Mark 12:26 And as touching the dead, that they rise:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

But concerning the dead that they are awakened: have you not recognized in the book of Moses, about the bramble, how he spoke to him, the Divine, God saying, I myself [am] the God Abraham, and the God Isaac, and the God Jacob?

KJV : 

Mark 12:26 And as touching the dead, that they rise: have ye not read in the book of Moses, how in the bush God spake unto him, saying, I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

First, the verb beginning this verse is not "and" which would indicate an agreement with the previous verse. It is the Greek conjunction that indicates an opposing position. Christ is disagreeing with the idea that might be people risen from the dead.

A different word is also used here than in the previous verse to describe being raised from the dead and a different mood.  In the previous verse, Christ simply repeated the term that those questioning him used using the same subjunctive mood indicating a future possibility. In this verse, he uses a different term and it is present indicative, meaning something that is happening right now. The verb in the previous verse describes someone arising themselves, but this verb describes someone else being awaken by another. So, there is a strong sense that Christ is saying that death is an illusion. People do not die to possibly awakened in the future. They are awakened immediately upon death.

The use of "bramble" is also interesting because it seems to say something about God hiding, not only himself  but the nature of reality in a tangle.

This verse has a number of Hebrew names written in Greek letters, but only the name of Moses has a Greek form, where a possessive from is use.

NIV : 

Mark 12:26 Now about the dead rising—have you not read in the Book of Moses, in the account of the burning bush, how God said to him, ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob

NLT : 

Mark 12:26 But now, as to whether the dead will be raised—haven’t you ever read about this in the writings of Moses, in the story of the burning bush? Long after Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had died, God said to Moses,[fn] ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.’

Wordplay: 

Jesus likes to use the words for "I" and "say" right next to each other for that "lego ego" rhyming affect.  See Mat 11:33 for a previous example. (Yes, just like the modern commercial, Let go, my Eggo. Weird, isn't it?)

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

περὶ (prep) "As touching" is peri, which means "round about (Place)", "around", "about", "concerning", "on account of", "in regard to", "before", "above", "beyond," and "all around."

δὲ " (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

τῶν (article pl masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

νεκρῶν ( adj pl masc gen ) "The dead" is nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic"

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἐγείρονται ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "They rise" is egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse."

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἀνέγνωτε ( verb 2nd pl aor ind act ) "Read" is from anaginosko, which means "to recognize", "to know well", "to know certainly", "to know again", "to own," and "to acknowledge."

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." 

τῇ (article sg fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

βίβλῳ (2 verses)( noun sg fem dat ) "Book" is biblos, which means "Egyptian papyrus", "rind", "roll of papyrus", "book," and a "division of a book."

Μωυσέως (Hebrew Name) "Moses" is Moyses, which means "Moses".

ἐπὶ (prep) "In" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

τοῦ (article sg fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

βάτου (4 verses)(noun sg neut gen) "Bush" is batos, which means "bramble."

πῶς (adv/conj) "How" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

εἶπεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act )  "Spake"is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

αὐτῷ  (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity."

λέγων ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Saying" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Ἐγὼ (pro sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the firs-person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity."

Ἀβραὰμ (Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity."

Ἰσαὰκ (Hebrew name) "Isaac" is from Isaak.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Ἰακώβ;”  (Hebrew name) "Jacob" is from Iakob.

KJV Analysis: 

And -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

as touching -- The Greek preposition translated as "as touching" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dead, -- The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter.

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

they -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the following verb.

rise:  -- The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. This is a different verb than the one used in the previous verse,Mark 12:25.

have -- (WT) This helping verb indicates that the following verb is a past tense, but the tense indicates something happening at some point in time, past, present, or future. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

read --  (WW) "Read" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

book -- "Book" is from a Greek word that means "Egyptian papyrus", "rind", "roll of papyrus", "book," and a "division of a book." Surprisingly, the word "book" is only used two times by Jesus.

of -- -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs.  Moses is on of the few Hebrew names that Jesus uses in a Greek form which allows for various cases.

Moses, "Moses" is a Greek spelling of "Moses". It is in the genitive form.

how -- "How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

in -- The word translated as "in" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

bush -- "Bush" is from a noun Jesus uses four times that means "bramble."

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

spake -- "Spake" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

unto  -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

saying, -- The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Jesus uses it more frequently. This is different than the "spake" used earlier.

I -- The pronoun "I" is added to add emphasis that he is referring to his own words. It is unnecessary because the first-person indication is part of the verb ending. In English, so the effect is emphasis as we might say "I myself."

am -- There is no verb "to be" here in the Greek. However, when noun and pronouns appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" is assumed.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Abraham, "Abraham" is from the Greek form of "Abraham."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Isaac, "Isaac" is from Isaak.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Jacob? "Jacob" is from Iakob.

