 verses](2nd pl pres imperat) "Knock" is krouo, which means to "strike", "smite", "strike one against another", "strike together", "knocking", "examine", "try", "prove," and "knock at the door [on the outside]." -- The word translated as "knock" also means "to examine" and "to prove.

krypto

κρυπτὸν [9 verses](part sg pres act neut nom) "Hid" is from krypto, which means "to hide", "to cover," "to conceal." "to keep secret", "cover in the earth", "bury", "conceal", "argue so that the opponent is unwarily led to an adverse conclusion", "lie hidden," in passive, "conceal oneself from," "hide oneself," and "lie hidden," -- (WF) "Hid" is from a verb meaning "to keep secret." It is in the form of a participle acting as an adjective modifying the earlier word "nothing." Unlike the earlier "covered," this is in the present tense, "hiding."

kryptos

() "Secret" is kryptos, which is an adjective meaning "hidden", "secret", "concealed", "in disguise [of people]", "secret service," and "deep-seated." -- The word translated as "secret" also means "hidden" and concealed."

ktaomai

κτήσησθε [3 verses] (verb 2nd pl aor subj mid or 2nd pl fut ind mid) "Provide" is ktaomai, which means to "acquire", "get specifically for oneself", "procure for oneself", "win", "bring upon oneself (of consequences)," and "have in store (opposite of echo, "having in hand"). -- The term translated as "provide" means "to acquire," but specifically for yourself. It also means "to possess" in the sense of having something stored in opposition to echo, having it in hand. With the "in" preposition it seems to be used as "store."

ktizo

κτίσας [1 verse](part sg aor act masc nom) "He which made" is ktizo, which means "(of a city) found", "build", "plant (a grove)", "produce", "create", "bring into being", "make," and "perpetuate (a deed).  - This verb means "(of a city) found", "build", "plant (a grove)", "produce", "create", "bring into being", "make," and "perpetuate (a deed).

kullos

κυλλὸν [2 verses] (adj sg masc acc) "Maimed" is kullos, which means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."  - "Maimed" is from an adjective means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."

kyminon

κύμινον, [1 verse](noun sg neut acc) "Cummin" is from kyminon, which means "cumin."

1
kyon

κυσίν, [2 verses](noun pl masc/fem dat) "Dogs" is from kyon, which means "dog", "bitch", "shepherds' dogs", "watch-dogs," a word of reproach to denote shamelessness or audacity (in women); recklessness (in men), and offensive people generally (compared to yapping dogs), a positive metaphor for people implying, watch-dog or guardian, servants, agents or watchers, and "the ace (the worst throw at dice)."  - The Greek word translated as "dogs", means a "dog". As in many languages, it was also an insult. Specifically, it implied shamelessness and in women and recklessness in men. This is an uncommon word for Jesus to use. 

kyrios

κύριον [92 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Lord" is kyrios, which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." -- The word translated as "master" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

lachanon

λαχάνων [3 verses](noun pl neut gen) "Herbs" is lachanon, which generally means "garden plants" as an opposite of wild plants, "garden herbs," and "vegetables" -- The term translated as "herbs" but generally means "garden plants" as an opposite of wild plants. The point here is cultivation. "Cultivation" was a sign of civilization rather than the wild state of things. Mustard plant are one of the oldest known cultivated plants. Cultivation is also symbolic of educating children.

laleo

λαλήσητε: (2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall speak"is laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle", "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. However, Jesus seems to use in in the sense of "relaying" information gained from another. -- The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter", "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Jesus uses it to capture the idea of "pass on" or "relay" information because that captures both someone gossiping and an oracle does. The word is somewhat self-effacing. 

lambano

λαμβάνει [54 verse](3rd sg pres ind act) "Receiveth" is lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion." -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

54
lampas

λαμπάδας [5 verses](noun pl fem acc) "Lamps" is from lampas, which means "torch", "beacon light", "light," and any type of "lamp."  - The word for "lamps" is actually the source of our English word "lamp." It describes any burning light source, from torches to oil lamps.

5
lampo

λάμπει [3 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "It giveth light" is lampo, which means "to shine forth", "to ring loud and clear," and "to illuminate." -- (CW) The word translated as "gives light" is better translated as  "shines out" or "illuminates." It does not contain either the words "give" or "light." The Greek word used here is the source of our word "lamp."

3
laos

λαοῦ [4 verses](noun sg masc gen) "People's" is from the Greek laos, which means "men (of the army)," "the common men", "subjects (of a ruler)", "work people", "people assembled", "the multitude", "a specific group or tribe of people," and "a people."  - "People" is from a very uncommon word for Jesus. It means a specific group such as the common people, the multitude. It is the assembly of ayn troops or a tribe sharing the same name. With the use of the word "this" it most likely refers to the Jewish people of Christ's era.

latreuo

() "Serve" is latreuo, which means "to work for hire or pay", "to be subject or enslaved to", "to serve", "to be devoted to," and "to serve the gods with prayers and sacrifices."

lego

λέγουσιν [264 verses](3rd pl pres ind act ) "They say" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." When used with an object is has the sense of "call by name."  It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."  When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."  It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

lepros

λεπροὶ [4 verses] (adj pl masc nom) "Lepers" is lepros, which "scaly," scabrous," and "rough" and is used to describe the leprous. -- "Leper" is an adjective that means "scaly," scabrous," and "rough". It describes any skin problem, not just the disease leprosy.

lestes

λῃστῶν.” [10 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Thieves" is from lestes, which means "robber" or "pirate." -- The term translated as "thieves" means "robber" or "pirate."

leukos

() "White" is leukos, which means "light", "bright", "clear", "brilliant," and the colors "white" and "pale gold." It is a metaphor for "clear", "distinct," and "plain."

likmao

λικμήσει [2 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Grind to powder" is likmao, which means "to winnow" that is, separate chaff from grain by throwing up up in the air. It also is used as a metaphor for "to scatter", "to crush," and "to destroy." -- "Grind to powder" is from a verb that means "to winnow" that is, separate chaff from grain by throwing up in the air. It also is used as a metaphor for "to scatter like chaff."

limos

λιμοὶ [6 verse](noun pl masc/fem nom) "Famines" is limos, which means "hunger", "famine," and "a hungry wrench." -- "Famine" is the Greek word for "hunger", and "famine".

6
lithoboleo

ἐλιθοβόλησαν. [3 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Stoned" is lithoboleo, which means "to pelt with stones."  - "Stoned" is from a verb that means "to pelt with stones." It is not the same word usually used to describe an executions by stoning.

lithos

λίθον [15 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Stone" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones. -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

logos

λόγος, [80 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Word" is logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," "reputation" (when applied to people), and "value." -- "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning," but it has many, many specific meanings from "deliberation" to "narrative."  It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. However, when applied to people, it means "repute" or "reputation." More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it but it also means the communication of various types, so "message" often works better.

80
loipos

λοιποὶ [6 verses](adj pl masc nom) "Remnant" is loipos, which means "remaining over," "the remaining," "the rest, "descendants," of Time, "the future", "henceforward", "hereafter," and "the remaining."  =- "Remnant" is from an uncommon word that means "remaining over," "the rest," and, of Time, "the future", "henceforward."

6
luou

() "He that is washed" is luou, which "to wash", "to wash the body", "to bathe," and is a metaphor for "to purify."

lutron

λύτρον [2 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc) "Ransom" is lutron, which "ransom," "the price paid for ransom", "the price paid for the freedom of a slave", "sum paid for redemption of a pledge", "atonement," and generally, "recompense."  - The word translated as "ransom" means the money paid for a ransom, but it also means the money paid to free a slave, or, more generally, "recompense."

lychnia

λυχνίαν, [3 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Candlestick" is lychnia, which means "lampstand." -- The word translated as "candlestick" means "lampstand."

lychnos

λύχνος [9 verses](noun sg masc nom ) "Candle" is lychnos, which means "portable light," or "lamp." -- The word translated a "candle" primarily means "lamp", specifically, a portable one. The main form of portable lights in this era were oil lamps made from clay.

lykos

λύκοι [3 verses](noun pl masc nom ) "The wolf" is lykos (lukos), which means "wolf", "grisly", "jackals", "anything shaped like a hook", "a kind of noose," and "an engine of war for defending gates." -- The Greek word for "wolves" means wolves or jackals, but it is also the name for anything shaped like a hook. It is in the possessive modifying "midst", "competition," and "difference." The wolves are not a flock or a group, though many, but separated and in competition with a group.

