John 12:7 Let her alone: against the day

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Leave her alone because she has taken care of this until the time of preparing my body burial.

KJV : 

Jhn 12:7 Let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "let alone" is the same word commonly translated in the NT as "forgive." It is a command (impreative) addressed to a single person not plural as we would expect if Christ was talking to everyone around. Christ was telling Judas personally to let the woman be. Apparently, none of the other apostles were against her.

The Greek hina (meaning "because" here) is omitted in the KJV because it did not occur the version of Greek used by the KJV translators, which was the Greek translated from the Latin Vulgate not the original Greek we use today. It explains why she is anointing him.

The word translated as "burying" only appears in the Gospels. It is constructed of two Greek word meaning "in tomb" (en taphos). See below.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἄφες (2nd sg aor imperat act) "Let" is from aphiêmi (aphiemi), which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

αὐτήν "Her" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἵνα Untranslated is hina (hina), which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

εἰς "Against" is from eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν ἡμέραν "The day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

τοῦ ἐνταφιασμοῦ "Burying" is from entaphiasmos, which means "laying out for burial", from two Greek words meaning "in tomb" (en taphos). This is the noun form of the verb, ἐνταφιάζω (entaphiazo) which means to prepare a body for burial, which in the Jewish tradition means washing, dressing, anointing, perfuming, etc. These words only appear in the NT Bible.

μου "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

τηρήσῃ (3rd sg aor subj act) "Kept" is from têreô (tereo), which means "to watch over", "to guard", "to take care of", "to give heed to", "to keep," and "to observe."

αὐτό "This" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."