Mark 7:29 For this saying go your way; the devil is gone out of your daughter.

KJV Verse: 

Mark 7:29 For this saying go thy way; the devil is gone out of thy daughter.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

By this the idea, depart. It has gone out of that daughter of yours, this demon.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Jesus says earlier in Mat 12:37 that by our "words" we are justified and condemned. The term for "words" in that verse and 'sayings" in this verse is the same.  The Greek word means "idea" or "thought," but it is usually translated in the Gospels as "word" for poetic reasons. "  When Jesus sends people off to live their lives, he often tells them "to go their way" to signify that it is their ideas that determined the course  of their lives for example in Mat 8:13.

KJV Analysis: 

For -- The word translated as "for" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)."

this -- "This" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

saying -- "Saying" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it. 

go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

thy -- There is no Greek word for this, but it is taken from the verb above.

way; -- There is no Greek word for this, but it is taken from the verb above, which has the sense of "go away."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

devil --  "Devil" is a word which means "belonging to a demon." It is based on the noun for "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil". In Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player." See this article on "demon" and related terms such as "devil". Generally, "having a demon" was how people of Christ's time said that someone had mental problems. See this article on demons and mental illness. 

is -- This comes from the form of the following verb, but since the verb describes an action completed in the past "has" is more appropriate.

gone out -- The word translated as "gone" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true."  This verb has a  prefix, meaning "out of" from the following preposition.

of -- The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun. Since it follows the noun, the sense is more "of yours."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

daughter. -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves. It doesn't not start the sentence, but the following word does.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Διὰ (prep) "For" is dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

τοῦτον ( adj sg masc acc ) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

τὸν (article sg masc acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λόγον ( noun sg masc acc ) "Saying" is logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value."

ὕπαγε, ( verb 2nd sg pres imperat act ) "Go" is hupago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you."

ἐξελήλυθεν ( verb 3rd sg perf ind act ) "Is gone" is exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true."

ἐκ (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῆς (article sg fem gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

θυγατρός ( noun sg fem gen ) "Daughter" is the Greek, thygater, which is generally a female descendant, "maidservant", "female slave," and "villages dependent on a city." -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves. It doesn't not start the sentence, but the following word does.

σου (adj sg neut gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your." 

τὸ (article sg neut acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δαιμόνιον. ( noun sg neut acc ) "Devil" is daimonion, which means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit." Technically, it means "belonging to a demon. "Evil spirit" is a New Testament usage or interpretation. " It is from daimôn, which actually is the noun "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil" (though it seems the way the Jews used it here), but in Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player."

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