Vocabulary Notes

Note: The vocabulary listed below contains a short definitions condense from Tufts University's Perseus Project. Dictionary links here are to the BlueLetter Bible site, which uses only the Biblical use not the general Greek meaning.

"Abraham" is from Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

"Brother" is from adelphos, which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother." -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

"The unjust' is from adikos, which means "wrongdoing", "unrighteous," unjust", "obstinate", "unmanageable", "unjust", "unrighteous [of things]," and "one who play unfairly."

"Shall be impossible" is from adynateo, , which means "to be unable to do", "lack strength," and of things, "to be impossible." -- The word translated as "will be impossible" is the negative form of the verb commonly translated as "can," which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

"Be exceedingly glad" is from agalliao means "rejoice exceedingly" and is a later from of agallomai, which means to "glorify," and "exalt," especially the idea of "paying honor" to God.

"Hast loved" is from agapao, which means "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", "to caress", "to prize", "to desire", "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with." -- The word translated as "love" expresse s a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", and "to be contented with." See this article on love for more information.

"The love" is from agape, which means "the love of a husband and wife", "love of God by man", "brotherly love", "charity," and "alms." -- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "love of spouses" "love of God" and "charity" in the sense of giving to the poor. In the KJV of the Gospels, it is always translated as "love" or "beloved." Christ associates this word with affection rather than passion. In Greek, it is associated with the affection of hugging and embracing someone. See this article on love for more information.

"Good" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." -- The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

"Angels" is from aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use. -- "Angels" is from a noun meaning "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use from its use in the NT.

"New" is from agnaphos, which means "uncarded", "unmilled", "unfulled", "undressed," and "unprocessed." -- The word translated as "new" means "unfinished" or "unprocessed."

"Field" is from ἀγρὸν agros (agros), which means "field", "lands," or "country."

"Bring" is from ago, which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight." -- "Shall be brought" is a Greek word which means "to lead", "to carry," or "to fetch" and has a lot of different specific meanings in different contexts. Not all of these are negative, for example, this phrase could mean "guided." It is in the passives, future, so "you a going to be guided."

"Age" is from aion, which means "life", "lifetime", "age," or "generation."

"Everlasting" is from aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." -- "Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

"Be removed" is from airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is from apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." -- "Shall be taken" is from one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."Christ uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross.

"Asked" is from aiteo, which means "to ask", "to demand", "to beg", "to claim," and "to ask for one's own use." -- The verb "ask" has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim."

"Thorns" is from akantha, which means "thorn", "prickle," or "any thorny or prickly plant." It is also a metaphor for a "thorny" question. -- The Greek words translated as "thorns" and "thistles" both mean any type of thorny plant. Two different words are used because this is a reference to Gen 3:18, where two different Hebrew words are used. This means that two different Greek words are used in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The same exact ones used here. In Jewish tradition, thorns did not exist in the original creation, but were created after humanity's fall.

"Harmless" is from akeraios, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible." -- "Harmless" is translated from a Greek word, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptibleakeraios, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible." -- "Harmless" is translated from a Greek word, which doesn't mean harmless at all. It means "pure", "unravaged," and "incorruptible

"Follow" is from akoloutheo, which means "to follow," and "to go with." It also means "to be guided by" and means following a leader as a disciple. -- The term "follow" means "to follow," or "go with," in a physical sense, but it is also a metaphor meaning "to be guided by" or "to follow the meaning of."

"Shall hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

"But" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is from the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

"Truth" is from aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances.

"The other" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," {with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

"Foxes" is from alopex, which means "fox", "Canis vulpes", "a large bat", "muscles of the loins", "mange," and "a type of dance." -- The word for "fox" is, in Greek as English, the metaphor for a sly, crafty man.

"Verily" is from amen, which is from the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut." -- The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

"Both" is from amphoteroi, which means "either", "both of two", "both together", "towards both sides", "both ways", "on both sides," and "all together." -- The word translated as "both" means "both sides" and "both ways" as well as "both together." It is chosen because unlike the common word for "both," it implies two different ways or sides together.

"Vineyard" is from ampelon which means simply "vineyard."

"Should be" is from an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

"He maketh...to rise" is from anatellô, which means "to rise", "to make rise up", "to give birth", "to gush forth [water]", "to bring forth", "to spring up [plants]", "rise [mountains]," and "to appear above the horizon [sun,moon]."

"East" is from anatole, which means "rising above the horizon (of any heavenly body)", "the quarter of sunrise", "east", "the ascendant (i.e. the point where the eastern horizon cuts the zodiac)", "a phase of new moon," "sources of a river (in pl.), and "growing ( of the teeth)." -- The word translated as "east" primarily refers to the rising of heavenly bodies above the horizon. It comes to mean "east" because that is the direction in which heavenly bodies arise. However, it also refers to the sources of a river when it is in the plural as it is here.

More tolerable" is anektoteros (the comparative "more" form of anektos), which "bearable", "sufferable", "that which can be endured," or "tolerable." -- "More tolerable" is the comparative form ("more") of an adjective which "bearable" or "sufferable."

"Open" is from anoigo, which means "to open", "to throw open," and "to disclose." -- The term for "open" is means "to disclose" or "to lay open."

(noun sg fem) "Inequity" is from anomia, which means "lawless", "lawless conduct," and "the negation of law." -- "Inequity" is translated from a Greek word meaning "lawlessness." It means violating customs and common standards of civility, so "immorality" and "criminality."

"Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, as it is here, it means "people" and "peoples".

"Adversary" is from antidikos, which means "opponent or adversary in a suit", "the defendant [primarily]," "the plaintiff," and, generally, "opponent," and "adversary."

"Ye resist" is from anthihestimi, which "to set against", "to match with", "to compare", "to stand against", "to withstand", "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand."

"They have"" is from apecho, which means "to keep off or away from", "to hold one's hands off or away from", "to hold oneself off a thing", "to abstain or desist from it," "to project", "to extend", "to be far from," and "to receive payment in full." -- The Greek word translated as "They have" is not the Greek word meaning "to have." It primarily means "to keep off or away from." Christ uses it because it has the special meaning in business of "to receive payment in full." This is the sense that it is used here.

"Go away" is from aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

"They disfigure" is from aphanizo, which means "to make unseen", "to hide", "to vanish" "to hush up", "to do away with", "to reject, "to remove", "to destroy", "to obliterate [writing], "to spirit away [a witness]", "to secrete", "to steal", "to obscure", "to mar", "to disguise [by dyeing]", "to spoil", "to make away with", "to drain [a cup of wine]," or "deprive of luster." -- The Greek verb translated as "to disfigure" encompasses many different forms of hiding or concealing something.

"I leave" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -- The word translated as "forgive" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

"From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

"Shall...be revealed" is apokalupto, which means to "uncover", "disclose", "reveal," unmask", ""make bare."become known," (middle passive) "reveal one's whole mind," (passive) "be made known," and as an adjective, "naked," and "shameless." It is the opposite of kaluptô, "to cover" and "to hide."-- "Shall...be revealed" is a compound form of the word meaning "to cover" and "to hide "with an "away from" which reverses its meaning, so it means to uncover or reveal and, in the passive, "to become known. "

"Barns" is from apotheke, which means "any place wherein to lay up a thing", "magazine", "storehouse", "burial-place", "refuge", "anything laid by", "store," and "store of favor."

"To kill" is from apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying"). -- "To kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

"Deliver" is from apodidomi which means "to give back", "to restore," and "to deliver." It has the economic sense of "to sell" or "to give something for one's own profit." It begins with apo the preposition of separation and origin, the idea of "from" in English, didômi which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," and "to describe." -- The word translated as "reward" doesn't mean "reward." It means "to give back." In a financial sense, to "pay back." Prayer, like charity in the earlier verse, is treated as though it is an activity or for of work for which we are compensated. Hence, the idea of "paying back."

"Should perish" is from apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone." -- The word translated as "perish" means to destroy or demolish.

"Shall put away" might be from apolyo which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

"A writing of divorcement" is from apostasion, which is most likely the future participle of the verb, aphesteco, which means "to be absent" or "to be away from."

"Thou hast sent" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch." -- The "send forth" here is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

"From...turn...thou away." is from apostrepho, which means "to turn back", "to turn aside", "to dissuade from", "to bring back," and "to recall."

"Wherefore" is from ara, which means "there and then", "straightway", "then", "next", "mark you!", "for this cause", "so true is it that," and "namely." -- The word translated as "wherefore" is a particle marking a sudden change or explaining or drawing attention to a consequence of an action.

"By them of old time" is from archaios, which means as an adjective means "from the beginning", "from the source", "ancient", "simple", "silly", "former", "the Ancients [of people]", "anciently [adverb], and "the principle [in a loan],"

"Silver" is from arguros, which means "any white metal", "silver", "silver plate", "quicksilver," "silver-money," and, generally, "money." -- "Silver" is from word that means any white metal or anything plated with white metal. It is also used to refer generally to money.

"Numbered" is arithmeo, which means "to count," and "to number," but for the tax collector it also means "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." -- "Numbered" is from the Greek source of our word "arithmetic," which means "to count", "to number", "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." It is in a form which indicates that they, as the subject, are acting on themselves, so "have accounted for themselves" or "have paid for themselves."

"Now" is from arti, which means "just", "exactly," and "just now." -- The Greek word translated as "now" means "just" or "exactly and "now" in the sense of "just now" when applied to time. Christ usually seems to use it in the sense of "now".

"Bread" is from artos, which means specifically a "cake of whole wheat bread," and generally "loaf," and "bread." -- The word translated as "bread" means "small loaf or cake of bread". It is more like a slice of bread today.

"Bottles" is from askos, which means "skin", "hide", "skin made into a bag", "wineskin", "belly", "paunch," and "human skin." -- The term translated as "bottles" means "skins, and describes the leather containers, wine skins, used for wine used in Christ's time. The problem with updating the terms to bottles is that the analogy not longer works. The word also means "human skin" and is a clear metaphor for the container of philosophy: human beings.

"Ye salute" is aspazomai, which means "to welcome kindly", "to greet", "to be glad", "to kiss", "to embrace", "to cling fondly to", "to draw to one's self", "to follow eagerly [of things]", "to cleave to [of things], "to receive with joy," and "to salute [from a distance]." -- The word translated as "salute" is is translated as "greet" in most other Bible translated, but the idea is more enthusiastic that that. The word means "draw to yourself." It is used mostly to describe greeting, including the embracing and kissing of a greeting, but it also describe clinging to, and saying goodbye, where there can be embraces as well. It is in the form of either a statement or a command/request.

"Farthing" is from assarion, which was one-tenth of a drachma, which was the standard silver coin of Greece. This was a medium sized coin, like our nickel or dime. -- "For a farthing" is from the name of a coin of medium value, one that was worth one-tenth of the standard coin (drachma) used in the Greek world but four times more than the smallest coin. It is in the possessive case, which is the source of the "for."

"Reject" is from atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to :break faith with."

(adj sg masc gen) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

"They grow" is from auxano, which means to "increase", "increase in power", "strengthen", "exalt by one's deeds", "glorify", "exalt by one's deeds", "glorify", "amplify", "exaggerate", "bring up," and "sacrifice."

"Worth" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved." -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the sames as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. We saw it for the first time in the last post.

"Cast" is from ballo, which means "to throw", "to let fall," "to cast," "to put", "to pour", "to place money on deposit", "push forward or in front [of animals]", "to shed", "to place", "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky", "to fall", "to lay as foundation", "to begin to form", "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe." -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Christ often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. In dice, it means "to throw" the dice, but with the sense of being lucky.

"The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

"King" is from basileus, which means a "king", "chief", "prince", "lord", "master", "a great man," and "the first and most distinguished of any class." It is a form of the word used for "kingdom." -- "King" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

"Use vain repetitions" is from battalogeo, which means "to speak stammeringly", "to say the same thing over and over again," and "to prattle." -- The Greek word that gets translated as "use vain repetitions" means "to stammer" or "to repeat the same words over and over." is an inherently humorous word about words. It ends with "logeo," a form of logos, which is usually translated in the KJV as "word It is made from the name of either a famous stammer, Battos, the king of Cyrene, or a wordy and boring poet, Battus. It means "saying the same thing over and over."

"Seeth" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." -- The verb translated as "see ye" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

"Sends rain" is from brecho, which means "to wet", "to moisten", "to shower [with wealth]", "to bath [in sweat]", "to get drunk", "to rain", "to send rain," and "to be filled with water."

"Meat" is from brosis, which means "meat", "pasture", "eating, "taste," and "flavor." Only in this and related passages of the NT is it translated as "corrosion", "rust, or "decay."

"I am glad" is from chairô (chairo) which means "rejoice", "take pleasure in," and "welcome."

"Brass" is from chalkos, which means "copper", "bronze", "anything made of metal (esp. of arms)", "vessels of copper", "cauldron", "urn", "copper money", "bronze plate" and "tablet." -- "Brass" is from a word that means either copper or bronze, or generally, anything made of metal, specifically weapons.

"Coat" is from chiton, which means "the garment worn next to the skin", "tunic [a men's]", "a coating", "a covering", "a membrane [anatomical]", "the upper part of a show", "vesture," and "coat of mail." -- "Coats" is from the Greek word means an undergarment, not an over garment. Christ is literally saying, "Don't take two pairs of underwear." There is a certain humor in this that seems intentional.

