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Mark 9:37 Whosoever shall receive one of such children in my name...
KJV Verse:

Mark 9:37  Whosoever shall receive one of such children in my name, receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me, receiveth not me, but him that sent me.

Greek Verse:

MAPKON 9:37 Ὃς ἂν [ἓν] τῶν τοιούτων παιδίων δέξηται ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματί μου, ἐμὲδέχεται: καὶ ὃς ἂν ἐμὲ δέχηται, οὐκ ἐμὲ δέχεται ἀλλὰ τὸν ἀποστείλαντά με.

Literal Alternative:

That one who might welcome one of these such as children such upon my name, welcomes me: and if that one welcomes me, he doesn't really welcome me but the one sending me. 

Hidden Meaning:

 

Of the three versions of this verse (the others are  Matthew 18:5 and  Luke 9:48) this one sounds more like Jesus's humor because of the contradiction within it.

 

Vocabulary:

Ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

[ἓν] (noun sg neut nom) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

τῶν (article pl neut gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

τοιούτων (adj pl neut gen) "Of such" is from toioutos, which means "such as this", "so great a thing", "such a condition", "such a reason", "and suchlike."

παιδίων (noun pl neut gen diminutive) "Children" is from paidon. which means "little child" or "young child," (up to seven years) "infant" or "young slave."

δέξηται (verb 3rd sg aor subj mid) "Shall receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. 

ἐπὶ (prep) "In" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τῷ (article sg neut dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ὀνόματί (noun sg neut dat) "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. 

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which means "me", and "mine". --  

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -

δέχεται, (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause..

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". --

δέξηται (verb 3rd sg aor subj mid) "Shall receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. 

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

ἐμὲ  (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

δέχεται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

 ἀλλὰ (conj) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." 

τὸν s(article sg masc acc) "Him" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀποστείλαντά (part sg aor act masc acc) "Him that sent" is apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch." 

με: (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

Related Verses:

Matthew 18:5 And whoever shall receive one such little child

Luke 9:48 Whosoever shall receive this child in my name receiveth me

Matthew 18:4 Whoever therefore shall humble himself as this little child,

Christ's Words Articles

About this Site

I started this project over a decade ago. The initial goal was to satisfy my own curiosity about how the original Greek of Jesus's words was translated into English comparing it to my work in translating ancient Chinese. 

This site does not promote any religious point of view about Christianity. I purposely use nonreligious sources for Greek translation.  My goal is simply to identify how Jesus used words. His use of Greek words somewhat unique since his words were spoken, not written.

The range of quality of the articles on this site reflects that it is a personal site, not a commercial one. No one proofreads my work. Some articles are over a decade old when I knew much less ancient Greek. Matthew articles are best since I have updated them all at least once. The ones in Mark are the oldest and poorest. Luke is not yet complete.