Mark 10:29 ...There is no man that hath left house or brother...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Honestly, I'm telling you.  There is no one that left a house or brothers or sisters or father, mother or wife or children or lands because of me and because of this good news...

KJV : 

Mark 10:29 Verily I say unto you, There is no man that hath left house, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, and the gospel's,

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is clearly playful, starting with the "amen" phrase Jesus used as a personal signature.  If you  think about how this phrase was spoken, with it many "or" phrases, it would clearly have been humorous.  It is actually the "set up" for a punchline, saying that opposite of what it seems to say. This is so much the case that the NLT version actually reverses the meaning of the word "no one" to "every one" to kill its real meaning.

While at first glance, this verse seems to be saying that we should sacrifice our relationships for the reward of the good news, a closer reading says that opposite. It says no one has given up these things.  The first clause denies Peter's claim that people have left everything. He then lists all the things that no one has left. This is funny. Then he gives the reasons that they haven't left them: him and the good news. The statement contradicts itself because no one gave up these things, but these were the reasons.

This all, of course, sets up the next verse with is the punch line.

NIV : 

Mark 10:29  Truly I tell you, no one who has left home or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or fields for me and the gospel

NLT : 

Mark 10:29  Yes, and I assure you that everyone who has given up house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or property, for my sake and for the Good News,

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἀμὴν (exclam) "Verily" is amen, which is the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut." -

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

οὐδεὶς (adj sg masc nom) "No man" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." -- The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "There is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

ὃς (pro sg masc nom) "that" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

ἀφῆκεν (verb 3rd sg imperf ind) "Hath left" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -- The word translated as "forgive" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

οἰκίαν (noun sg fem acc) "House" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household."

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀδελφοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Brothers" is from adelphos (adelphos),which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀδελφὰς [uncommon]( noun pl fem acc) "Sisters" is from adelphe,which means "sister", "kinswoman," and was a term of endearment for a wife.

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

πατέρα (noun sg masc acc) "The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

μητέρα (noun sg fem acc) "Mother" is from mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin."

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

τέκνα (noun pl neut acc) "Children" is from teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀγροὺς (noun pl masc acc )"Lands" is agros, which means "field", "lands," or "country."

ἕνεκεν (prep) "For...sake" is from heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." -- The word translated as "sake" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

ἐμοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "My" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

[ἕνεκεν] (prep) "For...sake" is from heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

τοῦ (article sg neut gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the")

εὐαγγελίου,  ( noun sg neut gen) "The gospel's" is euaggelion.a "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, ""good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news.

KJV Analysis: 

Verily -- The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." See this article discussing this "amen phrase."

I -- This is fom the first-person singular form of the verb.

say The word translated as "I say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This is from the dative form of the following pronoun, used to indicate indirect objects.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

There -- This is from the singular form of the following verb. When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." However, here it follows the subject, "no one" or "no man" so it seems unnecessary and perhaps misleading.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." However, here it follows the subject, "no one" or "no man". The sense is "no one exists".

no man -- The Greek word translated as "no man" also means "no one, "nothing" and other negatives nouns depending on the form. There is no word for "man" here.  The form here is masculine, singular.

that -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. In English, when referring to a person, "who" works best.

hath -- (WT) This helping verb seems to indicate that the following verb is in the past perfect tense, but it isn't. It is the simple past where the action has not been completed.

left --  The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

house, The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brethren, -- The word translated as "brothers" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, -- "Sisters" in an uncommon Greek word for Jesus. It is the female form of the word translated as "brothers."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is from the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or wife,-- (OS) The word for "wife" does not exist in today's sources. This is important because otherwise, Christ's lessons would not be consistent. After all, the given that this chapter begins with lessons about marriage, saying that a man cannot leave his wife.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

lands, -- "Lands" is from the common noun that means "field", "lands," or "countryside."

for -- "For...sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

my -- "My" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in a form that can be translated as "my
 or "of me."

sake  -- "For...sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the .-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel's, -- "Gospel" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself.

  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "hath" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something that was started in the past.
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "or  wife" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.

NIV Analysis: 

Truly-- The word translated as "truly" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." See this article discussing this "amen phrase."

I -- This is fom the first-person singular form of the verb.

tell - The word translated as "tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

untranslated "is"-- (MW) The untranslated word "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." However, here it follows the subject, "no one" or "no man". The sense is "no one exists".

no one -- The Greek word translated as "no one" also means "no person, "nothing" and other negatives nouns depending on the form. There is no word for "man" here.  The form here is masculine, singular.

who -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. In English, when referring to a person, "who" works best.

has -- (WT) This helping verb seems to indicate that the following verb is in the past perfect tense, but it isn't. It is the simple past where the action has not been completed.

left --  The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

home, The Greek word translated as "home," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brothers , -- The word translated as "brothers" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, -- "Sisters" in an uncommon Greek word for Jesus. It is the female form of the word translated as "brothers."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is from the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

fields , -- "Fields" is from the common noun that means "field", "lands," or "countryside."

for -- (WW) "For." is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

me --  (WF) "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in a form that can be translated as "my
 or "of me." The preposition requires this form to work in English as in Greek when properly translated.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the .-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel. -- "Gospel" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself.

NIV Translation Issues: 

3
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something that was started in the past.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" means "because."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "me" should be an "of me."

NLT Analysis: 

Yes-- (WW) The word translated as "yes" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." See this article discussing this "amen phrase."

I -- This is fom the first-person singular form of the verb.

assure - (WW) The word translated as "assure" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

untranslated "is"-- (MW) The untranslated word "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." However, here it follows the subject, "no one" or "no man". The sense is "no one exists".

that -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "that" except the word translated as "who" below in the Greek source.

everyone  -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "no one" also means "no person, "nothing" and other negatives nouns depending on the form. There is no word for "man" here.  The form here is masculine, singular.

who -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. In English, when referring to a person, "who" works best.

has -- (WT) This helping verb seems to indicate that the following verb is in the past perfect tense, but it isn't. It is the simple past where the action has not been completed.

given up --  The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

house -- The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brothers , -- The word translated as "brothers" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, -- "Sisters" in an uncommon Greek word for Jesus. It is the female form of the word translated as "brothers."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is from the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- The "or" here is from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

property, -- "Property" is from the common noun that means "field", "lands," or "countryside."

for -- "For...sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

my -- "My" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in a form that can be translated as "my
 or "of me."

sake  -- "For...sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the .-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Good News. -- "Good News" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself.

NLT Translation Issues: 

6
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "yes" means "truly."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "assure" means "tell."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "is" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "everyone" means "no one."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something that was started in the past.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

This verse seems to cover all aspects of the realm of relationship, which Christ deems the most important area of our temporary life on earth. (More on the concept of "a house" and family at Mar 3.33.) The list of eight types of relationships also indicates the use of the pattern of three plus one, repeated twice as it was in the Beatitudes.  If the symbol pattern is the same, we get an extended key of Christ's symbolic system. House and mother symbolize the spiritual realm. Father and lands symbolize the physical realm. Brother and wife symbolize the emotional realm, and sister and children symbolize the mental realm.

This larger key is consistent with Christ's symbol of the Father as the physical aspect of the eternal as the Creator, the Son (child) as the mental aspect of the eternal as the Word, and, interestingly, and the Spirit as the relationship aspect of the eternal.

Front Page Date: 

Oct 15 2019