"Hand" is from cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

"Worse" is from cheiron, which means (of persons) "meaner", "inferior," (in moral sense) "worse than others", "worse (in quality)", "inferior," and, as a noun, "inferiority." -- The terms translated as "worse" means various forms of inferiority and degradation.

"Christ" is from christos, which means "to be rubber with salve", "used as an ointment," and, of persons, "anointed." --- The word translated as "Christ" means "annointed." In the NT, it is understood to mean the Messiah, following the anointing of the kings of Israel. The Jews of Jesus's era thought they understood who the Messiah was and the source of his authority. He was a decendant of David, and his authority came from David as "the annointed" king of the Jews.

"Need of" is from chreia (chreia ), which means "need", "want", "poverty", "a request of a necessity", "business", "military service", "a business affair", "employment", "familiarity", "intimacy," and "maxim." -- The word translated as "need" means "need" and "poverty," but it also means "familiarity" and "intimacy."

"Filled" is from chortazô (chortazo), which means "feed", "feast", "fatten" and "to eat their fill." It is a term most commonly used for cattle.

"Need" is from chreia , which means "need", "want", "poverty", "a request of a necessity", "business", "military service", "a business affair", "employment", "familiarity", "intimacy," and "maxim."

"While" is from chronos, which means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age", "season", "delay," and "tense."

"Gold" is chrusos, which means "gold", "things made of gold (including stamped coins)." and "anything dear or precious." -- "Gold" is from a word that means things made of gold and, poetically, anything precious to a person, including stamped coins.

"Borrow" is from daneizo, which means "to put out to usury", "to let out", "to borrow," and "to have lent out to one."

(conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

"They may receive" is from dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. -- "Receive" is from a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality.

"Tree" is from dendron (more commonly spelled dendreon), which means "tree", "fruit-tree", "tall plants (such as rattan)" "stick," and "timber." -- The word for "tree" most commonly means fruit bearing trees. The tree was a symbol for the naturally productive assets of nature as opposed to fields which must be planted each year.

"Right" is from dexios, which means, as an adjective, "on the right hand", "fortunate", "skillful", "ready", "clever", "courteous," and "kindly." As a noun, it means the "right hand," "assurance", "pledge", "treaty,"

"Through" is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." -- The word translated as "through" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)."

"The devil" is from diabolos, which means "slanderous", "backbiting," and "slanderer." -- The term translated as "the devil" is another adjective, that means "to slander." Introduced by an article ("the") it becomes an noun and means "the slanderer" and "the backbiter" in Greek. Christ uses it to describe someone who degrade other people primarily by lying about them.

) "The righteous" is from dikaios which means "observant of rules", "observant of customs", "well-ordered", "civilized," and "observant of duty." Later it means "well-balanced", "impartial," and "just." As a verb, it means to "set right", "hold or deem right", "claim or demand as a right", "pronounce judgment", "do a man right or justice", "chastise", "punish, and in passive, "have right done one." -- The final word here can either be the noun means "the virtuous" or a form of the verb means "to do right." When introduced by an article the verb becomes the concept of doing right, "these virtues." This idea also refers back to the previous verse where Christ said his accusers "appear" righteous.

"Righteousness" is from dikaiosyne, which means "righteousness", "justice", "fulfillment of the law," and "the business of a judge." It carries the sense of virtue but specifically that of fulfilling legal or social requirements. -- The word translated as "righteousness" also means "justice" and generally "fulfillment of the law". When applied to God, it works best as "justice," but when applied to people "virtue" works better since we don't use "righteousness" must any more.

"Will give" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." -- The verb translated as "given" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

"Break through" is from diorysso, which means "digging through, "having dug a trench across or along," metaph "undermine", "ruin", "worm out," and Pass., "to be shut up in a funeral vault."

"Thirst" is from dipsao, which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," "to be parched", "to be in want of", "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing.

"Must" is from, dei, which means "needful," and "there is need."

"Fearful" is from deilos, which means "cowardly" "vile," "worthless," "lowborn", "mean", "miserable," and "wretched." -- The word translated as "fearful" means "cowardly" but has a lot of meanings, both critical and sympathetic, relating to being "lowborn" and "wretched."

"Bind" is deo which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " -- "Bind" is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " It is a past participle in a form that indicates something acting on itself so "has been tied itself." The sense is not that the ass was tied up by someone, but rather that it has tangled itself up in something.

"Are...better than" is from diaphero, which means to "carry over or across", "carry from one to another", "go through life [of Time]", "bear through", "bear to the end", "go through with", "carry different ways", "spread...fame abroad", "tear asunder", "defer or reserve for judgment", "differ", "make the difference", "to be of importance", "have an interest at stake," "prevail", "quarrel", "struggle", "come between", "intervene," and, Pass. "be at variance and maintain on the contrary." quarrel." When uses as a noun, "that which makes a difference", "the difference," and "the odds.

Servants" is from the noun diakonos, which means "servant", "messenger," and "attendant." This is the source for our word "deacon." As a verb, it is from diakoneô, which "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." -- The word translated here as "servants," actually means "servant." It is not the Greek word usually translated as "servant," which really means "slave."

"Master" is from didaskalos, which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer." -- "Master" is translated from a Greek word that means "teacher," and "trainer." It is usually translated as "Master" in the Gospels, but the main sense is always "teacher." The Greek word often translated as "Lord" means "Master" in the sense of one in charge of others.

"Persecuted" is from diôkô (dioko), which means "to cause to run", "to set into motion", "to pursue", "to chase [away]," to follow", "to seek after," "to be hurried (passive)," "to urge on", "to prosecute [legally]", " or "to drive." -- The word translated as "persecute" means both "chase away" and "seek after." It is in the form that indicates something that might happen.

"Teach" is from didasko, which means "to teach", "to instruct", "to indicate", "to explain," and "to give sign of."

"They think" is from dokeo, which means "expect", "suppose", "imagine", "have an opinion", "seem", "seem good," and "to be reputed." -- The word translated as "think" doesn't mean think as much as it means "expect" or "imagine."

"Beam" is from dokos, which means "bearing-beam", "main beam", "plank", "support", "beam", "strut", "brace", "firewood", "bar [of a gate or door]," and "a kind of meteor." -- The term translated as "beam" means the main bearing beam in a house that holds up the roof or floor but also covers any stick of wood. It is perhaps meaningful that it is the term for the bar on a door.

"Gifts" is from doma, which means "gift" and "payment." -- The word for "gifts" also means "payments." -- The word for "gifts" also means "payments."

"Housetops" is doma, which means a "a house", "a hall", "housetop", "chief room", "household," or "a family." -- "Housetops" is translated from a Greek word that is the source of our word domicile. It has most of the same meanings as the word Christ usually uses for "house," but it also means the chief room of a house and the housetop.

Thirst" is from dipsao, which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," "to be parched", "to be in want of", "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing.

"Gift" is from dôron (doron) which means "gift", "present," and specifically a "votive gift" or "offering" to a god. The simpler term without the sense of a votive offering is "dorea."

"The servant" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave." -- The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

"Glory" is from doxa, which means "expectation", "notion", "opinion", "repute," and "popular repute." Translations as "glory" or "splendor" are applied to external appearances but are found primarily in translating the Bible. The words "recognition" and "reputation" come closest to capturing the way Christ uses the word, especially if we consider how he uses the verb form.

"Honour" is from doxazo, which primarily means "to think", "to expect", "to imagine," or "to suppose." Secondarily, it means "to magnify" or "to extol," which is where we get the "glorify" used most often in NT the translation. The English term "to recognize" carries the same sense of both seeing a person in the mind and honoring them. -- The Greek term translated as "to have glory" is a word that primarily means "to imagine" and "to expect." It also means "to honor" in a sense. However, the word that it comes closest to in English is "to recognize" since that word captures both the mental imaging and honoring sense of the word. "Recognize" works especially well with actors because they seek fame and recognition from the audience.

"Two" is from duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

"Can" is from the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough." - The word translated as "I can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

"Power" is from dynamis (dunamis), which means "power", "might", "influence", "authority", "capacity", "elementary force", "force of a word," and "value of money." Elemental forces are forces such as heat and cold. -- "Mighty works" is from a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It does not carry the sense of authority over others, either people or laws. The verb form of this word is translated as "can" in the NT.

"West" is from dysme, which means "setting (mostly in pl.)", "the quarter of sunset," and "west." -- The word translated as "west" is means "setting," as the opposite of "rising."

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

"If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

"But" is from ean me, which means "if not." "If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. "Not" is from (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no."

"Have" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." -- The word translated as "have" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is.

"Enemy" is from echthros, which means "the hated", "the hateful", "the hostile", "the enemy", "the alienated," and "the hating."

"Yet" is from ede, which means "already", "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

"Arise" is from egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse." -- The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising.

"If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions. -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether than condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

"Shall see" is from eidon which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." -- The verb translated as "knoweth" means "to see" but it is used, like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive."

"Is at hand" is from eggizo, which means "to bring near", "to join one things to another," to draw near," and "to approach." This word does not appear in the Perseus dictionary. It comes from an adverb ἐγγύς, keggus, which means 1) (of place) "near", "nigh", "at hand," 2) (of time) "nigh at hand" 3) (of numbers) "nearly", "almost", "coming near," and 4) (of relationship) "akin to." -- The word translated as "is at hand" is another word that appears for the first time in the NT. It is the verb form of an adverb "near" in space, time, and relationships. In English, we would say "nears" or, in the form here, "has neared," doesn't quite work so perhaps "has gotten close" or, in the case of time, "is nearly here."

"I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

"Except" is from ei me, which is the conjunction that means "if not", "but," and "except." εἰ is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether." (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no."

(verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." -- The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

"Mercy" is from the verb eleeo, which means "to have pity on," "to show pity to," and "to feel pity." In the passive, "to be shown pity," and "to be pitied."

"Merciful" is from eleemon, which is a noun meaning the "pitiful" and "merciful."

"Thine alms" is from eleemosyne, which means "pity", "mercy", "charity," and "alms." It is the noun for of the verb eleeo, which means "to have pity on," "to show mercy to," and "to feel pity." In the passive, "to be shown pity," and "to be pitied." -- The Greek word translated as "charity" is the Greek source for our word "alms." However, primarily means "pity" or "mercy." It is another form of the word used in the Beatitudes as "merciful" and "obtain mercy."

"Behold" is from emblepo, which means "look in the face", "look at,"" look into", "consider," and "look."

"In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"Raiment" is from endyma, which means "garment," and "covering." -- The word translated as "raiment" means "clothing" or "covering."

"Put on" is from endyo, which means to "go into", "put on [clothes]", "enter", "press into", "sink in", "enter upon it", "undertake it," and "insinuate oneself into." -- The word translated as "ye shall put on" one means that when the context is clothes. This is not obviously the case here. It more generally means "get into," which seems to be what Christ is saying.

"In danger" is from enochos, which means "held in by", "bound by", "liable to", "subject to", "guilty," and "liable to a penalty for."

"Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

"They shall be heard" is from eisakouo, which means "to hearken, "to give ear to one", "to give way", "to yield to a request", "to perceive", "to feel effect of," and "to hear." -- The word translated as "they shall be heard" is a little more complicated than the translation. It is another compound word meaning "to hear in regard to." In the passive, it means to be heard in regard to something. It means that someone has been listened to and their advice followed or it means that someone has granted a request made of them.

"Enter" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind." -- "Ye shall enter" is from a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

"One" is from heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

"From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." -- The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

"Cast out" is from ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter." -- "Cast out" is from a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

"Runneth out" is from ekcheo, which means to "pour out", "pour away", " spill", "squander", "waste", "spread out", "throw down," and, as a metaphor, "to be cast away", "forgotten", "give oneself up to any emotion," and "to be overjoyed." -- The Greek word translated as "runneth out" means "to pour out," and "spill," but it is a metaphor for "to be forgotten" and to be "overcome with emotion."

"Cut it off" is from ekkopto, which means "to cut out", "to knock off", "to beat off [in battle]", "to hinder", "to break open", "to win [in throwing dice]", "to erase [an inscription]," "to come to a stop", "to stamp a coin", "to pause," or "to cut off." It is also a metaphor for "to make an end of." -- The word translated as "is hewn down" means various forms of being "cut off," an idea that has a range of meanings similar to those in English from being hindered to being chopped down or ended. What makes it interesting is, though it is translated as something that happens to the tree in English (the passive voice), in Greek it is the "middle voice" indicating something that the tree does to itself. In dice, it means "to win."

"I have chosen" is from eklegomai, which means "to pick out" "to single out," and "to choose for oneself."

"Shake off" is from ektinasso, which means "to shake out (in cleaning)", "to expel", "to shake off", "to make a disturbance," "to search thoroughly", "to kick out (of animals)," and in the passive "is thrown out." -- The word translated as "shake of" means "to shake out" while cleaning.

"Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

"Me" is from emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb. -- "Me" is from the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

"My" is from emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me." -- "My" is from the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

"Me" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine". -- "Me" is from the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

"In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" that means "within", "with," or "among."

"Commandments" is from entole which means "injunction", "order," and "command." -- The word translated as "commandments" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society.

"Hence" is from enteuthen, which means "from that place" and "hence." -- "Hence" is from a word that means "from that place" and "hence." In English, in this context, we would say "from here."

"Shall rise up" is from epanistemi, which means to "set up again", "make to rise against", "raise in revolt", "stand up after", "rise from "bed," rise, rise up against", "rise in insurrection against", "to be raised or built (of buildings)," and " rise above. -- "Rise up" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "set up again", "to make to rise against," and "to revolt." It is in the form which indicates that the subject is acting on itself.