lyo

Λύσατε  [10 verses](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Destroy" is lyo, (luo) which means "loosen", "unbind", "unfasten", "unyoke", "unharness", "release", "deliver", "give up", "dissolve", "break up", "undo", "destroy", "repeal", "annul", "break", "solve", "fulfill", "atone for", "fulfill," and "pay." -- The word translated as "loosen" means to "unbind. "dissolve", "break up", "undo", "and means "to annul" a law. It is the same word Jesus uses to refer to "breaking" commandments.

lypeo

ἐλυπήθησαν [3 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "They were...sorry" is lypeo, which means "to cause harm", "to cause grief," "to vex", "to cause pain," and, in the passive, "to be grieved", "to be distressed," and "to be in pain."  - "They were...sorry" is from a verb that means "to grieve", "to vex", "to cause pain", "to cause grief," and, in the passive, "to be grieved", "to be distressed," and "to be in pain."

machaira

μάχαιραν. [8 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Sword" is machaira, which means a "large knife", "large dagger", "short sword," or "dirk." It specifically the type of weapon used for making sacrifices, by assassins, bodyguards, and jugglers. -- The term for "sword" means a short sword, a weapon much more like a machete since the Greek is the source for the English word. It is specifically the type of weapon used for making sacrifices, by assassins, bodyguards, and jugglers. Jugglers is particularly interesting because of the word "toss". This is exactly the type of sword you toss around when juggling.

makarios

μακάριός [25 verses](adj sg masc nom ) "Blessed" is makarios which means "blessed", "prosperous", "happy", "fortunate," and "blissful." -- The word "blessed" in Greek is an adjective a noun meaning "happy" or "fortunate" but with the sense of favored by God. It can also mean "wealthy" with in the sense of "the wealthy" (men with a fortune).

makrothymeo

Μακροθύμησον [3 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Be patient" is makrothymeo, which means "to be long-suffering", "to persevere," "to be slow (to help)," and "to bear patiently."  - "Have patience" is from a Greek verb that "to be long-suffering", "to persevere," and "to bear patiently." It means literally "remote anger," so patience is a matter of putting off anger.

malakos

μαλακοῖς [2 verses](adj pl neut dat) "Soft" is from malakos, which means "freshly plowed," but it was used for a lot of ideas for gentleness and softness such as sleeping softly, sitting on a soft pillow, and soft grass. It is used to mean "soft" in a negative sense, for the idea of faint-hearted, and cowardly and lacking self-control. It was used specifically to describe men as effeminate and morally debased.  - The "soft" here is an adjective, which means "freshly plowed," but it was used for a lot of ideas for gentleness and softness such as sleeping softly, sitting on a soft pillow, and soft grass. It is used to mean "soft" in a negative sense, for the idea of faint-hearted, and cowardly and lacking self-control.

mallon

μᾶλλον [13 verses](adv) "Much" is mallon, which is the comparative of mala which means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."  - "Much" is the comparative form of the Greek word that means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

mamona

μαμωνᾷ. [4 verses](noun sg masc dat) "Mammon" is not Greek. It could be from the Aramaic mamona, "riches" or "wealth," or from Hebrew mamon, "security", "that which is trusted," or "deposit" or from Akkardian "mimmu" meaning "property." -- (UW) "Mammon" is not from any Greek word, but it is a word that is untranslated from the Greek letters of the sources. There is some debate about both its source and its meaning.  The Aramaic source words mean "wealth" and "money", but Jesus readily uses the Greek words for wealth and for money, both generally and specifically.  From the context in which he uses it, he seems to used it to refer to ill-gotten gains, that is, plunder or loot.

manthano

μάθετε [5 verses] (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act)"Learn" is manthano, which means "to learn" especially by study or practice, "acquire a habit of", "perceive", "understand," and "notice."   - "Learn" is a word that means "to learn especially by experience or study." This is consistent with the different verb used below to translate as "you see".

5
margarites

μαργαρίτας [3 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Pearls" is margarites, which means "pearl," and "a precious stone." It is a metaphor for "wisdom."  - The Greek word "pearls", as in English, means a piece of wisdom, as in a "pearl of wisdom." Christ uses it specifically as a metaphor for the wisdom of the realm of the skies.

martyreo

μαρτυρεῖτε [16 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye be witness" is martyreo, which means "to bear witness", "to give evidence", "give a good report", "testify to," and "acknowledge the value of." It is the basis for our word "martyr." == "Witness" is the Greek ver that means "to give testimony" and "to bear witness." It has the sense of being true testimony. It is the verb form of the Greek word for "testimony" and "proof," which is the source of our word "martyr," and its funny spelling.

martyrion

μαρτύριον [4 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Testimony" "Testimony" is martyrion, which means "testimony," and proof." -- "Testimony" is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was.

martys

μαρτύρων [5 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Witnesses" is martys, which means "witness" or "witnesses" and later came to mean "martyr."  - "Witnesses" is from the Greek word that means "witness" or "witnesses" and later came to mean "martyr." It is the noun form of the verb that means "to testify" or "bear witness."

mastigoo

μαστιγώσουσιν [5 verses](3rd pl aor subj act or 3rd pl fut ind act) "They will scourge" is mastigoo, which means "to whip", "to flog," and, in the passive, "to be whipped." -- "Scourge" is translated from a Greek word that means "to whip" and "to flog."

maten

μάτην [2 verses](adv) "In vain" is from the Greek maten which means "in vain", "fruitless", "at random", "idly," and "falsely." - The word translated as "in vain," is an adverb that also means "fruitless", "at random", "idly," and "falsely."

mathetes

μαθητὴς (noun sg masc nom) "Disciple" is from mathetes, which means "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." -- "The disciple" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept, but not part of the word itself.

matheteuo,

μαθητευθεὶς [2 verses](part sg aor pass masc nom) "Instructed" is matheteuo, which means "to be a pupil" or "to make a disciple of."   - - "Instructed" is from a verb that means "to be a pupil" or "to make a disciple of." This is the verb form of the word translated as "disciple."

me

μὴ [447 verses](partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. With pres. or aor. subj. used in a warning or statement of fear, "take care" It can be the conjunction "lest" or "for fear that."-- (CW) The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "think" something, not that it isn't done or thought.   With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. This is the negative used with commands or requests.

447
mechri

μέχρι [3 verses](prep/conj/adv) "Until" is from mechri, which means "as far as", "even to", "so far as", "up to", "until", "about," and "nearly."  - The Greek word translated as "until" means "up to," and "until."

mede

μηδὲ [24 verses] (partic) "Neither" is mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not." The negative is the one used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." -- The Greek word for "neither" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even". The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but." As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions. The negative is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.

24
medeis

μηδενὶ [7 verses](adj sg dat) "No man" is from medeis, which means "nobody", "no one", "not even one", "naught", "good for naught," and "nothing."  - The Greek word translated as "no man" here means "no one" and "nothing".

megas

μεγάλου [47 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Great" is megas, which means "big", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "great", "mighty", "strong (of the elements)","loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days). -- The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

47
mege

(particle) "Not" is mege, which is a contraction of me ge. The me is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." The ge is an emphatic particle meaning "at least" and "indeed." It emphasizes the word to which it is associated. --  "Not at all" is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." It is going The ge is an emphatic particle meaning "at least" and "indeed." It emphasizes the word to which it is associated.

meizon

μείζων [22 verses](adj sg masc nom comp ) "Greater" is meizon which means "bigger", "higher", "longer," and "greater" and is the comparative form of megas, which means "big" and "great." The superlative form "greatest" is megistos, μέγιστος.-- "Greatest" is an adjective which is the comparative form of the word meaning "big" or "great." It means "bigger", "higher", "longer", "greater" and simply, "superior." When it is introduced by an article, it means "the greater." It is not the superlative form.

meketi

μηκέτι [4 verses](adv) "Henceforward" is meketi, which means "no more", "no longer," and "no further."  - The word translated as "henceforth" means "no longer." It expresses an opinion. However, in Greek, the double negative doesn't make a positive, like it does in English so when used with a negative, "anymore" works better. 

melas

() "Black" is melas, which means "black", "dark", "murky", "swarthy", "indistinct [of a voice]", "obscure", "enigmatic," and "malignant [of character]."

mello

μέλλει [10 verses] (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Shall" is from mello, which means to "be destined or likely to", "might have, " "must surely have," "to be about to", "to be always going to do", "delay," and "to put off." -- - (WW) "Shall" is a Greek verb, which means "to be destined or likely to", "to be about to do something," or "to intend to" or "to have in mind to." This is not the future tense of the following verb, but the active verb in the clause. The following verb is an infinitive. Jesus only uses this verb in ten verses;

melos

μελῶν [2 verses](noun pl neut gen) "Members" is melos, which means "limb", "feature", "form", "a musical phrase," and "the music to which a song is set." -- The word translated as "member" primarily means "limb." However, it also means a "feature," that is, a part of the whole. However, coupled with the one, it suggests a double entendre for another part of the body that is more like a limb.

men

μὲν [31 verses](partic) "Indeed" is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." Used with the conjunction de, as it is here, it points out the specific word being contrast after the conjunction. In English, we usually say, one one hand...on the others... See the article here for specific uses with other particles. -- The "indeed" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by the "but" phrase.

