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Mark 9:43 And if your hand offends you, cut it off:
KJV Verse:

Mark 9:43 And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched:

Greek Verse:

MAPKON 9:43 Καὶ ἐὰν σκανδαλίσῃ σε χείρ σου, ἀπόκοψον αὐτήν: καλόν ἐστίν σε κυλλὸν εἰσελθεῖν εἰς τὴν ζωὴν τὰς δύο χεῖρας ἔχοντα ἀπελθεῖν εἰς τὴν γέενναν, εἰς τὸ πῦρ τὸ ἄσβεστον.

Literal Alternative:

And when it trips up, that hand of yours trips you up, cut of. Good it is for you maimed to go into the life than having those two hand having to depart into the Gehenna into that pyre unquenchable.

Hidden Meaning:

The first unusual aspect of this verse is that all the second person pronouns are in the singular, addressed to one person, rather than a group. The previous second-person pronouns (in Mark 9:41) were in plural. The key word here is a "Greek" word translated as "offend" that is found only in the Bible.  It ties this verse to the previous one, Mark 9:42, which also used this word. It refers to putting a stumbling block before someone so that they trip and thereby offending them. In English, we would simply say, "trips you up." Though it doesn't sound like it in English translation, Christ uses this word to make light of his affect on the thinking of others. The word translated as "go" in the "go into hell" line means to depart from life.

Though a slightly difference vocabulary is used here than in Mat 18:8, it preserves the same the play on words, where "cutting it off" also means "stop it." While this sounds in translation like a pretty extreme, there is a lot more humor in the original Greek.

Wordplay:

The word chosen as "go into hell" means "to depart from life."

Vocabulary:

Καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐὰν (conj) "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

σκανδαλίσῃ ( verb 2nd sg aor subj mid ) "Offend" is skandalizo, which means "to cause to stumble", "to give offense," and "to scandalize." -

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun.

(article sg fem nom ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

χείρ ( noun sg fem nom ) "Hand" is cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

σου, (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your." 

ἀπόκοψον [uncommon]( verb 2nd sg aor imperat act ) "Cut off" is apokopto, which means "cut off", "hew off", "exclude from reckoning", "cut short", "bring to an abrupt close," and "smite in the breast from mourning."

αὐτήν: ( adj sg fem acc ) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καλόν ( noun sg neut nom ) "Good" is kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

ἐστίν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun. -

κυλλὸν [unique]( adj sg masc acc ) "Maimed" is from kullos (kyllos) which means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."

εἰσελθεῖν ( verb aor inf act ) "To enter" is eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ζωὴν ( noun sg fem acc ) "Life" is zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

(conj/adv)  "Than" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." OR (exclam) "Or" is e which is an exclamation meaning "hi!" OR (adv) "Or" is e, which is an adverb meaning "in truth" and "of a surety".

τὰς (article pl fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δύο (number) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair."

χεῖρας (noun pl fem acc) "Hands" is cheir which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

ἔχοντα ( part sg pres act masc acc ) "Having" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἀπελθεῖν ( verb aor inf act ) "Go into" is aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

τὴν (article sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

γέενναν, ( noun sg fem acc ) "Hell" is geenna which is Greek for Gehenna, the valley of Hinnom (the Hebrew word), south of Jerusalem where trash, including diseased animals and human corpses was burned. A constant fire was kept burning there.

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

τὸ (article noun sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πῦρ ( noun sg neut acc) "Fire" is pyr (pur), which means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", "hearth-fire", "lightning", "the light of torches," and "heat of fever."

τὸ (article sg fem acc) "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἄσβεστον. [uncommon]( adj sg neut acc ) "Never shall be quenched" is from asbestos which means "unquenchable," and "inextinguishable."

Related Verses:

Matthew 5:30 And if your right hand offend you,

Matthew 18:8 Wherefore if your hand or your foot offend thee,

Christ's Words Articles

About this Site

I started this project over a decade ago. The initial goal was to satisfy my own curiosity about how the original Greek of Jesus's words was translated into English comparing it to my work in translating ancient Chinese. 

This site does not promote any religious point of view about Christianity. I purposely use nonreligious sources for Greek translation.  My goal is simply to identify how Jesus used words. His use of Greek words somewhat unique since his words were spoken, not written.

The range of quality of the articles on this site reflects that it is a personal site, not a commercial one. No one proofreads my work. Some articles are over a decade old when I knew much less ancient Greek. Matthew articles are best since I have updated them all at least once. The ones in Mark are the oldest and poorest. Luke is not yet complete.