"Against" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." -- The word translated as "unto" means "against", "before", "by" or "on."

"Putteth" is from epiballo, which means to "throw or cast upon", "lay on", " affix (a seal, add),"" contribute", "place next in order", "let grow", "let loose", "throw oneself upon", "go straight towards", "follow", "come next", "belong to", "fall to the share of", "shut to", "close", "to overlap (in logic)," and in the passive to "lie upon", "be put upon," and "be set over." -- The word translated as "putteth" means literally to" throw against, before, by or on," but it has a large variety of specific uses. It implication is that the patching is not well done, but just thrown on.

"A piece" is from epiblema, which means "that which is thrown over", "covering", "tapestry", "hangings", "that which is put on", "piece of embroidery," and "outer bandage." -- The word translated as "piece" uses the same base as the word above and means "something thrown over" or "tossed on." However, here, it makes the most sense as a bandage.

"Will he give" is from epididōmi which means to "give besides", "give afterwards", "contribute as a `benevolence'", "give freely", "bestow", "give oneself up", "devote oneself", "give into another's hands", "deliver", "take as one's witness", "increase", "advance", "improve", "give in," and "give way." -- The word translated as "will he give" is not from the normal verb translated as "give" , but a more complicated word meaning "give besides" or "bestow."

"Return" is from epistrepho, which means "to turn about", "to turn around", "turn towards", "return", "curve", "twist", "go back-and forwards", "pay attention to," "to turn one's mind towards," "regard", "conduct oneself," and "behave," and in the passive to "be converted", "to be distorted", "turn oneself round", "are turned," and as an adjective, "earnest", "vehement." -- "Return" is translated from a Greek word "to turn about" or "to turn around," but also means "cause to return" and "to turn one's mind towards" something. In the passive, which is used here, it means "to turn oneself around" or "be turned around."

"I have called" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." -- "Speak you" is from means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

"Yonder place" is from ekei, which means "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world." -- "Yonder place" is a word meaning "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world."

"He" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." -- The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

"Mercy" is from eleos, which means "pity", "mercy," and "compassion." -- The Greek term translated as "mercy" means "good will toward the afflicted." It also means "pity" and "compassion." In the original Hebrew, "mercy" is checed, which means "goodness", "kindness," and "faithfulness." It also means "to be ashamed" and "a reproach." Based on the verb checed ("to be kind"), the adjective combines both the idea of being good and feel guilty if you are not good.

"Myself" is from emautou, which means "of me," and "of myself". -- The Greek reflexive pronoun is translated as myself.

"Before" is from emprosthen, which as an adverb means [of place]"in front of", "before", "forwards," [of time] "before", "of old," and as a preposition, "facing", "opposite", "in front," [of time] beforehand," and [of degree] "preferred before." It also denotes a ranking. -- The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

"Hath lifted up" is from epairo, which means "lift up", "set on", "raise", "stir up", "excite", "urge on," and "persuade."

"Ye shall know" is from epiginosko, which means "look upon", "witness", "observe", "recognize", "find out," "discover", "learn to know", "take notice of", "come to a judgment", "decide", "acknowledge," and "approve." -- The word means literally, "on learning to know" or "by learning to know." Generally, it means "to witness" or "to discover."

"Thou shalt...forswear thyself," is from epiorkeo, (2nd sg aor subj act) which means "to swear falsely," and "to forswear oneself."

"To lust after" is from epithymeo, which means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for."

"It hath been said," is from ero, which means "to speak", "to say", "to pronounce", "to tell", "to let suffice", "to announce", "to proclaim," (in passive) "to be pronounced", "to be mentioned", "to be specified", "to be agreed," and "to be promised."

"Come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being under way."

"Workman" is from ergates, which means "workman", "one who works the soil", "husbandman", "hard-working", "strenuous", "one who practices an art", "practitioner", "doer," and "producer."

(verb 3rd sg aor ind mp) "Traded" is from ergazomai, which means to "work at", "make", "do", "perform", "work [a material]", "earn by working," work at a trade or business", " traffic," and "trade." - Christ uses a very businesslike term that means "to labor", "to trade", "to do business", "to earn by working," and "to acquire." -- "Traded" is from a word Christ uses humorously. It means "work", "do," or "make," but it is not the common word Christ uses frequently, but a more sophisticated word he uses less commonly. He uses it to mean "make a living for yourself." The form is where the subject acts on himself, so "work yourself."

"The works" is from ergon, which means "works", "tasks", "deeds", "actions", "thing," and "matter." -- The Greek word translated as "works" means "deeds", "actions," and "things" in the sense of "every thing."

"Peace" is eirene, which means "time of peace," "national tranquility," "peace", "tranquility,""personal tranquility," and "harmony." It is the name for the goddess of peace. -- "Peace" is the Greek term that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health.

"Peacemaker" is from eirenopoios, which means literally, "one who produces peace" or "one who makes peaceful." The first part of the word comes from eirene, a noun which means both the freedom from fear and a treaty of peace between countries. The last part of the word is the verb, poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

"The last" is from eschatos. In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending."

"Ye shall eat" is from esthiô (esthio), which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion. -- The word translated as "ye shall eat" meanz "eat" but it also means "fret," a we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier.

(adv) "Within" is from esothen, which means "from within" and "inward." -- "Within" is from the adverb meaning "inwardly."

"Gentiles" is from ethnikos, which means "national", "provincial", "foriegn," and "gentile." It was used in the same way we would describe someone as an "ethnic" or "foreigner." Foreigners, the Greeks and Romans, were the rulers of the nation in Christ's time. -- The word translated as "the heathen" generally refers to everyone who is not a Jew.

"The gentiles" is from ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations." -- The word translated as "Gentiles" does not mean gentiles or even foreigners. Its primary meaning is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. It is in the same form as the "them" above, so "to them" or "for them."

"Yet" is from eti, which means "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree).

"Agree" is from eunoeō, (with eimi above) which means "to be well-inclined", "to be favorable", "to be kindly", "to be friendly", "to be liked," and "to be affectionately treated." This form is both the present participle and the adjective.

"Pluck...out" is from exaireo, which means "to take out", "to take out for oneself", "to remove from stock", "to choose for oneself", "to chose", "to carry off booty", "to have accepted", "to be set apart [for funds]", "to remove [people]", "to destroy", "to annul," and "to set free." It literally means "to choose from."

"Proceeded forth" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true." -- The word translated as "ye go thence" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true."

"Enquire" is from exetazo, which means to "search out", "examine well or closely", "scrutinize", "review", "pass in review", "enumerate", "prove by scrutiny or test." -- "Enquire" is from a word that has the sense of a more serious investigation than simply asking someone in passing. Christ only uses this word once, here.

"Out" is from exo, which means "out of a place", "outside", "external things," and "beyond a time." -- The word translated as "out" means "out of a place" and "outside."

(adv) "Outwardly"is from exothen, which "from without" and "outward." -- The word used for "outwardly" is the adverb meaning "outwardly" and "from without."

"Power" is from exousia which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power." -- The term translated as "power" isn't the "power" of skill or energy but of authority, control, and the ability to choose.

"The marriage" is from the from gamos, which means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock."

(partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation. To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

"Earth" is from ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. -- The word translated as "earth" means the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this articlefor more on these words.

"Hell" is geenna which is Greek for Gehenna, the valley of Hinnom (the Hebrew word), south of Jerusalem where trash, including diseased animals and human corpses was burned. A constant fire was kept burning there. -- The word "hell" as the name of an area where a constant fire was kept for disposing of trash from the city. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, and Baal (Beelzebub, "lord of the flies"), Christ's personification of evil.

(noun pl fem acc/gen) "Generation" is from genea, which means "race", "family", "generation", "class," and "kind." It is a form of the word from which we get the scientific word,"genus." -- The word translated as "generation" means "race", "family", and "generation". Christ uses this term frequently in criticism, but that criticism seems more aim at the human race, or, more narrowly, his own people, that it is his generation. It is the word from which we get the scientific "genus".

"Is" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. -- The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

"You know," is from ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." -- "Be known" is from a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

"The corners" is from gonia, which means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

"Parents" is goneus, which mean "progenitor" and can refer to parents or ancestors. -- "Parents" is a word that means "progenitor" and can refer to parents or ancestors.

"Scribes" is from grammateus, which is generally a "secretary," "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar," but specifically means someone who uses gramma which is Greek for "drawings", "a letter," (as in an alphabet)"diagrams," and "letters" (as in correspondence). -- "Scribes" is translated from a Greek word describing anyone who used written records in their job, "secretary", "registrar,' and "scholar." However, Christ used it to name those scholars who specifically studied the Bible and wrote about its meanings. A modern equivalent would be "academics."

"The scripture" is from graphe, which means "representing by means of lines", "a drawing", "writing", "the art of writing," and "that which is written." It came to mean "scripture" from its use in the Gospels.

"It is written" is from grapho which means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", "to proscribe", "to ordain", "to write for oneself", "to enroll oneself", "to draw signs", "to describe a figure" "to brand," and "to indict."

"Woman" is from gyne, which means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)."

"Holy" is from hagios, which means "devoted to the gods", "pure", "holy," and on the negative side "accursed."

"Hallowed be"" is from is hagiazo, which means "to separate from profane things and dedicate to God", "to dedicate people to God", "to purify," and "to cleanse externally or internally." This may be a special form of hagizo which means "to hallow", "to dedicate," and "to make sacred," commonly by burning a sacrifice. It may also be a verb from of the noun hagos, which means "a thing that creates awe." --

It is perhaps, an unusual form of another Greek verb meaning "to dedicate to God" and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In may also be a verb form of a Greek noun, meaning "a thing that creates awe." In a good sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God.

"Salt" is from halas which means "salt", "salt-rock", "brine," and is a metaphor for "sales" and "wit."

(noun sg neut nom) "The blood" is haima (haima), which means "blood," "streams of blood", "anything like blood," "spirit", "courage", "bloodshed", "murder", "blood relationship,"kin," and "kindship." -- "Blood" is from the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

"Sin" is from hamartia, which means "to miss the mark", "failure", "fault," and "error." Only in religious uses does it become "guilt" and "sin." -- The word translated as "sin" is a form of a word that means "to fail in one's purpose", "to neglect," and "to be deprived of." It has no sense of doing malicious evil in Greek. The best English translation is "mistakes" or "failures" rather than what we commonly think of as the evils of "sin." See this article for more information and context.

"Sinners" is from hamartolos, which means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. -- "Sinners" is from word that means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. Only in biblical translations is this term given the sense of wickedness. More about the translation issues regarding "sin" here.

"Himself" is from heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

(3rd sg aor subj act or 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Shall come" is from heko, which means "to arrive", "to have come", "to be present", "to have reached a point, "to pass though a point (geometry)", "to have come back", "returned", "to have come to table", "concern", "relate to", "to depend upon," and, as a metaphor, "to be a follower." -- The word translated as "shall come" is a complicate one because it indicates a "coming" that has been completed, that is, "to arrive" or, even, "to be present." As a metaphor, it means "to be a follower."

"Governors" is from hegemon, which means "one who leads", "leader", "commander", "chief," and "one who does a thing first." The term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times. -- "Governors" is from the Greek for a leader of any kind, but the term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times.

"One" is from heis, which means "one", "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen. The form is mia, feminine singular.

"Sun" is from helios, which means the "sun", "life", "day", "sunshine", "the sun's heat", "brightness," and the sun-god.

"Draw" is from helko, which means "to draw", "to drag", "to draw after one", "to tear to pieces", "to worry," [metaphorically] "to carp at", "to draw [a sword or box]", "to tow [a ship]", "to drag [into court]", "to suck up", "to drag out", "to draw to oneself", "to attract", "to draw [from a source]", "to tear out [one's hair]", "to be wretched", "to scrape up", "to amass," and "to be drawn [at a pace]."

"We are" is from hemeis, the first person plural pronoun, "we", "us".

"Day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." -- The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

"Our" is from hemon, which is the plural possessive (genitive) form of the first personal pronoun.

"For" is from heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." -- The word translated as "sake" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

"While" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that." -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

"Another" is from heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly." -- The word translated as "another" means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun.

"Findeth" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain." -- The term used for "find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

"Garment" is from himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth." -- The word translated as "garment" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status.

"That" is from hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because." -- The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

"Stand" is from histemi, which means "to make to stand", "to stand", "to set up", "to bring to a standstill", "to check", "to appoint", "to establish", "to fix by agreement", "to be placed", "to be set", "to stand still", "to stand firm", "to set upright", "to erected", "to arise," and "to place." Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

Which" is from ho, which is the masculine, singular article.

"The way" is from hodos, which means literally "the way" or "the road" but it also means "travel" and "journey." It is used to mean "a way of doing things", "a method", or "a philosophy of life." It is interesting that a term joining a path with philosophy exists in many languages from the west to the east.

"Whole" is from holos, which means "the whole", "entire", "complete", "complete in all its parts" and "the universe". As an adverb, it means "wholly", "altogether", "entirely", "on the whole", "speaking generally", "utter," "actually", and "really". -- The word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole." It is used as an adverb, which can mean "wholly", "really", "entirely", or "generally speaking."

"Be...like" is from homoioo, which means "to make like", "to become like", "to liken," and "to compare. -- The verb translated as "be...like" is a verb that means "to make like" and, in the passive, as used here, "to become like."