31
meno

ἔμεινεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "It would have remained" "Dwells" is meno, which, as a verb, it means "stand fast" (in battle), "stay at home", "stay", "tarry", "remain as one was", "abide", and (transitive) "await." -- The word translated as "abide" has more of a sense of to "stay" or "remain," not necessarily dwelling in a place, though the KJV often treats it that way.

mepote

Μήποτε [1 verse](adv) "Not so, lest" is mepote, which means "never", and "on no account". As conjunction, "lest ever." Literally, it means "not when."

1
merimanao

μεριμνᾶτε [6 verses](2nd pl pres imperat act) "Take...thought" is merimanao which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]." -- "Take," with the word "thought" below,  is a Greek verb that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. It is plural and in the form of a command.

merimna

μέριμνα [4 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Cares" is from merimna , which means "care", "thought", "solicitude", "object of care or thought," and, in plural, "pursuit", "ambition."  - "Cares" is translated from a Greek word that means "care", "thought" or "concern." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. However, it is single, not plural.

merimnao

μεριμνήσητε [6 verses](verb 2nd pl fut ind act or verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Take...thought" is merimnao , which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]." -- (WF) "Take" is translated from a Greek word that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. It is in a form that indicates something that might happen at some time. This is not a command as translated, but a statement about what "should" happen.

merizo

μερισθεῖσα [5 verses](part sg aor pass fem nom) "Divided" is merizo, which means "divide", "distribute", "assign", "sever", "cut-off," (passive) "to be divided", "to be dispersed," and "to be reckoned a part."  - "Divided" is a verb, in the form of an adjective which means "to divide", "to spit up," and "to be divided." It is in the passive, so, having been divided, have been split up." This is a rare word for Christ to use, seen only here and in similar verse in Mark (Mark 3:24). An even rarer word is used in Luke (Luke 11:17). 

meros

() "His portion" is meros, which means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes," "proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole). -- "Portion" is a noun that  means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes," "proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole).

mesos

μέσον [11 verses](adj sg masc acc)"The midst" is mesos, which means "middle", "middle point", "midway between", "offered for competition", "deposited," "by the middle", "by the waist", "impartial", "inter-mediate", "indeterminate", "things indifferent (neither good nor bad)", "middling", "moderate", "midst", "intervening space", "intervening", "difference", "in a moderate degree", "in the mean," and "equator." -- The word translated as "the midst" generally means "middle" but has a lot of special meanings with different prepositions. One of those with the "in" is "offer for competition" and "middle point." It also means "difference."

11
mestos

μεστοὶ [1 verse](adj pl masc nom) "Full" is mestos, which means "full of", "laden with," and "sated with."

1
meta

μετὰ [103 verses](prep) "With" is meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to,"  "after", "behind",  and "next afterward." With genitive,  it means generally, "with," "together with," "in the midst of", "among", "between." "in common," "along with," "by the aid of," and "in conjunction with." With dative, "between," "among," "in company with," with a number "complete," and "over and above." With accusative, generally, "among" and "between" as with dative, of motion, "into the middle of," "coming into or among," "in pursuit or quest of," of place, "after," "behind," of time, "after," "next to,"  of worth/rank, "next after," of ideas, "after," "according to."  -- "With" is the Greek word that usually means "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit.

103
metabaino

Μετάβα [3 verses](3rd sg aor ind act) "Remove" is metabaino, which means "to pass over", "pass from one state to another", "change", "make a transition", "to pass to another place or state," and "to carry over." -- The verb translated as "remove" means "to pass over" or "to make a change."

metamellomai

μεταμεληθεὶς [1 verse of 2](participle, passive, aor) "Repent" is metamellomai, which means "to feel repentance", "to repent a thing", "to change one's purpose or conduct," and "to feel regret."  - The word translated as "repent" is not the verb usually translated as "repent" in the NT, but it means "repent" in the sense of feeling regret. It is in the form of a passive adjective, "being made to feel regret."

metanoeo

μετενόησαν. (3rd pl aor ind act) "Repent," is from  metanoeo, which literally means "to perceive afterward", "to perceive too late", "to change one's mind", "to change one's purpose," and "to repent." -- The word translated as "repent" has nothing to do with sin or, generally, with religion or asking for forgiveness. The Greek word translated as "repent" has a primary meaning of understanding something after the fact, with the sense of seeing it is too late. Is specific meaning is to "understand afterward," as seeing the truth after a mistake is made. From this idea, it comes to mean to change your mind, shifting your perspective. This is in the form of a command.

metaxy

μεταξὺ [4 verses](adv)"Between" is metaxy, which means "in the midst" and therefore (of Place) "between," (of Time) "meanwhile," (of Qualities) "intermediate," and (of Degree) "the difference." As a preposition, it takes the genitive case and has the sense of "between" to parties to an agreement or discussion.  - The word translated as "between" is normally an adverb meaning "in the midst" but it has a special use as the preposition meaning "between" in the sense of between two parties to an agreement or discussion. Jesus only uses this word four times, always where the sense of "separating" differentiates it from the common word translated as "between."

mete

μήτε (partic) "Neither" is mete, which means "and not" and "either...or." It is used mostly double. A variation on mede. -- This Greek word translated as "nor" means "neither," "nor,"and not." It is used mostly double as a "neither...nor."

meter

μήτηρ [27 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Mother" is meter, which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin." -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

methos

μεθυόντων, [1 verse](part pl pres act masc gen) "Drunken" is from methos, which means "to be drunken with wine", of things, "to be drenched", "steeped", of persons, "to be intoxicated" with passion or pride, and "to be intoxicated."

1
methos

προσδοκᾷ [2 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind/subj act) "When he looketh" is from prosdokao, which means "expect", "think", "look for," and "suppose."  - The verb translated as "he looketh", it means "expect", "think", "look for," and "suppose."

2
metis

μήτι [3 verses](adv) Untranslated is metis, which is an adverb, meaning "let alone", "much less", "do I [in direct questions], : "let alone", "much less", "lest any one", "lest anything", "that no one," and "that nothing." Or it could be the dative form of the noun meaning "wisdom", "skill", "craft", "counsel", " plan," and "undertaking."

metreo

μετρεῖτε [3 verses](2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye mete" is metreo, which means to "to measure space", "to pass over space", "to traverse space", "to count size or worth", "to measure size or worth," and "to measure out" an amount.  -  - The Greek verb translated as "ye measure" and "it shall be measured" means primarily the measurement of size, but it can means any sort of measurement.

metron

μέτρῳ [4 verses] (noun sg neut dat) "Measure" is metron, which means "that by which anything is measured", "measure", "rule", "measure of content", "any space of measurable length", "limit," and "due measure." -- The word translated as "measure" means any measurement scale, not a specific scale. We use the word "standard" to capture the general idea of a measurement. However, this is another noun form of the following verb, so only the term "measure" worked in English.

mikros

μικρότερος [13 verses](adj sg masc nom comp ) "Little ones" is mikros, which means "small", "little," and "young." It is one of several words Christ uses to refer to children (see this article).  - "Least" is a word that means "small" and "little" applied to anything, size, power, age, quantity, rank, or influence. Christ usually uses it to refer to children. It is in a comparative form, meaning "lesser", not the superlative form. It is one of several words Christ uses to refer to children (see this article). 

milion

μίλιον [unique](noun sg neut acc ) "Mile" is milion, which was the Roman mile, 8 stades, a thousand paces, about 80 yards less than our mile.  -- The word translated as "mile" is the Greek source word for our word and it is surprisingly close to our mile in length, only 240 feet less.

miseo

μισήσει [20 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Hate" is miseo, which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated." -- "Hated" is a Greek verb meaning "to hate." The word is not primarily an emotion as it is in English. Instead, it is a negative state, not being devoted to someone and not liking them. See this article on Greek concepts of love for more information.

