Luke 17:34 I tell you, in that night there shall be two men in one bed;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 17:34 I tell you, in that night there shall be two men in one bed; the one shall be taken, and the other shall be left.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

I'm telling you during that night,  they shall be, a couple, upon a couch, one, that one will be admitted and the other shall be let loose.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

It is odd that "men" is added to this verse when it is not in the Greek. The forms of the verbs are also interesting in terms of who does what do whom and do not completely agree with versions in Matthew (Matthew 24:40, Matthew 24:41), which are in the present tense.

The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count", "to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.

The "in that" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb, it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.  The "in" comes from the indicated object form, which when used with time, like the night below, means "during".

"Night" is a noun that means "night", "midnight", and is a metaphor for darkness.

The verb "there shall be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are" or "they are".

The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

The word translated as "in" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."

The word translated as "bed" means "that on which one lies," but it also means a "grave-niche."

The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

The Greek translated as "shall be taken" is very uncommon in the Gospels, but very common in Greek though the spelling in non-standard. One of the reasons it is so common in is that it has a wide variety of different uses. It is from a verb that means to "to receive from", "to take upon oneself", "to get control of", "to find", and "to undertake". The root word is very common in the Gospels and its meaning is both to "take" and to "receive" as we use the word "get" in English. The literal meaning is something to "to get with" or "to get from". It also has a number of special meaning such as "to invite" and "to take a prisoner." It doesn't quite mean "taken" except in the sense of taking prisoners. The ending is a future passive ending so "shall be admitted comes closest, but this assumes the same word with a more standard spelling is used in the similar verses in Matthew (Matthew 24:40, Matthew 24:41). The following verse (Luke 17:35) also uses the same unusual spelling.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

The word translated as "the other " means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun with an article before it, "the other".

The word translated as "shall be left" primarily means "to let go" "to pass by", or "to send away." This word is common both in Greek and in the Gospels. This word translated in a wide variety of ways, however, in the Gospels, "leave", "forgive", "suffer," (in the sense of "put up with") and "let" (in the sense of "to leave alone") in the New Testament. This word figures largely in modern Christianity because it is translated as "forgive" in phrases such as "forgive sins". Here the form is passive, but in the similar verses in Matthew, it is the form where someone acts on themselves.

Greek Vocabulary: 

λέγω ( verb 1st sg pres ind act ) "I tell" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

ταύτῃ ( adj sg fem dat ) "In that" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage.

τῇ νυκτὶ  ( noun sg fem dat ) "Night" is from nyx, which means "night", "midnight", and is a metaphor for darkness.

ἔσονται ( verb 3rd pl fut ind mid ) "There shall be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") 

δύο (numeral) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

ἐπὶ (prep) "In" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

κλίνης ( noun sg fem gen ) "Bed" is kline, which means "that on which one lies", "couch," and a "grave-niche."

[μιᾶς], ( adj sg fem gen ) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.  --

(article sg masc nom) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

εἷς (noun sg masc nom) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen. 

παραλημφθήσεται [uncommon](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be taken" is from paralambano, which means "to receive from", "to take to oneself", "to admit", "to employ", "to undertake", "to take a pledge", "to take or to receive as a substitute", "to take up", "to catch up", "to invite", "to take to oneself" (as in a wife), "to get control of," and "to take a prisoner." In the passive, it means "to be received", "to be admitted", "to be accepted", "to be found", "to be used", "to be derived", "to be taken prisoner".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἕτερος ( adj sg masc nom ) "the other" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly." --

ἀφεθήσεται: ( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "Shall be left" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

Related Verses: 

Oct 2 2018