Luke 16:25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

He said, however, Abraham, "Child, be reminded that you took from those beneficial things of yours in that life of yours and Lazarus, similarly, the pernicious. Now, however,  here he has summoned himself. You yourself, however, cause yourself pain.  

KJV : 

Luke 16:25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse simply describes the afterlife as a balancing point. The rich man is not accused of violating the law or doing evil. He is being "tested" (not "tormented" as the KJV says) because his life was too easy. While Lazarus is being rewarded simply because his life was too hard. The "realm of the skies" is consistently described by Jesus as a land of opposites and this story is an extreme case. Even more hidden is that the "realm of the skies" is what people do to themselves. This is hidden in the use of the verb form in ancient Greek where the subject acts on or for themselves.

The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

"Abraham" is the Greek form of "Abraham."

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Jesus does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

"Remember" is a Greek verb that means "to remind", "to put in mind", "to recall to memory", and "to remember,". It is passive here and a command, "Be reminded". 

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

"Thou...receivedst" is an uncommon Greek verb for Jesus. It means "take or receive from", and "receive what is one's due". Its root is the common word that Jesus uses that means both "take" and "receive" like the English word "get".  Its prefix means "from". The sense is "got from" or "took from". 

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

The word translated as "lifetime" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus has used it to mean "existence" beyond physical life, but here it seems to refer to physical life alone. Two other words in Greek refer to a lifetime more clearly.

The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

The adjective translated as "good things" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. As a noun, the word "valuables" makes the idea clearer than "goods".  The "things" comes from the use of the article, "the" making it act like a plural, neutral noun. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil.",

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "likewise" is an adjective that means "like", "resembling," and "matching." 

"Lazarus" is the Greek form of the name "Lazarus".  

The word translated as "evil things" is an adjective which means many different forms of "bad," including "ugly", "low born", "craven," and "ill." In the NT, it is often translated as "evil." The "things" comes from the use of an article making it a plural, neutral noun. More about it in this article.

The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The Greek word translated as "now" \means "now", "at the present moment","presently," and "as it is."

An untranslated word appears here that means "in this way," referring to manner, or "here," referring to place. 

The Greek verb that translated as "he is comforted," literally means will be "to be called near." So it primarily means "to summon" or "to be summoned" in the passive. Here, the voice is "middle", which means that the subject acts on himself. Lazarus called himself to his afterlife. The verb also means "to demand," ("called from") "to encourage," ("called along") and "to excite" (called beyond"). We will see this word again when it is translated as "to call," "to beseech," and "to pray", (Mat 18:32Mat 18:29, and Mat 26:53). In all of them, "call upon" works best in English both in the sense of "summoned" and "to ask." In Luke 15:28, it is translated as "intreated" (entreated). However, here and famously, in Matthew 5:4, it is translated as "comforted" more for religious reasons than anything else. 

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The "thou" here is the pronoun. Since pronouns are not usually used for subject in Greek, its use is to accentuate the word like we would say "you yourself".

"Are tormented" is a Greek verb that means to "cause one pain or suffering".  The form indicates that the man is causing pain for himself. This word is uncommon, only used here and in the previous verse. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "I have called" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." -- "Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

Ἀβραάμ (Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

Τέκνον, (noun sg neut voc) "Child" is teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young." -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

μνήσθητι (verb 2nd sg aor imperat pass) "Remember" is mnaomai, which means "to remind", "to put in mind", "to recall to memory", "to remember," and "to give heed to."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

ἀπέλαβες  [uncommon] (verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Receivedst" is from apolambano, which means "take or receive from", "receive what is one's due", "take of", "take a part of a thing", "regain", "recover",  "take apart or aside" (of persons),  "cut off", and "intercept."

τὰ ἀγαθά (adj pl neut acc) "Good things" is agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." -- The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. As a noun, the word "valuables" makes the idea clearer than "goods".  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

τῇ ζωῇ (noun sg fem da) "Life" is zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Christ uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

σου, (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

Λάζαρος  (Hebrew name) "Lazarus" is Lazaros which is the Greek form of the name "Lazarus".  - "Lazarus" is the Greek form of the name "Lazarus".  

ὁμοίως (adv) "Likewise" is homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally." -- The word translated as "like" is an adjective that means "like", "resembling," and "matching." 

τὰ κακά: (adj pl neut acc) "Evil things" is kakos, which means "bad", "mean", "base", "ugly", "ill-born", "evil", "worthless", "sorry", "pernicious," and "ill." -- The word translated as "sick" is an adjective which means many different forms of "bad," including "ugly", "low born", "craven," and "ill." In the NT, it is often translated as "evil." More about it in this article.

νῦν (adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is." -- The Greek word translated as "now" \means "now", "at the present moment","presently," and "as it is."

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

ὧδε (adv) Untranslated is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here." = The word translated as "in hither" means in manner, "in this way," referring to manner, or "here," referring to place. 

παρακαλεῖται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "He is comforted" is from parakaleo which means "call in", "send for", "invite," "summon", "address", "demand", "exhort", "encouraged", "excite", "demand," and "beseech." It means literally "call closer." The prefix, para, means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond" and so on. The based word kaleo, means "call", "summon", and "invite".

σὺ (pron 2nd pl acc) "Thou" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

ὀδυνᾶσαι. [uncommon](verb 1st sg pres ind mp ) "I am tormented" is odynaō, which means to " cause one pain or suffering". -- "I am tormented" is a Greek verb that means to " cause one pain or suffering".  The form indicates that the man is causing pain for himself. This word is uncommon, only used here and in the previous verse. 

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). 

Ἀβραάμ (Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

Τέκνον, (noun sg neut voc) "Son" is teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."

μνήσθητι (verb 2nd sg aor imperat pass) "Remember" is mnaomai, which means "to remind", "to put in mind", "to recall to memory", "to remember," and "to give heed to."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." 

ἀπέλαβες  [uncommon] (verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Thou receivedst" is from apolambano, which means "take or receive from", "receive what is one's due", "take of", "take a part of a thing", "regain", "recover",  "take apart or aside" (of persons),  "cut off", and "intercept."

τὰ ἀγαθά (adj pl neut acc) "Good things" is agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." -

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". 

τῇ ζωῇ (noun sg fem da) "Lifetime" is zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death. --

σου, (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

Λάζαρος  (Hebrew name) "Lazarus" is Lazaros which is the Greek form of the name "Lazarus". 

ὁμοίως (adv) "Likewise" is homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally."

τὰ κακά: (adj pl neut acc) "Evil things" is kakos, which means "bad", "mean", "base", "ugly", "ill-born", "evil", "worthless", "sorry", "pernicious," and "ill." 

νῦν (adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is." 

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). 

ὧδε (adv) Untranslated is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here."

παρακαλεῖται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "He is comforted" is from parakaleo which means "call in", "send for", "invite," "summon", "address", "demand", "exhort", "encouraged", "excite", "demand," and "beseech." It means literally "call closer." The prefix, para, means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond" and so on. The based word kaleo, means "call", "summon", and "invite".

σὺ (pron 2nd sg nom) "Thou" is su which means "you" and "your."

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

ὀδυνᾶσαι. [uncommon](verb 1st sg pres ind mp ) "I am tormented" is odynaō, which means to " cause one pain or suffering". 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 29 2018