20
misthoo

μισθώσασθαι [2 verses](verb aor inf mid) "To hire" is misthoo, which means to "let out for hire," "farm out," "offer to let", "hire," "make a contract (for a thing)", "contract," and "engage (services)."  - "Hire" is from a verb that means to "offer to rent for hire", "to make a contract for hire." Jesus only uses this verb twice, but it has the same root as the noun that is usually translated as "reward".

misthos

μισθὸν [14 times](noun sg masc acc) "Reward" is misthos, which means "hire," "hired service," "for hire," and "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, therefore "pay", "fee", "recompense," and "reward." -- The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "hire," "compensation," "pay," and "recompense," what you receive for doing work. In Jesus's era, compensation was not just money but it took many forms: food, housing, salt, and so on. Jesus saw that there is both spiritual compensation and worldly compensation. It is a reward that is earned. It is not a gift. The verb form of the same root means "hired."

mnaomai

μνησθῇς [2 verses](2nd sg aor subj pass) "Rememberest" is mnaomai, which means "to remind", "to put in mind", "to recall to memory", "to remember," and "to give heed to."  - The Greek verb translated as "rememberest" is in the passive: "you might or should be reminded."

2
mnemeion

μνημεῖα [3 verses]] (noun pl neut acc) "Sepulchres" is mnêmeion, which means "memorial", "remembrance," and "record."  - - (CW) The Greek word translated as "sepulchres" is not the word translated as "sepulchers" in Matthew 23:27, but a word that means "memorial", "remembrance," and "record." Christ does not use the noun frequently, but does use the verb form of this word, which means "to remember."

3
mnemoneuo

μνημονεύετε [6 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind/imperat act) "Remember" is mnemoneuo, which means to "call to mind", "to remember," and "to think of."  - "Remember" is from a verb that means to "call to mind", "to remember," and "to think of."

modios

μόδιον [3 verses](noun sg masc acc)"A bushel" is modios, which measures 7.8 dry quarts about 1/4 of a bushel and vessels, jars or baskets, of that volume. -- The Greek dry measure translated as "bushel" was actually less than a 1/4 the size of our bushel which is 8 dry gallons at only 7.8 dry quarts. "Basket," as in a "bushel basket," is used in more translations, but it also doesn't work to block the light. The most likely measuring vessel in this era would have been a pottery jar.

moi

μοί, (pron 1st sing dat) "Me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek.

moichalis

μοιχαλὶς [3 verses](noun sg fem nom ) "Adulterous" is from moichalis, which is translated from a Greek word for "an adulterous woman." It was also a metaphor for being unfaithful to the gods.  - "Adulterous" is a Greek noun meaning "an unfaithful woman." It is in the same form as the noun ("generation") implying that they are equivalent. The word means  It is a metaphor for those unfaithful to God.

moicheia

μοιχεῖαι, [2 verses](noun pl fem nom) "Adulteries" is moicheia which means "adultery."  - "Adulteries" is from a word that means adultery.

moicheuo

μοιχᾶται. [10 verses] (3rd sg pres ind mp) "Committeth adultery" "Commit adultery" is moicheuo, which means "commit adultery with a woman, " "to debauch a woman," and generally, "to commit adultery with anyone." It is a metaphor for "worshiping idolatrously." -- Christ uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly than its general meaning of having sex with a person not your spouse. He uses it more generally to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray". The word "adultery" was heard differently in Jesus's time than ours own. We know this because Jesus often describes the current generation (or a type of people) as "adulterous.." We assume Jesus wasn't saying that they were cheating on their wives. The broader concept of the time was that "adultery" is anything that is corrupting, as we might say "adulterating." However, the concept is more specific than that. It focuses on activities that violate vows. The central vow in human relationships is the marriage vow.  Violating such vows betrays the one to whom the vow is made and corrupts the person breaking it. In Jewish law, unmarried women could not commit adultery. A vow is required. Using this idea, Jesus connects adultery with the destruction of trust, faithlessness, rather than sex. Therefore, the word is also used to refer to idolatry. Idolatry violates a vow to God.

monophthalmos

μονόφθαλμον [2 verses](adj sg masc acc) "With one eye" is monophthalmoswhich means "one-eyed". -- "One eye" is a long, complicated adjective meaning "one-eyed."

monos

μόνοις; [18 verses](adj pl masc dat) "Only" is monos, which means "alone," "solitary," "only," "single," "unique," "made in one piece," "without [someone]," "only [something]", "unique", "one above all others," and "on one condition only." -- "Only" is an adjective that means "alone," "solitary," "only," "single," "unique," "made in one piece," "without [someone]," "only [something]", "unique", "one above all others," and "on one condition only."

moraino

μωρανθῇ (μωραίνω)[2 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Lost his savour" is moraino, which means "to play a fool", "to act foolishly", "to be silly," and "to be insipid." -- (MM) The Greek word translated as "lost his savor," means "to make a fool," or, in the passive, as it is here, "to be made a fool." The from is something that might take place at some time, as would be assumed with a clause beginning with "when" in English. The choice of this words makes Jesus use of "salt" as a metaphor for wit clear.

moros

μωρῷ, [6 verses](adj sg masc dat) "Foolish" is moros , which means "dull", "stupid", "sluggish," 'insipid", "blind," and "folly." -- The Greek word translated as "fool" means "dull" and "stupid." This Greek word is the basis for the English word "moron", which technically means a mild mental disability. There is no "thou," that is, no second person pronoun here. It seems to be added to make the context of name-calling clearer. The form of the word can only be that which indicates someone being called by this word.

6
mou

μου [132 verses](pron 1st sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which mean "my," or "mine." As a genitive object means movement away from something or a position away from something else. -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."  As a genitive object of a preposition, as here, it means movement away from something or a position away from something else.

132
Moyses

Μωυσῆς [18 verses](Hebrew Name) "Moses" is Moyses, which means "Moses". -- "Moses" is from the Greek spelling of the name for the author of the first five books of the OT. Unlike most Hebrew names, Jesus sometimes adds Greek ending to it in the form of a third declension Greek noun.

18
mylon

μύλῳ, [1 verses](noun sg masc dat) "Mill" is mylon, which means "mill", "millstone", "grinder", "molar", and, generally, "stone".

1
mylos

μύλος [2 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Millstone" is mylos, which means "mill", "millstone", "grinder", "molar," and, generally, "stone."  - "Millstone" is from two Greek words. The first word is any type of "mill", "millstone", "grinder," and "stone." The second word, however, "for a mule." Together, they specifically mean the large millstone that is turned by an ass.

mylos

ὀνικὸς [2 verses](adj sg masc nom) Untranslated is onikos, which means "of an ass," and "for an ass."  --  Untranslated is an adjective that means "of an ass," and "for an ass."

myrios

μυρίων [1 verses]( adj pl masc gen) "Ten thousand" is myrios, which means (of Number) "numberless", "countless", "infinite," (of Size) "measureless", "immense", "infinite," (of time) "incessant," (as a definite number)"ten thousand," and as an Adv. "immensely", "incessantly." It is not from the Greek numbers (10-theka, 1,000=chilia).  - The word translated as "ten thousand" is primarily used generally to express immense and even infinite amounts. It is not from the Greek numbers for "ten thousand," but it came to means that as a definite number.

mysterion

μυστήρια [3 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Mystery" is mystêrion, which means "mystery", "secret doctrine", "secret rite ""mystic implements and ornaments", "secret revealed by God", "religious or mystical truth," and "superstition."  - "Mystery" is from a word that means "mystery", "secret revealed by God," and "superstition." It is specifically the term used for secret religious rites and knowledge.

nai

ναί, [8 verses](adv) "Yes" is nai, which means "yea," "yes", "truly," and similar ideas. -- The word translated as "yea" can be translated as "yes," or "truly". Interestingly, tt is not a common word for Jesus to use.

nekros

νεκρῶν [21 verses](adj pl masc gen)"The dead" is nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic" -- The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter.

21
neos

νέον [8 verses](adj sg neut acc)"New" is neos, which means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". and as an adverb of time, "lately", "just now", "anew," and "afresh," -- "The younger" is the comparative form of the adjective that means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". 

nephele

νεφελῶν [6 verses](noun pl fem gen) "Clouds" is from nephele, which means "clouds", "mist," and "fog."  - clouds  - "Cloud" is from a word that means "clouds", "mist," and "fog." It is a metaphor for death.