Like is from homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally." -- The word translated as "like" means "like", "resembling," and "matching."

"Will I profess" is from homologeo, which means to agree with,""to say the same thing as", "to correspond," "to have to do with", "to be coordinated", "to be suitable for", "to agree to a thing," :"to grant", "to concede", "to acknowledge,"to promise to", "to come to terms", "not to deny," and "to praise." Literally, it means "to say the same." -- "Confess" is from a word which means "to agree with" and "to say the same as another."

"That" is from hopos, which is a conjunction that means "in such a manner as", "in order that", "in the manner in which", "how," [with negative] "there is no way that," and [in questions] "in what way." -- The word translated as "that" is one of those Greek words that introduce a new phrase that offers an explanation. It can be translated as a dependent clause, but if we start a new sentence with it, we get fewer run-on sentences.

"Where" is from hopou, which means "somewhere", "anywhere", "wherever," and "where."

"The hour" is from hora, which means "any period", "season," (especially springtime), "year' (generally), "climate" (as determined by seasons), "duration", "the twelve equal parts into which the period of daylight was divided", "the fitting time" (for a task). -- The word translated as "hour" means a period of time, generally, as we might say "moment."

""His" is from hos, the possessive pronoun which means "his", "her," or "mine" in its various forms (hê, hon).

(article) "Unto them that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "who" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." It could also be a demonstrative pronoun, that often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

"This" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause..

"How" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." -- The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

"As" is from hosper, which means "the very man who", "the very thing, which", "the same as", "wherefore," and "although." -- The Greek word translated as "as" indicates a match with a person or thing.

"Whatsoever" is from hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as." -- The word translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as", ""as much as," and similar ideas of comparison.

"Wherefore" is from hoste, which marks the power or virtue by which one does a thing, "as being", "inasmuch as," expresses the the actual or intended result of the action in the principal clause: "as", "for," implying " on condition that," at the beginning of a sentence, to mark a strong conclusion, "and so", "therefore," and with subj. " in order that." -- "So that" is from an adverb that marks the power or virtue by which one does a thing. At the beginning of a sentence, it marks a strong conclusion.

"That" is from hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

"When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)." -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

Here" is hode, the demonstrative pronoun which means "this" in the sense of "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person (its use here), it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present."

"In hither" is from hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here." = The word translated as "in hither" means in manner, "in this way," referring to manner, or "here," referring to place.

"Oaths" is from horkos, which means "the object by which one swears", "oath", "sworn compact," and Horkos, the divinity who punishes the perjurer.

"Then" is from hote, which means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

"That" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

"The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child." It refers to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Christ also used it metaphorically to describe those that follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

"Us" is from humas, which is the 1st person, plural, accusative pronoun.

"This" is from houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why." -- "This" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." -- The word translated in KJV as "thus" is in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

"I go" is from hupago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go your way" is from a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

"Shoes" is from hupodema, which means "a sole bound under the foot with straps," and "a sandal." -- "Shoes" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

"On our part" is from hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

"Of" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by", "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause). -- The word translated as "of" primarily means "by", "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

"Hypocrites" is from hypokrites, which means "an interpreter", "an actor", "a stage player," and "a dissembler." -- The Greek for "the hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. The primary meaning during Christ's era was "an actor."

"Shall endureth" is from hypomeno, which means "stay behind", "await", "bide", "stand one's ground", "stay firm," and "dare to do." - The Greek word translated as "shall endureth" means "one staying behind", "one awaiting," or "one standing firm." It's literal meaning is "remain under."

(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. -- The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners.

"You" is from humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners.

(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

(pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing all of Christ's listeners.

(pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is from hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you." -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you." It is plural.

"The officer" is from hyperetes, which means "rower", "underling", "servant", "attendant", "subordinate," and "aides-de-camp."

"Be lifted up" is from hypsoo (hupsoo), which means "to lift high", "to raise up." It is a metaphor for "to elevate" and "to exalt."

"Behold is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see." -- "Behold" is from an adverb meaning meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!" In a humorous vein, this about how Christ uses this like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or "voila" in French. "Look!" or "See!" comes closest in English.

"Physician" is from iatros, which means "one who heals", "medic", "surgeon," or "midwife." -- The word translated as "physician" is generally means "one who heals."

"Fish" is from ichthys, which means "fish" and, in the plural, "fish market." -- "Fish," as a protein, was a luxury in Christ's era compared with bread. It also later became a metaphor for Christ, but only because of its spelling was a code for Christ's name.

(adj sg masc acc) "His" is from idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual." -- The word translated as "his" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

"Jot" is from iota, which means the Greek letter iota, "line", "stroke," and anything very small.

"Whole" is from ischuo (ischyo) which means "to be strong", "to be powerful", "to prevail", "to be worth," and "to be equivalent to." -- The word translated as "whole" is a verb that means "to be strong", "to be able," or "to have powerful." It is the present plural participle of verb, used as the sentence's subject.

"Israel" is from Israel, which means "Israel." -- The word translated as "Israel" comes from the Hebrew, not the Greek.

"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

"New" is from kainos, which means "new", "fresh", "newly made", "newly invented," and "novel." -- The word translated as "new" is different than the common Greek word for new. Many of their meanings overlap, but this word also means "of a new kind."

"And...I" is from kago, a contraction of kai ego. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

"Good" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." -- The word translated as "good" referring to the "fruit" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is different than the verb above. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

"Shall be called" is from kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand." -- The term translated as "call" is like our word "call" because it means both "to summon" and also "to name," but it does not as clearly mean "to address."

"Covered" is from kalypto, which means tp "cover", "protect (of armor)", "hide", "conceal", "cover with dishonor", "throw a cloud over," and "put over as a covering." -- "Covered" is from a word that means to "cover," "hide," and has the sense of to "cover with dishonor." It is a participle ("covering") in the past that is in the form that indicates something acting on itself, (has covered itself).

"And...me" is a contraction kamoi from kai moi, meaning "and...me. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "Me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

"Light" is from kaio, which means "to kindle", "to set on fire", "to burn," and "to bake pottery."

"Due season" is from kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit." -- "The time" is from a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

"And there" is from kakei, which means "there", "in that place", "what is or happens there", "events there", "then [rarely of time]," and "in an intelligible world." -- "And there" is translated from a Greek word meaning "in that place" but in logic means "the intelligible world."

"Sick" is from kakos, which means "bad", "mean", "base", "ugly", "ill-born", "evil", "worthless", "sorry", "pernicious," and "ill." -- The word translated as "sick" is an adjective which means many different forms of "bad," including "ugly", "low born", "craven," and "ill." In the NT, it is often translated as "evil." More about it in this article.

"Of heart" is from kardia, which means "heart (the physical organ)", "the seat of emotions (especially passion, rage, and anger)", "inclination", "desire," "purpose", "mind", "the pith (in wood), and "the deep (of the sea)." -- "Heart" is from the Greek word that means "heart" both the physical organ and as the seat of emotions, which we discuss in a larger Greek context in this article here. However, this phrase can be read as defining the "heart" and both the "soul" and "the mind".

"Fruit" is from karpos, which means "fruit", "the fruits of the earth", "seed", "offspring", "returns for profit," and "reward." -- The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit", "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors."

Mote" is from karphos, which means "any small dry body", "dry stalk", "dry twigs", "chips," "chaff," "straws", "bits of wool", "toothpick", "a small piece of wood on which the watchword was written," and "ripe fruit[plural],." -- The Greek term translated as "mote" is means something small like "twig", "straw," or "chaff." These terms, especially "chaff" have the sense of "trash", "rubbish," and "remains."

"Against" is from kata, which, as a preposition, means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally." As an adverb, it means "according as", "just as", "in so far as", "wherefore", "like as if" and "exactly as."

"Come upon" is from katalambano, which means "to seize", "to lay hold of," [later] "to arrive at a place", "to seize for oneself", "to be possessed [passive of persons]", "to overtake", "to seize with the mind", "to comprehend", "to catch", "to find on arrival", "to come up with", "to hold down", "to repress", "to get under", "to hold [breath", "to bind", "to compel", "to restrain", "to force", "to convict," and "to condemn."

"Have nests" is from kataskenosis, which means "encamping", "taking up one's quarters," and "resting place (of birds)." -- The term translated as "have nests" is a noun primarily "camping." When applied to birds, it means a perch. The only translation of this word to mean "nests" that I can find is in this verse.

"Clean" is from katharos, which means "physically clean", "spotless", "clear", "pure (water)", "clear of objects", "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound." -- The Greek word translated as "clean" means "physically clean", "spotless," "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound."

"Be clean" is from katharizo, which means "to clean", "to clear the ground of weeds,""prune away", "to remove dirt", "to purify,"and "to remove impurities." It is also used to describe the removal of the inedible parts from grain (winnowing), clearing weeds from a field, pruning a plant and so on.-- The Greek word translated as "be clean," means to remove dirt. It is used for a lot of specific types of "cleaning" including cleansing a person of leprosy but it also has a general meaning of "purifying" anything.

"Seat" is from kathedra, which means "a chair", "a seat" "a sitting position", "the sitting part", "the posterior,""sitting idle," "inaction", "the chair [of a teacher]", "a session," and "a throne," is used to denote a position of power. From the Greek kata("down") hedraios ("to settle") .

"Sit" is from kathizô, which means "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint", "to establish", "to put in a certain condition", "to reside", "to sink down", "to run aground [for ships]," "to recline at meals," and "to settle." From the Greek kata("down") hedraios ("to settle") .

"How" is from kathos, which means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

"Head" is from kephalê (kephale), which means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing. -- The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

"Thieves" is from kleptês (kleptes), which means a "thief", "cheat," and "knave."

"To steal" is from klepto (klepto) which means "to steal", "to cheat", "to spirit away", "to conceal", "to keep secret", "to do secretly", "to seize or occupy secretly", "to bring about secreand "to do secretly or treacherously."

"Bed" is from kline, which means "that on which one lies", "couch," and a "grave-niche." -- The world translated as "bed" means "that on which one lies," but it also means a "grave-niche."

"Tittle" is from keraia, which means "the horn of an animal", "the antenna of crustaceans", "a bow", "an instrument for blowing", "a drinking horn", "horn points [for writing instruments]", "objects shaped like horns", "the wing [of an army]", "branch of a river", "corps of men", "sailyard", "mountain peak," and "anything made of horn." The small apostrophe like mark to distinguish numbers from letters in Greek is horn-shaped and therefore called a keraia.

"Preach" is from kerysso, which means "to be a herald", "to summon by a herald", "proclaim", "call upon", "announce", "declare," and "command publicly." Only in the NT is it translated as "preach" or "teach pubicly." -- The word translated as "preach" means "to act as a herald", "to proclaim," and "to declare."

"Ye shut up" can be one of two words. One is kleio, which means "to shut", "to close", "to bar", "to block up", "to shut in", "to confine," and "to shut up." It is a metaphor for causing the heavens to withhold rain. However, this form of the word is also a form of the verb kleo, which means to "tell of", "make famous," and" "celebrate." -- The word translated as "ye shut up" is an entertaining bit of word play. It is a verb that means "to close" or "to shut in," but, in this form, it is also the a similar form of another verb that means "to make famous" and "to celebrate in song." The listener would heard the sense of "celebrate" initially, but the sense of "close" comes later in the verse.

."Will inherit" is from kleronomeo, which means "to inherit", "to acquire", "to receive possession of", "to obtain", "to be an heir," and "to leave an heir behind."

"Town" is from kome, which means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city. -- "Town" is from a word meaning a village where farmer lived close to their fields, rather than a place of trade and commerce or for a specific quarter of a larger city.

"The dust" is from koniortos, which means "dust raised or stirred up", "cloud of dust," and more generally,"dirt," or "sweepings," and, as a metaphor, "dirty fellow." -- The word translated as "dust" means a cloud of dust or dirt. It is also a metaphor for a dirty fellow.

"They toil" is from kopiao, which means "to be tired", "grow weary", "to be tired", "grow weary", "work hard", "toil", "strive", "struggle", "come to rest," and "arrive at a state of saturation."

"A grain" is from kokkos, which means "a grain" and "a seed", "testicles," and it is a metaphor for a "grain of sense." -- The word translated as "grain" means "kernel," or "grain." It can also mean "seed." However, it is not the most common word for a "seed" in Greek which is sperma in Greek.

"The world" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." It is a form of the is verb kosmeô, which means "to order", "to arrange", "to rule", "to adorn" (especially women), and "to equip." It especially means controlling and arranging an army. -- Christ uses the word translated as "the world" to mean "the world order," specifically the powers-that-be. More about this word in this article about related words.

"Provide" is from ktaomai, which means to "acquire", "get specifically for oneself", "procure for oneself", "win", "bring upon oneself (of consequences)," and "have in store (opposite of echo, "having in hand"). -- The term translated as "provide" means "to acquire," but specifically for yourself. It also means "to possess" in the sense of having something stored in opposition to echo, having it in hand. With the "in" preposition it seems to be used as "store."

"Judge" is from krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way. -- The term used here for "judge" is a much more complicated idea. Unlike most words, which Christ uses specifically, he uses this word in a variety of senses simply because no English word corresponds to it precisely. He can mean "judge", "criticize", "decide", "discriminate," and "separate," depending on the context. We try to keep as closely as possible to the primary meaning of "separate" except when it doesn't fit.

