Luk 4:23 Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself:

KJV Verse: 

Luk 4:23 Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

No doubt, you all want to say to me, the common saying, this one, "Doctor, take care of yourself! As much as we hear has come into being in that Capernaum, create also here in this fatherland of yours. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek word translated as "surely" is an adverb which means "in all ways", "especially", "absolutely", "no doubt", "by all means".

"Ye will say" is from the verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. The "you" is plural and the form is not in the future tense but a mood that expresses a wish or desire. In English "you want to say."

"This" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer."

"Parable" is Greek for "analogy", "comparison," and "illustration." It doesn't mean simply "educational story" as it has come to mean in English. It as the sense of "common saying". 

The Greek word for "physician" is a noun that means  "one who heals" so "doctor" or "surgeon". 

"Heal thyself" is from a Greek verb that means "to be an attendant, "do service", "do service to the gods", "treat medically", and "take care of oneself".  Interestingly, the verb is not in the form where the subject acts on himself. 

A reflexive pronoun appears here translated as "yourself". 

The word translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as", "" as much as," and similar ideas of comparison.

"We have heard" is a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. However, it is in the form of an adjective, "hearing." The form is not "we have heard" but "we hear" or "we heard". 

The word translated as "done" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. The form is an adjective, "becoming" or "coming into being". This is not the verb translated as "do" later in the verse.

The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure. 

An article "the" appears before the name of the city, Capernaum." This is unusual but the sense would be closer to the English "that". 

The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is in the form of a command or request. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). Here, it works like an "also". 

The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun.

The Greek word translated as "country" is a noun that means "of your fathers" so "fatherland". 

 

Vocabulary: 

Πάντως (adv) "Surely" is from pantos, an adverb which means "in all ways", "especially", "absolutely", "no doubt", "by all means", and with the negative ou, "in no way", and "by no means". 

ἐρεῖτέ (verb 2nd pl pres opt act) "Ye will say"  is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." 

μοι (pron 1st sg masc dat) "Unto me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- The "me" is in the dative, which has a number of uses in Greek.

τὴν παραβολὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Parable" is from parabole, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy." It is most often translated in the NT as "parable" but occasionally as "comparison." 

ταύτην (adj sg fem acc) "This" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

Ἰατρέ, (noun sg masc voc) "Physician" is from iotros, which means "one who heals", "physician", "doctor", and "surgeon." 

θεράπευσον (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Heal thyself" is from therapeuo, which means "to be an attendant, do service", "do service to the gods", "treat medically", "pay court to", "train" [animals]", "cultivate" [land]", and "take care of oneself". 

σεαυτόν: (pron, sg, masc/fem/neut, gen/dat/acc) "Yourself" is from seatou, which means "yourself." It is a contraction of sou autos.

ὅσα (adj pl neut acc) "Whatsoever" is hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as."

ἠκούσαμεν (verb 1st pl aor ind act ) "We have hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

γενόμενα (part sg aor mid fem nom) "Done" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὴν (article sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "who" is the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." It could also be a demonstrative pronoun, that often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

— Καφαρναοὺμ (noun) "Capernaum" is from Kapharnaoum, which is the Greek spelling of the fishing village in Galilee where Christ taught in the synagogue.

ποίησον (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

καὶ (prep) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ὧδε (adv) "Here" is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here." = The word translated as "in hither" means in manner, "in this way," referring to manner, or "here," referring to place.

ἐν (prep)  "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

τῇ πατρίδι (noun sg fem dat) "Country" is from patris, which means "of one's father's" and "ones fatherland," and "country."

σου. (adj sg neut gen) "Thy" is sou which means "you" and "your."

Aug 19 2017