Mat 7:25 And the rain descended, and the floods came,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 7:25 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And, it came down...the rain. And they showed up...the floods. And they blew...the winds. And they fell on...house, that one, and no, it doesn't fall. Because it had its foundations laid on the rock.

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse is such a good example of Christ's use of word order to create great story-telling and little jokes. It is also as an example used in the article on the difference between spoken and written language because it works much better spoken than written. All of this is lost in the KJV translation.

The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The word translated as "rain" primarily means "rain" but it also has the sense of irrigation flooding. This appears later in the Greek than in the KJV translation.

The word translated as "descended" but it means "fell down". This creates a play on word that works because when this word appears in the Greek, we do not know what fell down and would assume the house.

The word translated as "floods" means a "river," and similar existing bodies of water.

The word translated as "came" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being under way."

The word translated as "the winds" means both the physical wind and the directions from which the wind comes.

The word translated as "blew" primarily means "to blow" and "to breath," and comes from the same root as a common Greek word for "wind", "breath," and "spirit."

The Greek word translated as "beat upon" means literally "fall towards" and usually means to "sit by."

The word translated as "that" means specifically "that person." Christ tends to use it, as here, referring to a person mentioned earlier.

The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

The word translated as "it fell" primarily means "to fall" but like our English word, it has a large number of special uses.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact but adding "really" captures some of its feeling in English.

The Greek term translated as "was founded" is a verb meaning "to build a foundation" or "to found firmly." It is in a form which indicates the subject acting on itself.

The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence. In spoken language, we would just say "because".

The Greek word translated as "rock" also means specifically a "high cliff over the sea." Both the height and its position over the sea are related symbols.

Wordplay: 

All of the word order here is playing with words, putting the verbs before the nouns to keep the audience in suspense. See end of the section on "word order" in this article where it is explained. 

The Spoken Version: 

Then he said, “And, it fell down—.”
Most laughed, thinking that he meant the house.
Then he added, “The rain!” He illustrated the fall of rain with his fingers.
This generated new laughter.
“And they showed up—,” he said sourly.
Many laughed, thinking that he meant the Dedicated.
“The floods,” he continued, sweeping his arms around like swirling waters.
People laughed and hooted.
“And they blew—,” he said puffing out his cheeks.
Most laughed, but no one knew what to think.
“The winds,” he continued as if it was obvious. “And they fell against that house.” He held his hands apart and shook them as if they were the wind shaking a house. “And, no!” He exclaimed, adding slowly. “It. Does. Not. Fall!” He paused, then explained, “Because? It was built on rock!”

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κατέβη (3rd sg aor ind act) "Descended" is from katabaino, which means "go down", "come down from," and "dismount from." Metaphorically, it means "attain", "conform to", "condescend", "fall in value," and "arrive at the end [of a speech]."

βροχὴ (noun sg fem nom) "Rain" is from broche, which means "rain" "moistening", "steeping (in brewing)", "inundation (of the Nile)," and "irrigation."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἦλθαν (3rd pl aor ind act) "Came" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

οἱ ποταμοὶ (noun pl masc nom) "Floods" is from potamos, which means "river", "stream", "artificial river," and "canal."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔπνευσαν (3rd pl aor ind act) "Blew" is from pneo, which means "blow", "breath", "give off an odor", "breath forth," and "breath out."

οἱ ἄνεμοι (noun pl masc nom ) "The winds" is from anemos, which means "wind", "a cardinal point," or "quarter." It means both the physical wind and the direction from which the wind comes.

καὶ" (and) And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

προσέπεσαν (3rd pl aor ind act) "Beat upon" is from prospipto, which means to "sit by", "sit near," and means literally "fall towards" and "fell against".

τῇ οἰκίᾳ (noun sg fem dat) "House" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household."

ἐκείνῃ, (adj sg fem dat) "That" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐκ (patic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative particle for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative particle, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔπεσεν, (3rd sg aor ind act) "It fell" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geomerty)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)." -- The word translated as "fell" primarily means "to fall" but like our English word, has a large number of special uses.

τεθεμελίωτο (3rd sg plup ind mp) "It was founded" is from themelioo, which means "to lay the foundation of", "to found firmly," and, in the passive, "to have the foundations laid," and "to destroy utterly."

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Upon" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

τὴν πέτραν. (noun sg fem acc) "A rock" is from petra, which means "rock", "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" of "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."

Apr 17 2017

evidence: 

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