6
nepios

νηπίοις: [3 verses](adj pl masc dat) "Babes" is nepios, which means "child", "the young," and "infant." As an adjective referring to understanding, it means "childish", "silly," 'without foresight", "blind," and, to strength "like that of a child."​  - "Babes" is a noun that means "baby" or "infant" and, as an adjective that, when referring to understanding, means "childish" and "silly".

nesteuo

νηστεύσουσιν. [10 verses](3rd pl fut ind act or 3rd pl aor subj act) "Fast" is nesteuo, which means "fast" and "to abstain from."  - The term translated as "fast" specifically means a religious fast. The verb is in the future tense or a form indicating something that might occur in the future.

nestis

νήστεις [2 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Fasting" is nestis, which means "not eating", "fasting", "causing hunger," and "starving."   - - (CW) "Fasting" is from an adjective which means "not eating", "fasting", "causing hunger," and "starving." This is not the common word translated as "fasting."

netho

() "Spin" is netho, which means " to spin."

Nineuites

Νινευεῖται [3 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Nineveh" is from Nineuites which is the Greek from of the kingdom's name from the story of Jonah.   - "Nineveh" is  the Greek of the kingdom in the story of Jonah.

nipto

() "Wash" is nipto, which means specifically "to wash hands or feet," and generally "to clean", "to purge," and "to wash off."

Noe

Νῶε, [4 verses](Hebrew name) "Of Noah" is Noe, which is the Greek form of the name of Noah.  - "Noah" is the Greek spelling of the Hebrew name. 

4
noeo

νοεῖτε [8 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Perceive" is from noeo, means specifically "perceive by the eyes", "observe," "to perceive with the mind", "apprehend", "think out, "devise", "consider," (of words) "bear a certain sense," and "reflect." -- "Do ye...understand" is from a verb that means "to perceive with the eyes", "to perceive with the mind," and "to observe." We use the word "see" to have the same sense of physical seeing and perceiving with the mind. This is the root word for the key word in Jesus's teaching that gets translated as "repent" but which actually means "change your mind."  There are several words translated as "understand" in the Gospels, but this word might be closest.

nomizo

ἐνόμισαν [3 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "They supposed" is nomizo, which primarily means "to use by custom" or "to be accustomed to." Secondarily, it means "to own", "to acknowledge", "to hold in honor," and "to believe." It is usually translated as "think" in the Gospels but in the sense of having specific expectations.  - The verb translated as "they supposed" is a verb form of the Greek word for "the law." For a legislator, it means to enact a law, but that is not its primary meaning, which is "to be used by custom" and "to be accustomed to." It is usually translated as "think" in the Gospels but in the sense of having specific expectations. Secondarily, it means "to own", "to acknowledge", "to hold in honor," and "to believe."

nomos

νόμος [16 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Law" is nomos, which means "anything assigned", "a usage", "custom", "law", "ordinance," or "that which is a habitual practice." It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal." -- The Greek word translated as "law" describes the social norms, which can be from "tradition", "common practice," or the "laws." Jesus uses it to refer to the first five books of the OT written by Moses. He did not use it to refer to civl or Roman law. See this article.

16
notos

νότου  [4 verses](noun sg masc gen) "South" is from notos, which means "south wind", "south", "south-west quarter", "south of," and the "god personifying the south wind."  -  - "South" is the Greek word that means "south wind", "south", "south-west quarter", "south of," and the "god personifying the south wind."

nymphios

νυμφίος; [9 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Bridegroom" is nymphios, which means "bridal", "bridegroom" and "son-in-law."  - The word translated as "the bridegroom" is a male form of the adjective meaning "bridal," hence, "groom" or "son-in-law."

9
nymphon

νυμφῶνος [4 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Of the bridechamber" is from nymphon, which can either be the room of the marriage bed or marriage ceremony. One form of this word means "bridegroom" and another "bride."  - The term translated "of the bridal chamber" means simply "wedding room" and can refer either to the place of the wedding or to the bridal chamber.

nyn

νῦν [31 verses](adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is." -- The Greek word translated as "now" means "now", "at the present moment","presently," and "as it is."

31
nyx

νύκτας,” [11 verses] (noun pl fem acc) "Nights"  is from nyx, which means "night", "midnight", and is a metaphor for darkness. -- "Nights"  is the noun that means "night", "midnight", and is a metaphor for darkness. --

11
o

(exclam)  "O" is from o, which is an exclamation "O!" -- "Oh!" is used as a mode of address.  

odin

ὠδίνων. [2 times](noun pl fem gen) "Sorrows" is ôdin, which means specifically the "pain or throes of childbirth", "children", in singular, "that which is born amid throes"," "child," It is a metaphor for "anguish" but with the specific sense of suffering that bears fruit, "fruit of" the mind's "travail". This is very different from the sorrow we feel at death, which is what the term "sorrows" in the context of war and natural disaster seems to indicate.

2
odous

ὀδόντα [8 verses](noun sg masc acc) "A tooth" is from odous, which means "tooth", "anything pointed", "prong", "spike", "peak," and "tooth [of a saw]." It is a metaphor for the pain of grief. -- The Greek word translated as "tooth" means "tooth" but it is a metaphor for the opposite of comfort and cheer, the pain of grief. Jesus uses the "grinding of teeth" as evidence for suffering in verses such as Matthew 13:42.

oida

οἶδεν [38 verses](3rd sg perf ind act) "Know" is oida which is a form of eido (ἴδω) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." -- The word translated as "know" means primarily "to see" and is used to mean "know' as we use the word "see" to mean "know" in English.

oikia

οἰκίᾳ [40 times](noun sg fem dat) "House" is oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household." -- The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. We might say "estate" in English to capture this idea.

oikodespotês

οἰκοδεσπότης [12 verses](noun sg masc gen) "Goodman of the house" is from oikodespotês , which is the "master of the house" and also means "steward of a house," and "native ruler." It is a combination of two words. The first part is from oikia, which means "building", "house", "family," and "household," and the second is despotes, which means "master" and "lord" but it isn't the word normally translated as "lord" in the Gospels. -- "Goodman of the house" is from a compound Greek word that is literally the "master of the house." It was translated as "householder."

oikodomeo

οἰκοδομήσω [18 verses]( verb 1st sg fut ind act ) "I will build" is oikodomeo,which means to "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." --- "Ye build" is a word that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." The English word "construct" may come closest.

oikos

οἶκον [29 verses](noun sg masc acc)"House" is oikos, which means "house", "dwelling place", "room", "home", "meeting hall", "household goods", "substance," and "ruling family." It is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. -- The Greek word translated as "house," is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. It means the household or clan that lives in the building as well.

oikoumene

οἰκουμένῃ [2 verses](noun sg fem dat) "The world" is oikoumene, which means "the inhabited region." It was often used to denote the civilized world as separate from the lands of barbarians.

2
oinopotês

οἰνοπότης,[2 verses] (noun sg masc nom) "Wine bibber" is oinopotês, which means "wine drinker."- The Greek word translated as "wine bibber" is a noun that means "wine drinker." Jesus only uses this word only twice, here and in the parallel in Luke. It is from the common verb that means "drink" and the word for "wine."

oinopotês

οἰνοπότης,[2 verses] (noun sg masc nom) "Wine bibber" is oinopotês, which means "wine drinker."- The Greek word translated as "wine bibber" is a noun that means "wine drinker." Jesus only uses this word only twice, here and in the parallel in Luke. It is from the common verb that means "drink" and the word for "wine."

oinos

() "Wine" is oinos, which means "wine" and "fermented juice of any kind." -- The word translated as "wine" means "wine" or any fermented juice. Wine, however, is Christ's metaphor for mental thought, the drink affecting the mind. More about this in this article.

oketeia

οἰκετείας [2 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Household" is from oketeia, which means "household of slaves", "servitude", and "slave population."  - The word translated as "household" a"household of slaves", "servitude", and "slave population". It is not from the word for "household" that means all the people and property in the house.

2
oligopistos

ὀλιγόπιστοι;[6 verses] (adj pl masc/fem voc ) "Ye of little faith" is oligopistos, which means literally, "small trust." It is a word built of two words. From oligos, which means "little", "small", "slight", "few," and "weak." As an adverb it means "a little", "slightly," and "little." "Faith" is pistis, which means "confidence", "assurance", "trustworthiness", "credit", "a trust," "that which give confidence," and, as a character trait, "faithfulness." -- "Unbelief" is a word that means small or little trust.

oligos

ὀλίγοι: [19 verses](adj pl masc nom)"Small" is oligos, which means "little", "small", "slight", "few," and "weak." As an adverb it means "a little", "slightly," and "little."  -  The Greek word translated as "few" means "little", "small", "slight", "few," and "weak."