"Lilies" is from krinon, which means "white lily", "Lilium candidum", "symbolic of death", "Egyptian bean", "kind of choral dance", "kind of loaf," and "architectural ornament."

"Judgment" is from krisis, which means "separating", "distinguishing", "judgment", "choice", "election", "trial", "dispute", "event," and "issue." -- The Greek word translated as "judgment" means distinguishing among choices and "separating" things. Christ uses it in a variety of ways, though the KJV usually translates it as "judgment." It also means a "turning point," since it is the source of the meaning of "crisis" has in English. Only secondarily does it means "judgment" as in a court judgment.

"The judge" is from krites, which means "judge", "umpire," and "interpreter."

"Secret" is from kryptos, which is an adjective meaning "hidden", "secret", "concealed", "in disguise [of people]", "secret service," and "deep-seated." -- The word translated as "secret" also means "hidden" and concealed."

"Knock" is from krouo, which means to "strike", "smite", "strike one against another", "strike together", "knocking", "examine", "try", "prove," and "knock at the door [on the outside]." -- The word translated as "knock" also means "to examine" and "to prove.

"Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." -- The word translated as "master" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

"I have spoken" is from laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle", "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. -- The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter", "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Christ uses it to capture the idea of "pass on," because that captures both someone gossiping and an oracle does. The word is somewhat self-effacing.

"Receiveth" is from lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion." -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing." It is an infinitive, "to get."

"It giveth light" is from lampo, which means "to shine forth", "to ring loud and clear," and "to illuminate."

"Serve" is from latreuo, which means "to work for hire or pay", "to be subject or enslaved to", "to serve", "to be devoted to," and "to serve the gods with prayers and sacrifices."

"I tell" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

"Lepers" is from lepros, which "scaly," scabrous," and "rough" and is used to describe the leprous. -- "Leper" is from an adjective that means "scaly," scabrous," and "rough". It describes any skin problem, not just the disease leprosy.

"White" is from leukos, which means "light", "bright", "clear", "brilliant," and the colors "white" and "pale gold." It is a metaphor for "clear", "distinct," and "plain."

"Word" is from logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value." -- "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words than end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article.

"Candle" is from lychnos, which means "portable light," or "lamp."

"Candlestick" is from lychnia, which means "lamp stand."

"The wolf" is from lykos (lukos), which means "wolf", "grisly", "jackals", "anything shaped like a hook", "a kind of noose," and "an engine of war for defending gates." -- The Greek word for "wolves" means wolves or jackals, but it is also the name for anything shaped like a hook. It is in the possessive modifying "midst", "competition," and "difference." The wolves are not a flock or a group, though many, but separated and in competition with a group.

"He that is washed" is from luou, which "to wash", "to wash the body", "to bathe," and is a metaphor for "to purify."

()"Loosen" is from lyo, (luo) which means "loosen", "unbind", "unfasten", "unyoke", "unharness", "release", "deliver", "give up", "dissolve", "break up", "undo", "destroy", "repeal", "annul", "break", "solve", "fulfill", "atone for", "fulfill," and "pay." -- The word translated as "loosen" means to "unbind"and means "to annul" a law. It is the same word Christ uses to refer to "breaking" commandments.

(noun sg masc nom) "Stone" is from lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones. -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

"Blessed" is from makarios which means "blessed", "prosperous", "happy", "fortunate," and "blissful." -- The word "blessed" in Greek is from an adjective a noun meaning "happy" or "fortunate" but with the sense of favored by God. It can also mean "wealthy" with in the sense of "the wealthy" (men with a fortune).

"Much" is from mallon, which is the comparative form of mala which means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

"Testimony" is from martyrion, which means "testimony," and proof." -- "Testimony" is from the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was.

) "Ye be witness" is from martyreo, which means "to bear witness", "to give evidence", "give a good report", "testify to," and "acknowledge the value of." It is the basis for our word "martyr." == "Witness" is from the Greek ver that means "to give testimony" and "to bear witness." It has the sense of being true testimony. It is the verb form of the Greek word for "testimony" and "proof," which is the source of our word "martyr," and its funny spelling.

"They will scourge" is from mastigoo, which means "to whip", "to flog," and, in the passive, "to be whipped." -- "Scourge" is translated from a Greek word that means "to whip" and "to flog."

"Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

"Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not." -- The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

"Great" is from megas, which means "big", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "great", "mighty", "strong (of the elements)","loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days). -- The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

(adj sg masc nom comp) "Greatest" is from meizon which means "bigger", "higher", "longer," and "greater" and is the comparative form of megas, which means "big" and "great." The superlative form "greatest" is megistos, μέγιστος.-- "Greatest" is an adjective which is the comparative form of the word meaning "big" or "great." It means "bigger", "higher", "longer", "greater" and simply, "superior." When it is introduced by an article, it means "the greater." It is not the superlative form.

"Black" is from melas, which means "black", "dark", "murky", "swarthy", "indistinct [of a voice]", "obscure", "enigmatic," and "malignant [of character]."

"Premeditate" is from meletao, which means "take thought or care for", "attend", "study", "pursue", "exercise," and "train." "Given" is from didômi (didomi), which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," and "to describe."

"Members" is from melos, which means "limb", "feature", "form", "a musical phrase," and "the music to which a song is set."

"Indeed" is from men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." Used with the conjunction de, as it is here, it points out the specific word being contrast after the conjunction. In English, we usually say, one one hand...on the others... See the article here for specific uses with other particles. -- The "indeed" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by teh "but" phrase.

"Dwells" is from meno, which, as a verb, it means "stand fast" (in battle), "stay at home", "stay", "tarry", "remain as one was", "abide", and (transitive) "await." -- The word translated as "abide" has more of a sense of to "stay" or "remain," not necessarily dwelling in a place, though the KJV often treats it that way.

"Thought" is from merimnao , which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]." -- "Take no thought" is translated from a Greek word that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English.

"His portion" is from meros, which means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes,""proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole).

"The midst" is from mesos, which means "middle", "middle point", "midway between", "offered for competition", "deposited," "by the middle", "by the waist", "impartial", "inter-mediate", "indeterminate", "things indifferent (neither good nor bad)", "middling", "moderate", "midst", "intervening space", "intervening", "difference", "in a moderate degree", "in the mean," and "equator." -- The word translated as "the midst" generally means "middle" but has a lot of special meanings with different prepositions. One of those with the "in" is "offer for competition" and "middle point." It also means "difference."

"With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward." -- "After" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It is not the term usually translated as "after."

"Remove" is from metabaino, which means "to pass over", "pass from one state to another", "change", "make a transition", "to pass to another place or state," and "to carry over." -- The verb translated as "remove" means "to pass over" or "to make a change."

"Neither" is from mete, which means "and not" and "either...or." It is used mostly double. A variation on mede.

"Mother" is from mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin." -- "Mother" is from the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

Untranslated is metis, which is an the adverb, meaning "let alone", "much less", "do I [in direct questions], : "let alone", "much less", "lest any one", "lest anything", "that no one," and "that nothing." Or it could be the dative form of the noun meaning "wisdom", "skill", "craft", "counsel", " plan," and "undertaking."

"Little ones" is from mikros, which means "small", "little," and "young." It is one of several words Christ uses to refer to children.

"Hate" is from miseo, which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated." --

"Hated" is from a Greek verb meaning "to hate."

"Reward" is from misthos, which means "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, "pay", "hire", "fee", "recompense," and "reward." -- The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "compensation," what you receive for doing work. In Christ's teaching, there is spiritual compensation and worldly compensation.

"Rememberest" is from mnaomai, which means "to remind", "to put in mind", "to recall to memory", "to remember," and "to give heed to."

"A bushel" is from modios, which measures 7.8 dry quarts about 1/4 of a bushel and vessels, jars or baskets, of that volume.

"Me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- The "me" is in the dative, which has a number of uses in Greek.

"Commit adultery" is from moicheuo, which means "commit adultery with a woman, " "to debauch a woman," and generally, "to commit adultery with anyone." It is a metaphor for "worshiping idolatrously." -- Christ uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly than its general meaning of having sex with a person not your spouse. He uses it more generally to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray".

"Only" is from monos (monos), which means "alone,""solitary," "only," "single," "unique," "made in one piece," "without [someone]," "only [something]", "unique", "one above all others," and "on one condition only."

"Lost his savour" is from moraino, which means "to play a fool", "to act foolishly", "to be silly," and "to be insipid."

"Thou fool" is from môros (moros), which means "dull", "stupid", "sluggish," 'insipid", "blind," and "folly."

"Moses" is from Moyses, which means "Moses".

"My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

"Yes" is from nai, which means "yea,""yes", "truly," and similar ideas.

"The dead" is from nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic" -- The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spirtual dead, and inanimate matter.

"New" is from neos, which means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". and as an adverb of time, "lately", "just now", "anew," and "afresh," --

"Fast" is from nêsteuô (nesteuo), which means "fast" and "to abstain from."

"Spin" is from netho, which means " to spin."

"Wash" is from nipto, which means specifically "to wash hands or feet," and generally "to clean", "to purge," and "to wash off."

"Law" is from nomos, which means "anything assigned", "a usage", "custom", "law", "ordinance," or "that which is a habitual practice." It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal." -- The Greek word translated as "law" describes the social norms, which can be from "tradition", "common practice," or the "laws." Christ also uses it to refer to the first five books of the OT written by Moses.

"Now" is from nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

"He" is from which is the singular, masculine article (nominative) or neuter demonstrative pronoun (nom. or acc.), "the", "he," and "that" referring to a noun.

"Small" is from oligos, which means "little", "small", "slight", "few," and "weak." As an adverb it means "a little", "slightly," and "little."

"Oh ye of little faith" is from oligopistos, which means literally, "small trust." It is a word built of two words. From oligos, which means "little", "small", "slight", "few," and "weak." As an adverb it means "a little", "slightly," and "little." "Faith" is from pistis, which means "confidence", "assurance", "trustworthiness", "credit", "a trust," "that which give confidence," and, as a character trait, "faithfulness." -- "Unbelief" is from a word that means small or little trust.

"Know" is from oida which is a form of eido, (eidon) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." -- The word translated as "know" means primarily "to see" and is used to mean "know' as we use the word "see" to mean "know" in English.

"House" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household." -- The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all propery owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. We might say "estate" in English to capture this idea.

) "Ye build" is from oikodomeo,which means to "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." --- "Ye build" is from a word that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify."

"House" is from oikos, which means "house", "dwelling place", "room", "home", "meeting hall", "household goods", "substance," and "ruling family." It is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. -- The Greek word translated as "house," is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. It means the household or clan that lives in the building as well.

"Swear" is from omnyo, 2nd sg aor imperat mid) which means "to swear to a thing", "to take an oath", "to promise one will", "give word of honor", "swear by," and "affirm or confirm by oath."

"Revile" is from oneidizô (oneidizo), which means "to cast in [one's teeth]", "to make a reproach", "to reproch," "to upbraid," and "to chide."

"Name" is from onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply means a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the things itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

"Wine" is from oinos, which means "wine" and "fermented juice of any kind." -- The word translated as "wine" means "wine" or any fermented juice. Wine, however, is Christ's metaphor for mental thought, the drink affecting the mind. More about this in this article.

"Shall see" is from optanomai, which means "to see", "to look", "to aim at", "to look towards", "to have sight", "to take heed," (in transitive) "to behold", "to perceive", "to observe", "to look out for," and "to be seen (passive)." It is a metaphor for mental sight, "to perceive", "to discern", "to see visions", "to appear in visions (passion), and "to interview."

"Snake" is from ophis, which means "serpent", "a serpent-like bracelet", "a specific constellation", "a creeping plant," and "a type of fish." It is a metaphor for "an arrow." -- The word translated as "serpent" is also a kind of fish. The "serpent" was used by Christ both as a metaphor for wisdom (Mat.10:16) and, of course, an evil cunning.

"Debts" is from opheilema, which means "that which is owed," and "debt." -- This word "debts" is sometimes translated as "sins" or "trespasses," but in the original Greek, it has only one meaning, "that which is owed." In this respect, the KJV is more accurate than more recent translations that render it differently for philosophical reasons.

"Debtors" is from opheiletes, which means "a debtor", "a person who owes a debt" or "one who is under a bond." -- The word for "debtor" is a form of the word for "debt" used above. It means someone who owes something, that is, someone who was under a bond. In Christ's era, a person under a bond was almost a slave until the debt was paid.

"Profiteth" is from opheleo, which means "to help", "to aid", "to succor", "to be of use or service," "to enrich," and "to benefit." -- The Greek word translated as "profiteth" in the KJV (and "accomplishes" or "is" in other translations) means "to help" or "to be of benefit."

"Snake" is from ophis, which means "serpent", "a serpent-like bracelet," and "a creeping plant." It is a metaphor for "an arrow." -- The Greek word for "snake" is the common word for snake and snake-like things. This is a reference to the Hebrew in Genesis 3:1, where the serpent is described as the cleverest of all animals. The bronze or brass snake raised by Moses in the desert to cure the Israelites from snakebite is an symbol for Christ being raised on the cross, Jhn 3:14.

"Eye" is from ophthalmos, which means "eye", "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]." -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". It is a metaphor for "cheer."

"Angry" is from orgizo, which means "to be made angry", "to be provoked to anger," and "to be irritated."