KJV Translation Issues: 

3
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" means "but."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something happening at a point in time past, present, or future.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "read" means "recognize."

NIV Analysis: 

Now-- (WW) The Greek word translated as "now" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

about -- The Greek preposition translated as "as touching" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dead, -- The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter.

untranslated "that "-- (MW) The untranslated word "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

rising:  -- (WF) The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. This is a different verb than the one used in the previous verse, Mark 12:25. The form is not a participle, but an active verb, "rise.

have -- (WT) This helping verb indicates that the following verb is a past tense, but the tense indicates something happening at some point in time, past, present, or future. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

read --  (WW) "Read" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

book -- "Book" is from a Greek word that means "Egyptian papyrus", "rind", "roll of papyrus", "book," and a "division of a book." Surprisingly, the word "book" is only used two times by Jesus.

of -- -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs.  Moses is on of the few Hebrew names that Jesus uses in a Greek form which allows for various cases.

Moses, "Moses" is a Greek spelling of "Moses". It is in the genitive form.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the account of  -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "the account of  " in the Greek source.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

burning -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "burning" in the Greek source.

bush -- "Bush" is from a noun Jesus uses four times that means "bramble."

how -- "How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

said-- "Spake" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

to  -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

saying, -- The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Jesus uses it more frequently. This is different than the "spake" used earlier.

I -- The pronoun "I" is added to add emphasis that he is referring to his own words. It is unnecessary because the first-person indication is part of the verb ending. In English, so the effect is emphasis as we might say "I myself."

am -- There is no verb "to be" here in the Greek. However, when noun and pronouns appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" is assumed.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Abraham, "Abraham" is from the Greek form of "Abraham."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Isaac, "Isaac" is from Isaak.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Jacob? "Jacob" is from Iakob.

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "now" means "but."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The pronoun "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "rising" is not a participle but an active verb, "rise."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something happening at a point in time past, present, or future.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "read" means "recognize."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the account of" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "burning" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.

NLT Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

now, -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "now" in the Greek source.

as to whether-- The Greek preposition translated as "as to whether" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dead, -- The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter.

untranslated "that "-- (MW) The untranslated word "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

will  -- (WT) This helping verb "will" indicates that the following verb is the future tense but it is the present tense.

be -- (WF) This helping verb "be" seems to indicate that the following verb is passive but it isn't. It is a verb from that indicates the subject is acting on itself. 

raised:  -- The word for "raised" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. This is a different verb than the one used in the previous verse, Mark 12:25.

have -- (WT) This helping verb indicates that the following verb is a past tense, but the tense indicates something happening at some point in time, past, present, or future. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

n't -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

ever  -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "ever" in the Greek source.

read --  (WW) "Read" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

 about this  -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "about this" in the Greek source.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

writings -- (WW) "Writings" is from a Greek word that means "Egyptian papyrus", "rind", "roll of papyrus", "book," and a "division of a book." Surprisingly, the word "book" is only used two times by Jesus. This is not hte word always translated as "writings" in the Gospels.

of -- -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs.  Moses is on of the few Hebrew names that Jesus uses in a Greek form which allows for various cases.

Moses, "Moses" is a Greek spelling of "Moses". It is in the genitive form.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the story of  -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "the story of  " in the Greek source.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

burning -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "burning" in the Greek source.

bush -- "Bush" is from a noun Jesus uses four times that means "bramble."

 Long after Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had died,  -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "long after Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had died" in the Greek source.

untranslated "how "-- (MW) The untranslated "how" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

said-- "Spake" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

to  -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

Moses -- (WW) The word translated as "Moses" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

saying, -- The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Jesus uses it more frequently. This is different than the "spake" used earlier.

I -- The pronoun "I" is added to add emphasis that he is referring to his own words. It is unnecessary because the first-person indication is part of the verb ending. In English, so the effect is emphasis as we might say "I myself."

am -- There is no verb "to be" here in the Greek. However, when noun and pronouns appear in the form of a subject without a verb, the verb "to be" is assumed.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Abraham, "Abraham" is from the Greek form of "Abraham."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Isaac, "Isaac" is from Isaak.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

of -- Normally, this word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  However, here the next word is Hebrew, not Greek, so this is added to make the translation flow better.

Jacob? "Jacob" is from Iakob.

NLT Translation Issues: 

14

 

  •   IW - Inserted Word -- The word "now" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The pronoun "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" seems to indicate the future tense, but the tense of the verb is present.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" does not indicate a passive verb. The verb is the middle voice, "awaken themselves."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" seems to indicate an action completed in the past, but the tense is something happening at a point in time past, present, or future.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "ever" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "read" means "recognize."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "about this" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "writings" means "book."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the story of" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "burning" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "long after Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had died," doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The pronoun "how" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "Moses" means "him."

Front Page Date: 

Nov 26 2019