19
omnyo

ὀμόσαι [7 verses] (2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Swear" is from omnyo, which means "to swear to a thing", "to take an oath", "to promise one will", "give word of honor", "swear by," and "affirm or confirm by oath." This word appears 155 times in the Septuagint, translating the Hebrew word is שָׁבַע shaba  -- The word translated here as "swear" means "to swear on a thing" and "to promise one will". The command is singular, that is, a singular you. This follows the form of the commands given earlier in the verse. Its form also indicates something that the subject does for or to themselves.

7
oneidizo

ὀνειδίσωσιν [2 verses] (3rd pl aor subj act) "Revile" is oneidizo, which means "to cast in [one's teeth]", "to make a reproach", "to reproch," "to upbraid," and "to chide." -- -- The Greek verb translated as "revile" means "to chide" and it is translated elsewhere in the Gospels as "upbraid." We would say "scod."

onoma

ὄνομα [47 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as it does in English, but it doesn't mean the things themselves, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." See this article for more.

onos

ὄνον [2 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Ass" is from onos, which  means "ass", the common beast of burden. Like the English term, it carries a certain sense of derision in Greek. However, it was also part of many different sayings. -- The word translated as "ass" means an "ass" as a beast of burden. It is also used in humor and many sayings. The effect here seems primarily humorous, perhaps referring to someone making noise in the audience.

opheile

ὀφειλὴν [1 verse](noun sg fem acc) "Debt" is opheile, which means "debt." - -- The Greek word translated as "debt" is a noun that means "debt." Jesus used four different nouns and two verbs to describe "debt," almost all are related (except one), different forms of the same root. This is the simplest from the root.

opheilema

ὀφειλήματα [1 verse](noun pl neut acc) "Debts" is opheilema, which means "that which is owed," and "debt." -- This word "debts" is sometimes translated as "sins" or "trespasses," but in the original Greek, it has only one meaning, "that which is owed." In this respect, the KJV is more accurate than more recent translations that render it differently for philosophical reasons.

opheiletes

ὀφειλέτης [4 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Which owed""Debtors" is opheiletes, which means "a debtor", "a person who owes a debt" or "one who is under a bond." -- The word for "debtor" is a form of the word for "debt" used above. It means someone who owes something, that is, someone who was under a bond. In Christ's era, a person under a bond was almost a slave until the debt was paid.

opheilo

ὤφειλεν [5 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Owed" is opheilô, which means "to owe", "to have to pay", "to be bound to render", "to be bound", "to be obliged," and "to account for."  - "Owed" are from a Greek verb that means "to owe", "to have to pay," and "to account for."

opheleo

ὠφεληθῇς, [8 verses](verb 2nd sg aor subj pass contr) "Profiteth" is opheleo, which means "to help", "to aid", "to succor", "to be of use or service," "to enrich," and "to benefit." -- The Greek word translated as "profiteth" in the KJV (and "accomplishes" or "is" in other translations) means "to help" or "to be of benefit."

ophis

ὄφεις [7 verses](noun pl masc voc/nom/acc) "Serpents"is ophis, which means "serpent", "a serpent-like bracelet", "a specific constellation", "a creeping plant," and "a type of fish." It is a metaphor for "an arrow." -- The word translated as "serpent" is also a kind of fish. The "serpent" was used by Jesus both as a metaphor for wisdom (Mat.10:16) and, of course, an evil cunning. This is a reference to the Hebrew in Genesis 3:1, where the serpent is described as the cleverest of all animals. The bronze or brass snake raised by Moses in the desert to cure the Israelites from snakebite is an symbol for Christ being raised on the cross, John 3:14.

7
ophthalmos

Ὀφθαλμὸν [26 verses](noun sg masc acc)"Eye" is ophthalmos, which means "eye", "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]." -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". In Greek, an eye is a metaphor for comfort and cheer.

opiso

ὀπίσω [15 verses](prep/adv) "Back" is from opiso, which means "back", "behind," and "hereafter." -- The term translated as "back" means "back" in space but "after" in time. It is followed by a possessive which tells us whose back it is.  The logic regarding time is that, since the future is unseen, it should be regarded as behind us, whereas the past is known and therefore before our eyes. This seems quite strange to English speakers, but the use of this word in Greek is well-established to mean "future". Our English view coincides with the ancient Greek when discussing books. The "back" of the book in English means the "end" of the book, which is the future for the reader. This use of "back" is identical to the Greek.

optanomai

ὄψονται [13 verses](verb 3rd pl fut ind mid) "Shall see""Shall see" is optanomai, which means "to see", "to look", "to aim at", "to look towards", "to have sight", "to take heed," (in transitive) "to behold", "to perceive", "to observe", "to look out for," and "to be seen (passive)." It is a metaphor for mental sight, "to perceive", "to discern", "to see visions", "to appear in visions (passion), and "to interview." -- "Shall see" is a verb that means "to see", "to look", "to aim at", "to look towards", and similar meanings.  This is not one of the two most common words that Jesus means to means "to see," but this word also has the sense of referring to mental sight and visions. 

13
orgizo

ὀργισθεὶς [6 verses](part sg aor pass masc nom) "Was wroth" is orgizo, which means "to be made angry", "to be provoked to anger," and "to be irritated." -- Angry" is from a Greek verb that means "to be made angry", "to be provoked to anger," and "to be irritated."

ornis

ὄρνις [5 verses] (noun sg masc/fem nom) "A hen" is ornis, which means "bird," including birds of prey and domestic fowls, "bird of omen," a metaphor for "omen" taken from the flight or cries of birds, "cock", "hen," and "fowl." This is the more formal word for bird, the source of our word for the study of birds, "ornithology."  - The word translated as "hen" is the general, formal word for "bird," in Greek. It includes birds of prey and domestic fowls. This is not the word Jesus more commonly uses for birds, which literally means "wing ones." Nor does it mean a female bird, being in a form that can mean either male or female.

5
oros

ὄρους [10 verses](noun sg neut gen) "Mountain" is oros, which means "mountain", "hill", "canton," and "parish." In Egypt, it was also used to mean the "desert" and a place of burial. It's homonym oros means a "boundary", "landmark", "time limits", "decisions of judges", "memorial stones and pillars," "standard", "measure", "term (in logic)", "definition", "terms," and "conditions." Another, similar word, oreus, which matches oros in some forms means "mule." --The word translated as "mountain" means "mountain" or "hill" but it could also be the word that means "mule." The word is in a form that could indicating the person address, but that form has a number of uses and isn't suggest by the form of the following verb. 

osteon

ὀστέων [2 verses] (noun pl neut gen) "Bones" are osteon, which means "bone", "stone" of a fruit," and metaphorically, "stones."  - The word translated as "bones" primarily means "bones." It is a common word, but uncommon for Christ.

2
ou

οὐκ [269 verses](partic) "Not" is ou ( οὒ ) which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no", "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

269
ou me

οὐ μὴ [39 verses](partic) "Never" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

39
ouai

Οὐαί [27 verses](exclam)"Woe" is ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas" but it can be used sarcastically. -- "Woe" is an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." However, Christ seems to use it humorously. Every verse in which it appears have the hallmarks of Christ's humor. Today we would say "so sad [for you]" or "boo-hoo to you." The word is very like the Jewish, "oy veh" which can be used to express sorry but with is more commonly used cynically. More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

ouchi

οὐχὶ [23 verses](adv) "Not" is ouchi, an adverb which means "no", "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," "notwithstanding", "yet", "still", "never yet", "for not", "indeed", "for surely not", "no,—certainly not", "for I don't suppose," and "for in no manner." -- The word translated as "not" is a different form of the usual Greek negative of fact meaning "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," and "notwithstanding."

oude

οὐδὲ [51 verses](partic) "Neither" is oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not", "neither", and "nor." As an adverb, it means "not at all" and "not even."-- The Greek word for "neither" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even". As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions.

oudeis

οὐδὲν [69 verses](adj sg neut nom /acc) "Nothing"" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." -- The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

oudepote

Οὐδέποτε [5 verses](adv) "Never" is oudepote, which means "and not ever", "but not when", "nor ever", "not even ever," and "never." It is a compound of oude, and pote. Oude, as a conjunction, means "but not", "neither", and "nor." As an adverb, it means "not at all" and "not even."  Pote means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future.  - "Never" is from a Greek word that combine an extreme negative particle with the word that means "when." The Greek negative is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even".  The second part means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

ouketi

οὐκέτι [17 verses](adv) "Henceforth" is ouketi, which means "no more", "no longer", "no further" and generally, "not now."  -- "Henceforth" is an adverb that means "no more", "no longer", "no further" and generally, "not now."