"Mountain" is from oros, which means "mountain", "hill", "canton," and "parish." In Egypt, it was also used to mean the "desert" and a place of burial. It's homonymoros means a "boundary", "landmark", "time limits", "decisions of judges", "memorial stones and pillars," "standard", "measure", "term (in logic)", "definition", "terms," and "conditions." Another, similar word, oreus, which matches oros in some forms means "mule." --The word translated as "mountain" means "mountain" or "hill" but it could also be the word which means "mule." The word is in a form that could indicating the person address, but that form has a number of uses and isn't suggest by the form of the following verb.

"Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

"Not" is from ouchi, an adverb which means "no", "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," "notwithstanding", "yet", "still", "never yet", "for not", "indeed", "for surely not", "no,—certainly not", "for I don't suppose," and "for in no manner." -- The word translated as "not" is a different form of the usual Greek negative of fact meaning "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," and "notwithstanding."

"Never" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

(exclam) "Woe" is from ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas" but it can be used sarcastically. -- "Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." However, Christ seems to use it humorously. Every verse in which it appears have the hallmarks of Christ's humor. Today we would say "so sad [for you]" or "boo-hoo to you." The word is very like the Jewish, "oy veh" which can be used to express sorry but with is more commonly used cynically. More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

(adv/conj) "Neither" is from oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not", "neither", and "nor." As an adverb, it meams "not at all" and "not even."-

"No man" is from oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." -- The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

"Henceforth" is from ouketi, which means "no more", "no longer", "no further" and generally, "not now."

"Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore." -- The Greek word translated as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative.

"Heaven" is from the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate." -- The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.

"Neither" is from oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

"Old" is from palaios, which means "old in years," "ancient," (in a good sense) "venerable", "held in esteem," (in a bad way) "antiquated", "obsolete," and "in an old way." -- The word translated as "old" means old in years both in a good sense and a bad one. In a good sense, it means "venerable" and in a bad sense, "obsolete."

"Again" is from palin (palin), which means "back", "backward", "contradiction", "again", "once more," and "in turn."

"With" is from para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)." -- The Greek preposition translated "from," primarily means "besides" and "beyond." It also has a number of specialized meanings.

"Deliver you up" is from paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow." -- "Shall deliver up" is from a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

"Saving" is from parektos, which means "beside" or "except."

"Shall...pass" is from parerchomai (parerchomai), which means "go by", "pass by", "outstrip" (in speed), "pass away", "outwit", "past events" (in time), "disregard", "pass unnoticed," and "pass without heeding." -- The phrase "pass away" is from a verb that means "go by", "pass by", "outstrip" (in speed), and "pass away".

"The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others, Christ uses it to refer to their ancestors, that is, "forefathers."

"All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

"All" is from passo, which means "to sprinkle."

"Which has sent" is from pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

(number) "Five" is from pente, the number five.

"Bag" is from pera, which means a "leather pouch to carry food", "a bag for traveling," or "a wallet." -- "Scrip" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack.

"As touching" is from peri, which means "round about (Place)", "around", "about", "concerning", "on account of", "in regard to", "before", "above", "beyond," and "all around." -- The Greek word translated as "of" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

"Whatever is more" is from perissos, which means "beyond the regular number of size", "out of the common", "extraordinary" "more than sufficient", "superfluous", "useless", "excessive", "extravagant", "over-wise", "over-curious", "abundantly," and "remarkable."

"Doves" is from, peristera, which means "common pigeon" or "dove." -- The Greek word for "doves" means either "doves" or "pigeons." Doves were a form of sacrifice required in Leviticus and used at the temple, so it becomes a symbol for purity.

"Birds" is from peteinon, which as an adjective means "able to fly", "full-fledged," and "winged," and, as a noun, "winged fowl," and "a bird." -- The Greek word translated as "birds" is normally an adjective means "able to fly" and "winged," but it is used as a noun here, so "those that can fly" or, more simply, "birds."

"They...be seen" is from phaino , which means "to shine", "to give light," and "to appear." In its transitive form, not used here, it means "bring to light." --

The Greek word translated as "may be seen" is not a verb normally translated as "to see." It primarily means "to shine." The image is of actors wanting to shine among men. This is still a pretty good description of what actors want.

"Pharisees" is from Pharisaios, which means "the separated", "the separate ones", " separatist" and refers to the religious sect. The word comes from the Hebrew, pharash, which means "to distinguish." So the sense is also "the distinguished" or "the elite." -- "Pharisees" is an example of where we use the Greek word as the name of the relitious sect, instead of translating it. In Greek, the word means the "separatists" or "the judgmental," but it is from a Hebrew word meaning "distinguished" or "elite."

"They love" is from phileo , which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of." -- "They love" is from the Greek word that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. More on the two types of "love" in this article.

"Fear" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something." -- "Fear" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." It is not a command, as you would think from the KJV.

"Holes" is from pholeos, which means "den", "caves," or "lair," referring to the homes of molluscs, serpents, and foxes, and animal homes in general. Interestingly enough, it also means "schoolhouse." -- The term translated as "holes" means "den," or "lair," and interestingly enough, "schoolhouse."

"Voice" is from phone, which means "sound", "tone", "sound of a voice", "speech", "voice", "utterance", "cry" [of animals], "sounds" [of inanimate objects], "faculty of speech", "phrase", "saying", "rumor," and "report."

"Calleth" is from phoneo which means "to produce a sound or tone", "to speak loudly or clearly" (of men), "uttering cries" (of animals), "affirm" (in court), "call by name", "command," and "speak of."

"Thou shalt...kill" is from phoneuō, which means "to kill", "to murder", "to be slain [passive], and "to stain with blood." -- "Kill" is from the Greek word for "murder," and killing a way the stains the murder with blood.

"The light" is from phos, which means "light", "daylight [primarily], "illumination [of things and of the mind]", "light [of the eyes], "window", "opening", " ublic visibility," and "publicity." Christ uses it as a metaphor for "knowledge," but in Greek is is also a metaphor for "deliverance", "happiness", "victory," and "glory."

"Prison" is from phylake, which means "a watching or guarding", "a guard", "a ward", "a watch", " "a station", "a post," "a keeping", "a preserving", "safekeeping", "a safe-guard," and "a precaution."

"Ye shall drink" is from pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." -- The word seems chosen for its double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

"Hunger" is peinaô (peino), which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.

"Temptation" is from peirasmos, which means a "trial", "worry," and only by extension "temptation." -- The Greek word translated as "temptation" doesn't primarily means that. It means a "trial" as in a "worry." Christ doesn't use this term but another Greek word to refer to court trials. It could mean a "trial" as a "test." Again, this is an uncommon word in Christ's teaching.

"Was arrayed" is from periballo, which means "to throw around", "to put on", "to encompass", "to surround", "to bring under one's power", "amplify", "expand", "appropriate mentally", "comprehend", "to excel", "to surpass", "throw beyond," and "beat in throwing." In the passive, it means "to have put around oneself." "to be involved in," and "to have come into possession of one."

"Walk" is from peripateo, which means "to walk up and down", "to walk about," and "to walk about while teaching."

"Eat" is from phago) which is a form of the word, phagein, which means to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour." -- The word translated as "eat" is one of the two common words used to mean "eat."It means "to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour."

"Fleeth" is pheugo, which means "to flee", "to take flight", "avoid", "escape", "seek to avoid", "to be expelled", "to be driven out", "go into exile", "go into banishment", "to be accused", "to be plead in defense," and "to flee from a charge." -- "Flee" is translated from a Greek word that means "to flee", "escape," and "to take flight."

"Wise" is from phronimos, which means "in one's right mind", "showing presence of mind," and "prudent." In Hebrew, the source word is arum, which means "crafty", "shrewd," and "sensible." -- The Greek term used for "wise" means "in one's right mind", "showing presence of mind," and "prudent."

"Shall...fall" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)." -- "Fall" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall" and "to fall down." It is the root word for dozens of Greek terms involving moving from a higher state to a lower one. Like our word "to fall" it has a number of special meanings including "to fall into a given class", "to prostrate", "to fall from power", "to perish," and so on. Here, it is in the form which indicates someone acting on themselves, so "lower themselves down."

"Do you...believe" is from pisteuo, which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing." -- The Greek word translated as "believe" does not apply to religious belief as much as it does trusting in other people, especially their word. Christ usually uses it in contexts, as the one here, that apply to trusting words. The negation of "belief" with the objective, instead of subjective, negative, equates trust with a fact.

"Faith" is from pistis, which means "confidence", "assurance", "trustworthiness", "credit", "a trust," "that which give confidence," and, as a character trait, "faithfulness."-- The term translated as "faith" is closer to our idea of having confidence or trust in people, especially their word, rather than having religious belief.

"Of the streets" is from plateia, which is an adjective that means "wide", "broad", "over a wide area", "broad shouldered [of a man]", "far advanced [of seasons]", "strong [oath]", "widespread", "flat of the hand", "frequent," and "street."

"More" is from pleiôn, which means "more [of number, size, extent]", "longer [of time]," "greater than," "further than," (with an article) "the greater number", "the mass or crowd", "the greater part", "the advantage. As an adverb, "more," or "rather." -- The Greek word translated as "more than" is an adjective that means "more" as in "more money." However, its form doesn't seem to match any of the nouns in this part of the verse.

"That which is put in to fill...up" is from pleroma, which means "that which fills", "fullness", "reserves", "mass", "complex", "filling up", "completing," and "fulfillment." -- "That which is put in to fill...up is from a noun that captures various ideas of filling and completing, but here, we might simply say "the filler.

()"Might be fulfilled" is from plêroô (pleroo), which mean "to fill", "to fulfill", "to make complete", "to pay in full", "to make pregnant," and "to fill full." -- "Fill" is from a verb that means "to fill", "to fulfill," and "to fill full."

()"Neighbor" is from plesion, which means "close", "near", "neighboring," and "one's neighbor." -- The word translated as "neighbor" is an adjective meaning "close," and "near." As a noun, it means "one nearby."

"Spirit" is pneuma, which means "blast", "wind", "breath", "the breath of life", "divine inspiration", "a spiritual or immaterial being," and "the spirit" of a man. -- The word translated as "spirit" has been used in the section to mean "non-material beings" but it primarily means "breath", "wind," and "blast." The wind is Christ's metaphor for the spirit (Jhn 3:8). Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical".

"Do" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do." -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service.

"Sold" is from poleo, which means "to sell," "to exchange", "to barter," "to offer to sell," and "to retail." Metaphorically, it means to "give up" and "betray." In the passive, it means "to be sold", "to be offered for sale," and, of persons, "to be bought and sold," and " betrayed." -- "Sold" is from a word that means "to sell" and "to exchange." When this word is applied to people (as it is metaphorically here), it means "to betray" or "to give up."

"City" is from polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties." -- The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today.

"Many" is from polus, which means "many (in number)", "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far", "very much", "a great way," and "long." -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

"Much speaking" is from polylogia, which means "loquacity", "much to say," and "much talk." Its literal meaning is "many words." -- The Greek word translated as "much speaking," means literally "many words" and means "much talk."

"Evil" is from poneros, which means "burdened by toil", "useless," and "worthless." In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly." -- The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "what is worthless."

"Depart" is from poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT. -- The Greek verb translated as "go" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." Since it is in a form that acts on itself, the sense is "take yourselves". -- The Greek verb translated as "depart" means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to depart from life." Christ uses it to say "get away" when followed by "from me." --

"Fornication" is porneia, (porneia) which means "prostitution" for a woman and "fornication" for a man. It is a metaphor for idolatry.

"How" is from pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

"At any time" comes from pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

"Cup" is from poterion, which means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. -- The word for "of the cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Christ as a symbol for sharing burdens.

"Wither" is from pou, which means "where", "at what point," and [of manner] "how." Other forms mean "somewhere", "anywhere", "doubtless," and "perhaps." -- The word translated as "where" is in a form that means "anywhere" or "somewhere."

"Foot" is from pous, which means a "foot", "a talon [of a bird]," and the concept of "to trample" or "to tred upon." -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things. It was the Jewish

"The meek" is from praus, which means "mild", "soft", "gentle", "meek", "making mild," and "taming." As and adverb, "mildly" and "gently."

"Becomes" is from prepo, which means "to be clearly seen", "to be conspicuous", "loud and clear (sounds)", "to be strong or rank (smells)", "to resemble", "to be conspicuously fitting," and "to be seemly."

"Before" is from prin, which means "before", "sooner", "formerly," and "hitherto."

"Before" is from pro, which means (of place) "before", "in front of," (of time) "before," (of preference) "before", "rather than", "more than," and do on.

"Sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks. -- "Sheep" is Christ's symbol for his followers. The Greek word refers to any domesticated animal and works better if translated simple as "flock" or "herd." The flock follows the shepherd, which is above them. It is also together, a united group.

"Take thought beforehand" is from promerimnao, which means "take thought before" from deconstruction. The word only appears here in the gospel. It is made of pros(pros), which means "before" and mermêrizô, which means "to be anxious", "to be in doubt," and "to be thoughtful."

) "The prophets" is from prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will", "interpreter", "keepers of the oracle", "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt", "interpreter," and "herald." It is a verb that means "to shine forth" It is a form of the verb, prophao. which means "to shine forth," or "to shine before." -- The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God", "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople, but their books in the OT. It is from the verb that means "to shine before."

"For" is from pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." -- The word translated as "to" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

"Beware" is the Greek prosecho, which means "hold to", "to offer", "turn to or toward," "to turn your mind toward," "to be on one's guard against", "to take heed", "to pay attention", "to devote oneself to", "to attach oneself", "to continue", "to hold fast to [a thing]," "to have in addition," or "pay court to."