oun

οὖν [82 verses](adv) "Therefore" is oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore." -- The Greek word translated as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative, "then," "therefore." Jesus uses it to respond positively to questions, but in parables, it can continue the story.

oupo

οὔπω [9 verses](adv) "Not..yet" is from oupo, which means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all." -- "Not yet" is an adverb that means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

ouranios

οὐράνιος [7 verses](adj sg masc nom) "Heavenly" is ouranios, which is the adjective form of heaven meaning means "heavenly," dwelling in heaven " and as a metaphor, "colossal." -- "Heavenly" is not the noun form but the adjective, "heavenly" \introduced by an article, "the heavenly" or "the heavenly one". The word translated as "heaven" was the word used by the Greeks to refer to the universe outside of the planet. See this article for more perspective on the word and how Jesus uses it.

ouranos

οὐρανῶν [111 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Of Heaven" is the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate." -- The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.

ous

ὦτα (noun pl neut acc) "Ears" is from ous, which means "ear" and things that resemble an ear, such as a handle on pitchers, cups, etc. -- The term translated as "ears" means "ear," things resembling a handle and is a metaphor for understanding.

ousia

οὐσίαν [2 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Of goods" is ousiawhich means "that which is one's own", "one's substance", "property", "substance", "essence", "true nature", "substantiality", and in magic, "a material thing by which a connection is established between the person to be acted upon and the supernatural agent."

2
oute

οὔτε [12 verses](partic) "Neither" is oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series. -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

12
pachuno

ἐπαχύνθη [1 verse](verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Waxed gross" is from pachuno, which means to "thicken", "strengthen", "make gross or dull," metaph., "cause to wax fat," and "increase." In the passive, it means "to be coarsened", "to become thick," of fruit juices, "become concentrated", "to be dulled (of the sun's light)," and "to grow fat." It is also a metaphor for "to become stupid."  - "Waxed gross" is from a verb that means many things such as "to thicken", "to strengthen," and "to increase." It has both positive and negative meanings, but in the passive, as it appears here, most of its meaning is more negative "to become thick", "to become dull," and is a metaphor for "to become stupid." However, one of its basic meanings, "to become fat" was not seen in the negative in Christ's era as it is in developed nation's today.

paidion

(noun sg fem nom) "Children" is paidion. which means "little child" or "young child," (up to seven years) "infant" or "young slave." -- The Greek word translated as "children" means "little child" and refers to children younger than seven. It is one of several words Jesus uses to refer to children, see this article.

paidon

παιδία, [13 verses](noun pl neut nom/acc/voc) "Children" is paidon. which means "little child" or "young child," (up to seven years) "infant" or "young slave."  - "Children" is translated from a Greek word that means "a young child" or "little child." It is one of several words that Jesus uses that are translated as "child" or "children." (See this article.) One unique aspect of this word is that it is neither masculine or feminine, but neuter. What is the difference between a young child and an older child? Young children live much more "in the moment" than older ones do. They do not see the world through a layer of assumptions. They accept that they don't know anything about the world, but they are excited to discover what the world holds.

pais

παῖς [2 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Servant" is pais, which means in relations to age,  "child" of either sex, and, in relation to condition, "slave" or "servant."  - Though translated as "servant," this word more likely means "child." Jesus clearly uses it to mean "child" when addressing a young girl and the other times it is used in the gospels, it could mean "child" as well.

palai

πάλαι [2 verses](adv) "Long ago" is from palai, which means "long ago", "long ", " of old," "before", "just past," and similar ideas. With present, means something lasting to the present. With past, something lasting to the past.  -  "Long ago" is an adverb means "long ago", "long ", " of old," "before", "just past," and similar ideas.

palaios

παλαιούς: [8 verses](adj pl masc acc) "Old" is palaios, which means "old in years," "ancient," (in a good sense) "venerable", "held in esteem," (in a bad way) "antiquated", "obsolete," and "in an old way." -- The word translated as "old" means old in years both in a good sense and a bad one. In a good sense, it means "venerable" and in a bad sense, "obsolete."

paliggenesia

παλινγενεσίᾳ, [1 verse](noun sg fem dat) "Regeneration" is paliggenesia, which means "rebirth", "regeneration", "beginning of a new life", "restoration (of world)," and "reincarnation (of a person)."  - "Regeneration" is from a noun that means "rebirth", "regeneration", "beginning of a new life", "restoration," and "reincarnation." The can mean anything from the reincarnation of a person to the rebirth of an age or world.

palin

Πάλιν [23 verses](adv) "Again" is palin, which means "back", "backward", "contradiction", "again", "once more," and "in turn."-- The Greek word translated as "again" means "back," "again," and "contradiction."

pantos

(adv) "Surely" is from pantos, an adverb which means "in all ways", "especially", "absolutely", "no doubt", "by all means", and with the negative ou, "in no way", and "by no means". 

pantote

πάντοτε [8 verses](adverb) "Always" is from pantote, which means "always," "at all time", and literally breaks down to "all then." "All" is from pas- that means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." "Then" is from -tote, which means "at that time" and "then." -- The word translated as "always" means "at all times" but what makes it interesting is that Christ seldom uses this word but it occurs twice in this verse. Most people uses the terms "always" whenever they discuss something that it done frequently. Christ never makes this mistake. He also uses the word for "never" (in the sense of "at not time") just as rarely.

8
para

παρὰ  (prep) "With" is para, has many meanings, which depend on the case of its object and the sense of the verb.With the genitive, the sense is always motion, "from the side of," "from beside," "issuing from", and generally "from." With the dative, the sense is always static, "by the side of," "near," "in the presence of," and "before." With the accusative, its has a number of specialized meanings depending on the character of the verb, with coming/going "near," "beside," with placing "side-by-side," as a metaphor, "like" or "as a parody of, of comparison, "compared with" and many more including "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)." -- The Greek preposition translated as "from" has many meanings, many of which depend on the case of its object. With the genitive, the sense is motion, "from the side of," "from beside," and generally "from." With the dative, the sense is static, "by the side of," "near," and "before." With the accusative, its has a number of specialized meanings depending on the character of the verb, with coming/going "near," "beside," with placing "side-by-side," as a metaphor, "like" or "as a parody of, of comparison, "compared with" and many more.

parabole

παραβολαῖς [12 verses](noun pl fem dat)  "Parable" is from parabole, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy." It is most often translated in the NT as "parable" but occasionally as "comparison." -- "Parable" is Greek for "analogy", "comparison," and "illustration." It doesn't mean simply "educational story" as it has come to mean in English. The fact that Christ speaks in analogies and illustrations is critical in understanding His words.

12
paradidomi

παραδῶσιν [43 verses](3rd pl aor subj act)"Deliver you up" is paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow." -- "Shall deliver up" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

43
paradosis

παράδοσιν [5 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Tradition" is paradosis, which means literally "to give over" and it used to mean "handing over" and "passing down." It is used to mean the "transmission" of legends, "bequeathing" of an inheritance," or that which is handed down such as "tradition", "doctrine," or "teaching.  - - "Tradition" is from a noun which means literally "handing over" and it used to mean "handing over" and "passing down." It is used to mean the "transmission" of legends, "bequeathing" of an inheritance," or that which is handed down such as "tradition", "doctrine," or "teaching." "Bequest" seems to capture it best in English.

parakaleo

παρακληθήσονται.” [6 verses](verb 3rd pl fut ind pass) "Will be comforted" is parakaleo which means "call in", "send for", "invite," "summon", "address", "demand", "exhort", "encouraged", "excite", "demand," and "beseech." It means literally "call closer." The prefix, para, means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond" and so on. The based word kaleo, means "call", "summon", and "invite".  - The word translated as "mourn" is a participle of the the Greek verb meaning "to wail" and "to lament." This word is closely associated with the idea of mourning. 

paralambano

παραλαμβάνει [8 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind) "Taketh" is from paralambano, which means "to receive from", "to take upon oneself", "to take to oneself," and "to associate oneself." -- "Taketh with" is a Greek verb that means "to receive from", "to take upon oneself", "to take to oneself," and "to associate oneself." It is a compound verb, with a prefix meaning "beside" and to common verb primarily meaning "get," but usually translated as in the KJV as "receive."