"Pray" is from proseuchomai (proseuchomai), which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing. It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

"Worship" is from proskyneo, which means "make obeisance", "fall down and worship," and specifically means to prostrate yourself before authority, as we would use the Chinese term, "kowtow."

"Thou bring" is from prosphero, which means "to bring to, " "to bring upon", "to apply to," [without dat] "to apply, use, or use", "to add to", "to present", "to offer", "to address [proposals]", "to convey [property]", "to contribute", "to pay", "to be carried towards [passive]", "to attack", "to assault", "to go toward", "to deal with", "to take [food or drink]," to exhibit", "to declare," and "to lead to."

"Face" is from prosopon, which means "face", "countenance." "in front", "facing", "front", "façade", "one's look", "dramatic part", "character", "in person", "in bodily presence", "legal personality", "person," and "feature [of the city, of a person]."

"Shall be added" is from prostithemi, which is formed from two root words that mean "to put towards" and means to "put to", "to hold close", "to apply medicine [to a wound]", "to hand over", "to give something more", "to impose upon", "to attribute to", "to add", "to agree", "to associate with", "to bring upon oneself," and "to apply to oneself." -- The Greek word translated as "shall be added" means "to apply", "to deliver," "to impose upon," and many other meanings. In this context, it works a lot like the English "to hand over."

"First" is from protos. In place, this means "before", "in front," and, as a noun, "the foremost." Of time, it means "former", "earlier," and, as a noun, "the initial." In order, it means "the first." In math, it means the prime numbers. Of rank or degree, it means "superior" or, as a noun, "the highest" or "the best." -- The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

"Before" is from proteros, which means of place: "before", "in front," of time: "former", "earlier", "superior [in rank]," "foremost [in place]", "first [of time]", "first in order of existence [in philosophy]", "primary", "highest degree," as a noun: "first part", "beginning", "primary things", "elements," and, as an adverb, "before", "earlier."

"Life" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul." -- The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary "spirit" or "mind." This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." The use of this word seems to indicate that the words that follow are meant to be interpreted using their emotional, rather than physical meanings.

"Falsely" is from pseudo, which means "to cheat by lies", "to beguile," and "to cheat" or "disappoint" someone about something. In the passive, "to be cheated", "to be deceived" "to be deceived about something," and "to be mistaken about something."

"Heal" is from pterna, which means "heel", "the under part of the heel", "hoof", "heel [of a shoe]", "foot," or a lower part of anything."

"Poor" is from ptochos, which means "beggar", "beggar-woman," and "beggarly."

"Fire" is from pyr (pur), which means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", "hearth-fire", "lightning", "the light of torches," and "heat of fever." -- "Fire" is a noun that means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", and so on, but Christ only uses this word to describe the fire of a trash dump. He usually uses it with the word that is translated as "hell" but which was the name of the burning trash dump outside of Jerusalem.

"Raka" is an untranslated Aramaic word, raka or raqa. It may be from a Hebrew term meaning "empty" or "empty-headed. Others claim it means "I spit on you" in one version of Aramaic. It is agree to be an expression of contempt.

"Staves" is from rhabdos, which means a "magic wand", "fishing-rod", "limed twig (for catching small birds)", "shaft of a hunting-spear", "staff of office", "shepherd's staff or crook", "measuring-rod", "line", "verse", "a critical mark," and "stroke forming a letter." -- "Staves" is translated from a Greek word meaning any type of long pole, primarily those used for gathering food or managing a herd of animals. It also means a staff of authority.

"Smite" is from rhapizō, which means "hit with a stick", "cudgel", "thrash", "to slap a face," generally, "to strike" or "to beat."

"Cloth" is rhakos, which means "ragged, tattered garment", "rags", "tatters", "strip of cloth", "strip of flesh", "rents in the face", "wrinkles," and is a metaphor for "rag," and "remnant." -- The word translated as "cloth" really means a "rag" or "tatter." This is a negative description of the patch and cannot be taken otherwise in an honest translation.

"Break" is from rhegnumi, which means to "break asunder", "rend", "shatter", "break through," and, in the passive, to "break", "break asunder", "burst,""break forth". -- The word translated as "break" means to "burst" or "break through".

"Words" is from rhema, which means "that which is spoken", "word", "saying", "word for word", "subject of speech," and "matter." -- The Greek word translated as "words" is not logos, the Greek word that is almost always translated as "word(s)" in the Gospels, but rhema, which specifically means spoken words, that is, a saying. The English word "remarks" is from the same base and captures this idea well.

"It was said" is from rheo, which means "to say", "to speak", ""to proclaim", "to announce", "to tell", "to order," "to be pronounced [passive]", "to let suffice [passive]", "to have been given orders", "to be mentioned," and "to be specified, agreed, or promised."

"The streets" is from rhyme, which means "force", "swing", "rush [of a body in motion]", "rush", "charge [of soldiers]", "street", "lane," and "alley." -- The Greek word translated as "streets" is not a simple word for street. Its primary meaning is the "force" and "rush" of a body of moving people. It means "streets" in the sense that they hold these people.

"Deliver" is from rhyomai, which means "to draw to oneself", "to draw out of danger", "to rescue", "to save", "to deliver", "to save from an illness", "to shield", "to guard", "to protect, "to draw back", "to hold back", "to check," and "to keep off." -- The Greek word translated as "deliver" primarily means "to draw towards oneself" and "to draw away from danger." Both of these ideas are very evocative in this context. Again, this is an uncommon word for Christ.

"Do sound a trumpet" is from salpizo, which means "blow a trumpet", "sound a trumpet", "give a signal by trumpet", "to announce," and "to proclaim." -- The word translated as "sound a trumpet" means to announce in the same sense that we say "blow your own horn" in English.

"Corrupt" is from sapros, which means "rotten", "putrid", "stale", "rancid", "worn-out," and "mellow [of wine]." --The word translated as "corrupt" means "rancid", "rotten," and "worn out." Since it also means "mellow" when applied to wine, it means food that is either old or bad.

"The flesh" is from sarx (sarx), which means "flesh", "the body", "fleshy", "the pulp of fruit", "meat," and "the physical and natural order of things" (opposite of the spiritual or supernatural). -- The Greek word translated as "the flesh" means "flesh", "meat," and "the physical order of things" as opposed to the spiritual. In contrasting it with "spirit," he is making it clear that he has been using it in the later sense.

"Satan" is satanas, (satanas) which is an Aramaic word meaning "adversary", "opponents," or "one who opposes another in purpose or act. "

"Rent" is from schisma, which means "cleft", "division", "division of aopinion," "dissention," "the vulva," and "furrow (ploughing)." -- The word translated as "rent" means an "opening", "division," or a "tear" but it is also a metaphor about a division of opinion. Here, it is a reference to the division of opinion within Judaism.

"This day" is from semeron, which is an adverb that means "for today" and "on this day."

"Moth"is from ses, which means "moth" and is a metaphor for "book worms."

"Cheek" is from siagōn, which means "jaw", "jaw-bone," and "cheek."

"Mustard seed" is from sinapi which means simply "mustard." -- The word translated as "mustard seed" means simply "mustard." However, the mustard seed was the Jewish metaphor for the smallness of the knowable world compared to the whole universe.

"Offend" is from skandalizo, which means "to cause to stumble", "to give offense," and "to scandalize." --

The key word here, skandalizo, is a "Greek" word that is found only in the Bible. It refers to putting a stumbling block before someone so that they trip and thereby offending them. In English, we would simply say, "trips you up." Though it doesn't sound like it in English translation, Christ uses this word to make light of his affect on the thinking of others.

"Darkness" is skotia, which means "darkness", "dark", "gloomy," [of persons] "in the dark", "in secret," and "secret." It is a metaphor for "obscure,"and "the nether world," and was used as the opposite the Greek word gnome, γνώμη, meaning judgment, opinion, purpose and therefore also a metaphor for "ignorance."

"Of sad countenance" come from skythropos, which means "of sad or angry ", "sullen", "with greater severity," of things: "gloomy", "sad", "melancholy," and "dark and dull [of color]." -- The Greek word translated as "of a sad countenance" is an adjective that literally means "a sullen look."

"You" is from soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you".

"Save" is sozo (soizo), which means "save from death", "keep alive", "keep safe", "preserve", "maintain", "keep in mind", "carry off safely," and "rescue." This is the 3rd person, singular, aortic, passive form. -- "Made whole" is from the Greek word that means "to keep alive" when applied to people or "to keep safe" when applied to things. Christ uses it to mean "rescue" in most cases.

"Body" is soma, which means "body", "dead body", "the living body", "animal body", "person", "human being", "any corporeal substance", "metallic substance", "figure of three dimensions [math]", "solid", "whole [of a thing]", "frame [of a thing]", "the body of the proof", "a body of writings." and "text of a document." -- The word translated as "body" means "body", either living or dead, but it also means anything physical or solid. Like our word "body" it has special meanings such as "body" of proof and the "body" of a document. It is the opposite of "spirit" but more connected to the "soul" because it is part of this life. It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people.

Thine" is from sos, which means "thy", "thine" "of thee," or "from thee."

"Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your." -- The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun.

"They sow" is from speirô (speiro), which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field." -- The Greek word translated as "sow" means specifically to "sow seeds" and "to scatter" as in sowing seeds.

"Thy" is from su which means "you" and "your."

"Grapes" is from staphyle, which means "bunch of grapes", "of ripe, fresh grapes", "uvula when swollen," and "plumb of a level." -- The Greek word translated as "grapes" means "a bunch of grapes. Grapes were generally symbolic of fertility in most cultures but, among the Jews, also of humility between of the similarity between the Hebrew words for them.

) "Crucity" is from stauroo, which means "to stake", "to crucify," "to be fenced with poles" or "piles driven into a foundation." From the root,staros, which means "an upright pole or stake." This term was used for a stake (or "pale") used for impaling and with the Christian era, the cross. -- "Crucify" mean literally "to stake," that is, to drive a stake into the ground. It is from the Greek word for "stake," though it is often translated as "cross" in the Gospels. The Greek verb refers to driving a stake in the ground and was commonly used to describe building a fence. The phrase often translated as "take up your cross" in the Gospels actually means "pull up your stakes," which could mean either fence posts or the stakes or poles that hold up a tent, which is more the source of the English phrase.

"Turn" is from strepho, which means "turn aside", "turn about," "turn over", "rotate", "sprain", "dislocate", "twist", "torture", "return", "plait", "to twist about", "turn and change", "to always be engaged in", "to turn about with oneself", "to wheel about", "give back," and "convert." It is a metaphor for pain.

"Sparrows" is strouthion, which actually means a "tiny sparrows" from strouthos, the word for "sparrow." The word is also a metaphor for a "lecher" or "lewd fellow." -- "Sparrows" is from a word that is the diminutive of the word for "sparrow" so "tiny sparrow." These were sold at the temple as the least expensive animal sacrifices. It is also a metaphor for lechers.

"Figs" is from sykon, which means "fruit of the fig", "large wart on the eyelids", "tumors," and "a woman's sex organ."

"Do men gather" is from sullego, a term meaning "gather", "collect", "come together", "collect", "get together [people]", "compose", "compile", "scrape together", "compile a list of," (middle passive) "collect for oneself", "for one's own use," and (in passive) "come together", "become customary", "come together", "assemble." -- The word translated as "Do men gather" specifically means collecting something for use. The word means a selective choosing rather than an indiscriminate gathering as in the selection of ripe grapes and figs.

"Synagogue" is from synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together." -- The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

"Gather" is from synago, which means "bring together", "gather together," "pit [two warriors against each other]", "join in one", "unite", "make friends of", "lead with one", "receive", "reconcile", "draw together", "narrow", "contract", "conclude [from premises]", " infer," and "prove." --The Greek word translated as "gather" means "to bring together." It has many different uses, but it does not specificlaly mean gathering in the crops. That is why that idea is provided specifically by the phrase that follows.

"Are preserved" comes from syntereo, which means to "keep", "preserve", "maintain", "observe strictly", "watch one's opportunity", "watch over," and "protect." -- The word translated as "are preserved" means "to keep" and "to maintain," but it also means "to observe strictly," referring again, to philosophies.

"Of the council" is from sunedrion (synedrion), which means "council", "meeting", "councils of war," and "meeting room." -- "Councils" is the generic Greek term for "council" or "meeting. It is the word that the name of the great Jewish council, the Sanhedrin was taken from.

"It is better" is from symphero, which means "to bring together", "to gather", "collect", "to confer a benefit", "to be useful", "work with", "be with," and "agree with." In the passive, it means "to come together", "to engage", "to battle," [of events] "to occur", "to happen," and [literally] "to be carried along with."

"Swiftly" is from tachy. In the adjective form it means "swift", "fleet", "quick", "hasty", "rapid", "sudden," and "short." As an adverb, it means "swiftly", "hastily," and (rarely) "perhaps."

"Closet" is from tameion, which means "treasury", "magazine", "storehouse", "store-room", "chamber," and "closet." -- The word translated as "closet" means a "treasury" or a "store room." The idea is a room without windows and just one door. The whole idea is that they were dark and private, not places where people were normally found.

"These things" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." -- The "this" is from a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.

"Perfect" is from teleios, which means as an adjective "perfect", "entire", "without spot or blemish", "of full tally or number", "fully constituted", "valid", "full-grown [of animals]", "accomplished [of persons], "perfect in his kind,""absolute", "final [of judgment]", "fulfilled [of prayers]," "having power to fulfill prayer [of gods]", "all-powerful", "full point," and as an adverb "finally", "absolutely", "with full authority", "absolutely", "thoroughly," and "completely."

"Child" is from teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young." -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

"Gone over" is teleo, which means "to complete", "to fulfill," and "to accomplish." It also means "to bring to perfection", "to pay what one owes," and "to execute a legal document." -- "Gone over" is translated from a Greek word, which means "to complete" and "to accomplish," especially in the sense of having goal. It also means "to bring to perfection."

"End" is from telos, which means "come to pass", "performance", "consummation", "result", "product", "outcome", "end", "achievement", "attainment", "goal", "state of completion", "maturity", "services rendered", "something done", "task", "duty", "toll," and "custom." -- The word translated as "end" means "purpose", "outcome", "something done," or "goal."

"Shall cause to put to death" is from thanatoo, which means "to put to death", "to be made dead (passive)", "to be put to death by sentence of law", "to be fatal," and "to cause death." -- "To cause to be ... put to death" is from the verb form of the word for "death". It means "to put to death," and "to cause death," but it also means "to mortify."

"Death" is from thanatos, which means "death" "kinds of death," specifically, "violent death", "corpse," and "a death sentence." -- "Death" is from the Greek word meaning "death" generally and the death penalty specifically.

"Bury" is from thapto, which also means "to pay the last dues to a corpse", "to honor with funeral rites." --The word translated as "bury" means "to pay the last dues to a corpse", "to honor with funeral rites."

"Be of good cheer" is from tharseô (tharseo), which means "fear not", "have courage", "have confidence", "have no fear," and "make bold." -- The verb translated as "be of good cheer" is from a noun that means courage. It is best translated as "have courage" or "be brave."

"To be seen" is theaomai, which means "to behold", "to gaze with a sense of wonder", "view as a spectator", "to see clearly," and "to contemplate.""Tribulation" is from thlipsis, which means "pressure", "crushing", and "castration". It is a metaphor for "affliction"and "oppression." Earlier in Mat 24:9, it was translated as "afflicted." -- The Greek word translated as "tribulation" means "pressure," which is translated as a metaphor for "oppression." Since it primarily means pressure in the sense of "crushing" (and "castration"), it is a more colorful word than the words we used to describe a time of difficulty. Prior to Christ's use, it appears in Greek literature more as a scientific term than a social description.

"I will" is from thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain", "to hold", "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly". . -- The Greek word translated as "will" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". As an participle, it means "willingly" and "gladly".

"Will" is from the noun, thelema, which means "will" and "pleasure." -- The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires as well as the "will" of character. It mostly means what one wishes or has determined shall be done. It also means a desire or a choice. When applied to people, "desires" works, but when applied to God, the concept "purpose" seems closer to Christ's usage.

"You shall...see" is from theoreo, which means means "to see", "to look at", "to gaze," "to behold," (of the mind) "to contemplate", "to consider", "to observe (as a spectator)", "to gaze", "to gape", "to inspect (troops)" and, in abstract, "to theorize" and "to speculate." It originally means literally, "to be sent to see an oracle." -- The word is also not as simple as "see." It is not one of the common words Christ uses for seeing and being seen. It is a "fancier" word that has more of a sense of gazing at something as a spectator. It originally meant watching an oracle.

"Do they reap" is from therizô (therizo), which means "to do summer work", "to reap", "to mow", "to cut off," and, in some areas, "to plunder." -- The Greek word translated as "reap" means "to do summer work" and "to reap."

"Lay up" is from thesaurizo, which means to "store", " treasure up", "hoard", "lay up treasure", "lay up a store of", "store up for oneself," and "to be reserved[passive]." -- The word translated as "lay up" primarily means "to store" but it has the more specific meaning of storing valuables.

"Treasures" is from thesauros, which means a "store", "treasure", "strong-room", "magazine, "granary", "receptacle for valuables", "safe", "casket", "offertory-box", "cavern," and "subterranean dungeon." -- The word translated as "treasure" is the noun form of the word translated above as "lay up." Its primarily meaning is a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables.

"God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "diety." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

"Hair" is from thrix, which means "human hair", "a single hair", "a horses mane", "sheep's wool", "pig bristles," "a hair's breadth." -- "Hair" is from the Greek word for both the hair of humans and animals.

"Throne" is from thronos, which means "seat", "chair", "seat of state", "chair of a teacher," and "judge's bench."

"Daughter" is the Greek, thygater, which is generally a female descendant, "maidservant", "female slave," and "villages dependent on a city." -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves. It doesn't not start the sentence, but the following word does.

"Sacrifice" is thysia, which means "a burnt-offering", "a sacrifice", "a victim of sacrifice", "mode of sacrifice", "festival at which sacrifices are offered", "rite," and "ceremony." -- Interesting, the Greek terms translated as "sacrifice," does not refer to the act of sacrifice but to "a burnt offering" or "victim." In Hebrew, "sacrifice" is zebach, ("a sacrifice") which is the noun form of zabach, which means "to slaughter" either for sacrifice or for eating.

"The altar" is from thysiastērion , which means "altar."

"Thistles" is from tribolos, which means "various prickly plants", "a threshing-machine (a box with spikes)", "caltrops and other defensive systems with spike," and, as an adjective, "three-tiered" -- The Greek words translated as "thorns" and "thistles" both mean any type of thorny plant. Two different words are used because this is a reference to Gen 3:18, where two different Hebrew words are used. This means that two different Greek words are used in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The same exact ones used here. In Jewish tradition, thorns did not exist in the original creation, but were created after humanity's fall.

"Put" is from tithêmi (tithemi) which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "o deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," "to bear arms [military]," "to lay down and surrender [military]," "to lay in the grave", "to bury," and "to put words on paper [writing]," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind."

"What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." -- The Greek word translated as "some" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." -- The word translated as "what" means primarily means "anything" or "anyone."

"Observe" is from têreô, which means "to watch over", "to guard", "to take care of", "to give heed to", "to keep", "to test by observation or trial," and "to observe."

"So great" is from tosoutos, , which means "so much", "thus much", "so far", "so large", and "so tall". -- "So much" is from a compound adjective that means literally "that which (or who) has to such an degree."

"Then" is from tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

"That" is from touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]." -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

"This" is from toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

"Feedeth" is from trepho, which means primarily, to "thicken or congeal [a liquid]", "cause to grow or increase", "bring up", "rear", "rear and keep [animals, slaves]", "tend", "cherish," "let grow (of parts of the body)", "cherish", "foster", "breed", "produce", "teem [of earth and sea]", "have within oneself", "contain", "maintain", "support," .Pass. "to be bred," and "reared."

"Meat" is from trophe, which means "nourishment", "food", "that which provides sustenance", "provisions", "nurture", "rearing," and "education." -- The word translated as "meat" also means "nourishment", "nurture," and "education."

"He that eateth" is from trogo, which means "to eat vegatable", "to nibble", "to munch," and "to eat fruits or desserts."

"Live" is from zao, which means "to live", "the living," and "to be alive." It is a metaphor for "to be full of life", "to be strong," and "to be fresh."

"Seek" is from zeteo, which means "inquire for", "search for", "seek after", "desire", and "feel the want of." -- The Greek verb translated as "seek ye" has a variety of meaning, but "to aim" comes the closest to capturing the way Christ uses it.

"Life" is from zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Christ uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

"Purses" is from zone, which means "the lower girdle worn by women just above the hips (and therefore related to marrige, intercourse, and childbirth)", " male belt", "a belt used as a purse", "the waist", "anything that goes round like a belt," "one of the zones of the terrestrial sphere," and "one of the planetary spheres." -- "Purses" is a Greek word for the girdle of a woman, worn above the hips, and the belt of a man, worn at the waist and all related ideas to which they are related, such as the waist. It was used as a "purse," when it was a rolled up piece of cloth in which money valuables were secured.

"Quicketh" is from zoopoieo, which means "to make alive", "to bring to life", "to endow with life," and "to preserve alive." -- It is a compound verb, created from the word for "life" and the Greek word that means "to make," which most Bible translations translates a "to do." The word "life" also means "existence.

Phrases

Truly I tell you...

The "verily" phrase is used frequently by Christ as a personal signature. Its vocabulary and meaning is discussed in detail in this article. Currently, "tell you true" is the translation I currently use. Christ makes fun of his frequent use of it. The word translated is as "verily" is an exclamation that means "truly" or "of a truth." It is an untranslated Aramaic word that is echoed by a similar Greek word, and a good piece of evidence that Christ taught in Greek, not Aramaic.

"Verily" is from amen, which is from the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut." -- The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

(1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

You have heard that is is said,,

"Ye hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." -- "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

"That" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- In the Greek source, this is a word here that means "that" or "because." So what follows is a dependent clause, indicating either what they were "saying" or why they were saying it.

(3rd sg aor ind pass) "It hath been said," is from ero, which means "to speak", "to say", "to pronounce", "to tell", "to let suffice", "to announce", "to proclaim," (in passive) "to be pronounced", "to be mentioned", "to be specified", "to be agreed," and "to be promised."

But I tell you....

"I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself." -- The pronoun "I" is added to add emphasis that he is referring to his own words. It is unnecessary because the first person is part of the verb ending. Christ sometimes uses it humorously to refer to himself.

"But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

(1st sg pres ind act) "Say" is from lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command." =-- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

"They Have Received Their Reward

I teach reality: they have received all the compensation they are due.

"Verily" is from amen, which is from the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut." -- The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

(1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is from lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command." -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

(verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "They have"" is from apecho, which means "to keep off or away from", "to hold one's hands off or away from", "to hold oneself off a thing", "to abstain or desist from it," "to project", "to extend", "to be far from," and "to receive payment in full."

"Reward" is from misthos, which means "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, "pay", "hire", "fee", "recompense," and "reward."

Son of Man

The phrase "the son of man" is the common way Christ refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense is "the offspring of humanity." The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant". The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

(noun sg masc gen) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant.

(noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

The Kingdom of Heavens is Like

The phrase, "the kingdom of heavens" generally, and the phrase, "the kingdom of the heavens is like" specifically is discussed in more detail in this article.

(verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Is like" is from homoioo, which means "to make like", "to become like", "to liken," and "to compare. -- The verb translated as "be...like" is a verb that means "to make like" and, in the passive, as used here, "to become like."

(noun pl neut nom/acc) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

(noun pl masc gen) "Of Heaven" is from the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate." -- The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods.

Forgive Sins

"To forgive" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -- The word translated as "forgive" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

Sin" is from hamartia, which means "to miss the mark", "failure", "fault," and "error." Only in religious contexts does it become "guilt" and "sin." -- The word translated as "sin" is a form of a word that means "to fail in one's purpose", "to neglect," and "to be deprived of." It has no sense of doing malicious evil in Greek. The best English translation is "mistakes" or "failures" rather than what we commonly think of as the evils of "sin." See this article for more information and context.

Dative Case

The dative case has several uses in ancient Greek 1) the indirect object of an action ("Matthew gave his Gospel...to all.") 2) the instrumental dative ("Matthew wrote...with a pen.") 3) the location (in time or place) dative (...in Judea.") 4) to declare a purpose (]..as a testimony"), 5) a benefit ( "...for our benefit"); 6) possession ("...of his own") 7) an agent ("...by himself") and 8) a comparison ("...as the longest") 9) area of affect ("in the sphere of men")

Genitive Case

The genitive is always used with some prepositions and verbs, but it is also used for many other things including 1) the attribute genitive (functioning as an adjective), 2) the possessive genitive ("belonging to"), 3) the partitive genitive ("which is part of"), 4) the apposition genitive (same thing as head noun, i.e. "which is"), 5) the descriptive genitive ("described by'), 6) the genitive of comparison ("than" when used with "more", "less," etc.), 7) subjective genitive ("or") with participle ("coming of the son" becomes "the son comes" , 8) objective (‘for’, ‘about’, ‘concerning’, ‘toward’ or ‘against’) only with transitive noun ("blasphemy of the spirit" to "blasphemy against the spirit"), 9) absolute: a participle and noun at the beginning of a sentence ("while") 8) of time ("during", "within") of a word indicating time.

The Middle and Middle Passive

The Middle voice indicates that someone is acting on themselves or for their own benefit. "He washed himself."

The Middle Passive voice is a form that can be either the middle voice or a passive voice. In transitive verbs, it acts as a passive: "he is washed" but for non-transitive verbs, it is acts as the middle voice "he rested for his benefit" or "he rested himself".

  1. Reflexive: "I wash (myself)". This reflexive sense could also carry a sense of benefaction for the subject, as in the sentence "I sacrificed a goat (for my own benefit)."
  2. Reciprocal: "to fight" (with active) vs. "to fight each other" (with mp).
  3. Autocausative: describes situations where the subject causes itself to change state.
  4. State of Being. With verbs relating to standing, sitting, reclining, being afraid, being ashamed, and being pleased, etc.
  5. Intensive: "to be a citizen" (with active) vs. "to do the duties of being a citizen" (with middle).
  6. In deponent verbs that have not active form, for example, "to follow".
  7. Combined with the subjunctive to form the future tense of the verb "to be" in Classical Greek.

Optative Mood

Expresses as wish "If only..." or "Would that..." or a potential of future possibility "I would be happy to dine with you." Largely died out in the koine, but survives in some phrases.