8
paratoma

παραπτώματα [2 verses](noun pl neut acc) Trespasses" is paratoma, which means "false step", "slip", "blunder", "defeat", "transgression", "trespass," and "error in amount of payments."  -- The "trespasses"  does not mean violating the property rights of another. It simply means "false step", "misstep", or "blunder," though it also has an economic meaning of "an error in payment." For more about all these words, you may want to read this article (same as the one above) that explains their use. This word is used to mean going off the right path, or, more specifically, stumbling off that path. It means literally means "falling beside" the path.

pareimi

πάρει. [2 verses](verb 2nd sg pres ind act) "Come" is from pareimi, which means "to be present", "to be near," and "to be ready."  - The uncommon word translated as "come" means "to be near" and "to be present." It is not the word commonly translated as "come" in the Gospels.

2
parektos

παρεκτὸς (παρέξ) [1 verse](adv )"Saving" is parektos, which means "beside" or "except." -- The Greek word translated as "saving" means "out beside," "besides," "except," "exclusive of," "beside" or "except." Jesus only uses this word here. This form is not used outside of the Bible and one other Greek document referencing the Bible. The correct Greek spelling, pares, does appear thirteen times though it is not defined in Strong's.

parerchomai

παρελεύσεται, [5 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall...pass away" is parerchomai, which means "go by", "pass by", "outstrip" (in speed), "pass away", "outwit", "past events" (in time), "disregard", "pass unnoticed," and "pass without heeding." -- The word "pass " is from a verb that means  means one thing going by another, one thing surpassing by another,  or the "passing" the time. It also has the sense of arriving to a place and to "pass" a test. The form is not the future tense, as translated, but in a form that means something is possible and "should" or "might" happen. It does not mean "pass away" as in dying.

5
paromoiazo

παρομοιάζετε [1 verse] (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye are like" is paromoiazo, which means "to be like" and "to be much like." This word is most often used is works about writing and elecution.  - The word translated as "ye are like" is from a verb that means "to be like" and "to be much like." This is NOT the verb that Jesus commonly uses in all the "the kingdom of heaven is like" verses. This word is a more academic word and indicates more of a likeness that the metaphorical similarity of the more common word.

1
paropsis

παροψίδος, [2 verses]](noun sg fem gen) Platter" is paropsis, which means "platter on which meat is served." It is a metaphor for "fresh tastes."

2
parousia

παρουσία [3 verses] (noun sg fem nom) "The coming" is parousia, which means "presence", "arrival", "occasion", "situation", "substance", "property," and "contribution." It is from the present participle of the verb pareimi, meaning "to have arrived" and "to be present," from para eimi, literally, "being by."   - - (CW) The word translated as "coming" means "presence", "arrival", "occasion", "situation", "substance", "property," and "contribution." It is an uncommon word, only used by Jesus in this section of Matthew. It was first used in the apostle's question about the "coming" of the end of the world that we discuss in Matthew 24:3. Since it is not related to the word usually translated as "come" in the NT, "arrival" but the apostles clearly used it to mean "presence." It has nothing to do with the verb usually translated as "coming." It is from the present participle of the verb meaning "to have arrived" and "to be present."

3
parthenos

παρθένοις, [3 verses] (noun pl fem dat) "Virgins" is from parthenos, which means a "maiden", "girl", "virgin", "unmarried woman who isn't a virgin", "unmarried man," and as an adjective, meaning "maiden," and "chaste."  - The Greek word translated as "virgins means a "maiden" but today we would say "teenager." Here it is specifically "teenage girls." The term relates more to age than sexual experience since it can describe a young woman who is not a virgin. This term is only used in the parable of the ten teenagers invited to a party.

3
pas

πᾶς [212 verses](adj sg masc nom) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

pascho

πάσχειν [8 verses](verb pres inf act) "Suffer" is pascho, which means "to have something happen to one," "to have done to one", "to be treated so," and "to come to be in a state."  - "Suffer" is from a verb that means "to have done to one", "to be treated so," and "to come to be in a state."

passo

() "All" is passo, which means "to sprinkle."

pater

πατὴρ [191 verses](noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

patris

πατρίδι [3 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Country" is from patris, which means "of one's father's" and "ones fatherland," and "country." -- The Greek word translated as "country" is a noun that means "of your fathers" so "fatherland". 

pechys

πῆχυν [2 verses] (noun sg masc acc )"Cubit" is from pechys, "which means "forearm", "arm", "the centerpiece joining the two horns of the bow", "horns of the lyre", "crosspiece or bridge of a horn", "balance beam," and "distance from the point of the elbow to that of the middle finger," which was a little of 20 inches. -- The word translated as "cubit" means "forearm," which is the measure of length used in a cubit, which is 1 1/2 ft., 18 inches. So we have a conflict here between a measure of length, 18 inches, being added or applied to a measure of age. This is why some Bibles translate this phrase as adding inches to a height, others adding time to our lives.

peino

ἐπείνασεν [9 verses] (3rd sg aor ind act ) "Was an hungered" is peino, which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.  - "Hungered" is from a Greek verb that means "to be hungry" or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.

peirasmos

() "Temptation" is peirasmos, which means a "trial", "worry," and only by extension "temptation." -- The Greek word translated as "temptation" doesn't primarily means that. It means a "trial" as in a "worry." Christ doesn't use this term but another Greek word to refer to court trials. It could mean a "trial" as a "test." Again, this is an uncommon word in Christ's teaching.

peirazo

πειράζετε, [7 verses](2nd pl pres ind act) "Tempt" is peirazo, which means to "make proof or trial of", "attempt" to do, "to attempt", "to try", "to test," and, in a bad sense, "to seek to seduce," and "to tempt."  - The word translated as "tempting" primarily means "testing." That meaning works better here. The KJV translators prefer the "tempting" translation where ever this word is used.

7
pempo

πέμψας [39 verses](part sg aor act masc nom) "He sent forth" is pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort." -- "He sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out."

39
pentakischilioi

πεντακισχιλίων [2 verses](adj pl masc gen) "Five thousand" is pentakischilioi, which means "five thousand." -- This Greek word means five thousand.

pente

πέντε [12 verses](numeral) "Five" is from pente, the number five."Five" is pente, the number five. -- This is the Greek word for the number five

pentekonta

(numeral) "Fifty" is from pentekonta, which means "fifty".  -- "Fifty" is the Greek nemeral fifty. 

pentheo

πενθεῖν [3 verses](pres inf act) "Mourn" is pentheo, which means "to bewail", "to mourn", "to go into mourning," and "to lament."  - "Mourn" is a Greek word that means "to bewail", "to mourn", "to go mourning" and "to lament." It is the same word used for "mourn" in the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:4).

pera

() "Bag" is pera, which means a "leather pouch to carry food", "a bag for traveling," or "a wallet." -- "Scrip" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack.

peri

περὶ [73 verses](prep)  "As touching" is peri, which means "round about (Place)", "around", "about", "concerning", "on account of", "in regard to", "before", "above", "beyond," and "all around." -- The Greek word translated as "of" means "around" when referring to a place, but in referring to a subject, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Jesus usually uses it.

73
periago

περιάγετε [1 verse] (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye compass" is periago, which means "to lead around", "to lead about with oneself", "carry about for sale," "to go about", "to walk about," turn round," "turn about", "pass round," "protract", "bring round to", "around" a period, "cause to revolve," and in the passive, "to rotate."

1
periballo

περιβαλώμεθα; [7 verses] (1st pl aor subj mid) "Was arrayed" is periballo, which means "to throw around", "to put on", "to encompass", "to surround", "to bring under one's power", "amplify", "expand", "appropriate mentally", "comprehend", "to excel", "to surpass", "throw beyond," and "beat in throwing." In the passive, it means "to have put around oneself." "to be involved in," and "to have come into possession of one." - The word translated as "shall we be clothed" means "to throw around" or "to expand" or "excel." The best translation is "wrapped" because Jesus doesn't always use this verb se to refer to refer to clothing.

peripateo

περιπατοῦσιν, [(3rd pl pres ind act) "Walk" is peripateo, which means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching." -- "Walk" is a Greek verb that means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching." Jesus uses it somewhat humorously in the sense that we use "parade." 

perisseuma,

περισσεύματος [2 verses](noun sg neut gen) "Abundance" is perisseuma, which means "superfluidity", "that which remains over," and "abundance." It is from the root, perissos , which means "exceeding some measure or rank."  - "Abundance" is an adjective used as a noun which means "superfluidity", "that which remains over," and "abundant."

perisseuo

περισσευθήσεται: [7 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Hav